The Wolves of Andover

The Wolves of Andover

by Kathleen Kent

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Overview

In the harsh wilderness of colonial Massachusetts, Martha Allen works as a servant in her cousin's household, taking charge and locking wills with everyone. Thomas Carrier labors for the family and is known both for his immense strength and size and mysterious past. The two begin a courtship that suits their independent natures, with Thomas slowly revealing the story of his part in the English Civil War. But in the rugged new world they inhabit, danger is ever present, whether it be from the assassins sent from London to kill the executioner of Charles I or the wolves-in many forms-who hunt for blood. A love story and a tale of courage, The Wolves of Andover confirms Kathleen Kent's ability to craft powerful stories of family from colonial history.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780316068628
Publisher: Little, Brown and Company
Publication date: 11/08/2010
Pages: 300
Product dimensions: 5.90(w) x 9.30(h) x 1.20(d)

About the Author

Kathleen Kent is the author of The Heretic's Daughter. She lives in Dallas.

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The Wolves of Andover: A Novel 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 56 reviews.
Heart2Heart More than 1 year ago
Sometimes in a man's life he must be willing to stand up against what he knows is wrong even if it means he will stand alone. In the novel, The Wolves of Andover by Kathleen Kent, you are taken back to the 1600's to the reign of King Charles I and the Cromwell's. However some of the kings back handed dealings are appealing to those that were once loyal to the crown no matter the cost. Cromwell is about to see to it that he can locate men willing to go against the crown and put King Charles I to trial. If he is found guilty the punishment is beheading. Martha Allen is a woman that believes that she should marry for love and not because of a certain age with any willing man. Yet her father is growing tired of her reluctance to find a husband and sends her to aid her cousin Patience with her child bearing as her times grows close and help around the home while her husband Daniel travels out of town to trade for goods and food. Martha believes in taking charge even if that means making men feeling uncomfortable. John and Thomas are both hired men that work for Patience and Daniel with the promise of a plot of land for their service. When the threat of wolves looms over the town, a bounty is promised for whomever can kill the wolf and it's mate. Yet what Martha sees in the quietness of Thomas and his strength is what draws her near to get to know him more. Yet Thomas may be hiding more that just secrets from everyone. I received this wonderful book from Hachette Book Groups for my honest review and must say aside from a slow beginning in understanding the characters and two different stories, give it time and the book will reward you with a very interesting turn of events that will keep you glued to the end. I would rate this one a 5 out of 5 stars. This book is available in hardcover, paperback, large print, eBook, and CD formats.
Meg-ABookishAffair More than 1 year ago
I actually did not realize that this was a prequel to Kathleen Kent's The Heretic's Daughter, a book that I read a couple years ago. I thought this was a great standalone book and if you didn't know otherwise, you wouldn't realize that there was a connection between the two books until the very end of the book. You may even want to read this book before you read The Heretic's Daughter if you haven't read it already. I really liked the story that took place in Massachusetts rather than the story on the boat. I thought the characters of Martha and Thomas and Martha's cousin's family were much more engaging than the men chasing after Thomas (they seem to do a lot of waiting and talking and that's about it). I thought that Martha was a really interesting character. At her relatively young age, she's already sort of is a old maid and she goes to her cousin's family to basically try to find a husband. In a way, I almost enjoyed this book much more than The Heretic's Daughter. Thomas' story is incredibly interesting and really opened a new part of history for me. I also liked the picture of the small settlement that the characters lived in. I really thought you got a really good picture of how the early American settlers lived and some of the dangers that they faced. Bottom line: This is a great historical fiction read.
NatalieTahoe More than 1 year ago
Kent's second book, The Wolves of Andover, takes place well before the fateful events of the Salem Witch Trial. It's the story of how Martha and Thomas Carrier met and the relationship that ultimately secured their friendship and loyalty to each other. But this is also about Thomas and the rumors whirling about him. As a Welshman and member of the Royal Guard of the King of England when he was younger, he is rumored to be the executioner of Charles I, and there is a bounty on his head. The colonies are known to have kept quiet the whereabouts of those who contributed to the rebellion against the king, those who followed Oliver Cromwell on the battlefields. But will the town remain quiet when the four thugs who are hired in London make the dangerous journey across the Atlantic to hunt down Thomas? Part of the reason why I love Kathleen Kent's books so much is that her work is unbelievably polished. Her scenes are as pure and true to how one might write and read in the 17th century, without losing any sense of its "readability" in our modern times.
Avid4books More than 1 year ago
In a word, Dreadful. If you enjoy a period novel with paragraphs full of spit, snot, vomit, viscera, entrails, and whores, this is the book for you. If not, you'll put it down like I did, after three slow, awful chapters. Not sure if the author is going for shock value, or if she believes this is how people spoke back in the 1600's.
NovelChatter More than 1 year ago
It's 1692 and the United States as we know it does not exist. We were still a group of colonies and young Martha Allen had just arrived at her cousin's home in Billerica, Massachusetts. Martha is not a guest. She's expected to help her cousin Patience through her pregnancy and also do the work of a servant around the house and the farm. Nineteen-year-old Martha is strong willed and has a sharp tongue, and will soon be an "old maid." She knows only too well the fate awaits a single woman with no place to call her own. Also working on the property is Thomas Carrier, a man rumored to be a regicide hiding in plain site in Billerica. Thomas fits the physical description of supposed executioner of Charles I. In Kathleen Kent's second book, The Wolves of Andover, we meet the young Martha whose later life story was told to us in Kent's first book, The Heretic's Daughter, which follows Martha as she stood trial at the Salem witch hunts. Author Kathleen Kent is a direct descendant of the real life Martha Allen Carrier and I believe she does her family well. These books are technically described as historical fiction, however I think that is a disservice to Kent's work. She tells a story that pays homage not only to Kent's nine times great grand-mother, Martha, but also to all of our ancestors who lived in those dangerous times and places. They knew no modern conveniences and considered surviving a tough winter or childbirth to be good fortune. The book's title, The Wolves of Andover, not only refers to the wild wolves that circle the settlements to stalk and prey on whatever they can kill, but to the wolves who walk on two feet who also stalk their unfortunate prey. Told against the background of the wilderness of "new" England, Kent spins a very readable tale of survival of the fittest, survival of the smartest, and survival of those who will not be beaten. I highly recommend The Wolves of Andover! I encourage you to get past the idea that you don't like historical fiction. This book won't disappoint. The story of Martha Allen and Thomas Carrier is in many ways the same struggle men and women face with today: how to find a place in the world in which to be happy and safe. I loved this book and these people. If I gave a star rating, I'd give this book a very strong 4 ½ stars. Source: This book was provided to me by the publisher at my request and in no way affected by review.
harstan More than 1 year ago
In the Massachusetts Bay Colony, while both worked on her cousin's farm, twenty-three years old Martha Allen falls in love with hired hand Thomas Carrier. However, she also hears the rumor that circulates about Thomas fleeing England after playing a major role in the beheading of King Charles I. Thomas saves Martha's life when wolves who stalk the farm attack her. He also learns that kidnappers have crossed the pond preferably to capture and take back to London for public trial or execute the man who killed the former monarch. These outsiders hear the rumors about Thomas living on the coast north of Boston. Although those who have read The Heretic's Daughter knows what will happen to Martha, Kathleen Kent demonstrates her skill as a great author by engaging the full attention throughout of her fans (and newcomers) in the superb prequel. The story line is action packed as the conflict between people entrenched in the Restoration come across as the status quo and those adapting to a new world order carved in a wilderness makes for a strong historical that looks deep at the darker roots of Colonial America. Harriet Klausner
amandacb on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I loved The Heretic's Daughter, but The Wolves of Andover not so much. I think it was the combination of flip-flopping between narratives and how "mysterious" the characters seemed; if a character is so mysterious I never really get to know him (or her), then I will not become invested in the novel. I actually gave up about three-fourths of the way in, which is unlike me, especially if I paid for a book (and I did this one).
iwriteinbooks on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
At nineteen, ¿old maid¿ Martha is becoming a bit of a burden on her family. Her looks aren¿t lacking but neither are her quick wit or her ability to question every and all authority figures. It is with this sentiment that she is shipped from Andover to Billerica in order, in guise, to aid her cousin with the birth of her third child and, in reality, to get her out of her parents¿ house, already. Talented as she is with housework and midwifery, Martha is not at all pleased to be at her cousin¿s every beck and call. The dull New England wilderness and her cousin¿s sharp tongue aren¿t exactly the things dreams are made of.Ah, but of course, this is the New World, we¿re in and there has to be some adventure to be found. How about that handsome Welsh servant with the rather clouded military background? What about the men who keep showing up at the doorstep asking for said hired help?Well, Martha, my dear, just stay tuned and you might find that Billerica isn¿t all that dull, after all.I was so excited to win this from Wonders and Marvels and wasn¿t totally disappointed. The writing is great, if gory at times, and Martha is just fabulous.I loved the depiction of the pre-revolutionary New England, especially because the region is so near and dear to my heart. It was fun to live through the towns of my childhood about three hundred years before I was there. I grew up in the town next to Billerica and spent my weeekends in Andover, making this story neat in a more personal way.My biggest and perhaps only, criticism was that it seemed a little bit disjointed in many places. I often had to flip back through after reading a chapter and make sure that I was literally on the right page with the rest of the story. I think, rather than bad storytelling or bad writing, it came from interweaving too many different threads together. Not an unworthy attempt but it needed to be a little bit firmed up or fleshed out or, maybe both.That should have deterred me from closing this with a positive finish but it had enough positives, and no, no0t just the location, to keep it afloat. It also became more cohesive and suddenly stronger about halfway through. I didn¿t realize that this was a companion or prequel to The Heretic¿s Daughter (now, I get that it¿s pretty hard not to, well, get it). Despite the arguments I had with the rambling, holy plot line, I would try Kent¿s first book, if only for the word weaving.
NovelChatter on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
It¿s 1692 and the United States as we know it does not exist. We were still a group of colonies and young Martha Allen had just arrived at her cousin¿s home in Billerica, Massachusetts. Martha is not a guest. She¿s expected to help her cousin Patience through her pregnancy and also do the work of a servant around the house and the farm. Nineteen-year-old Martha is strong willed and has a sharp tongue, and will soon be an ¿old maid.¿ She knows only too well the fate awaits a single woman with no place to call her own. Also working on the property is Thomas Carrier, a man rumored to be a regicide hiding in plain site in Billerica. Thomas fits the physical description of supposed executioner of Charles I.In Kathleen Kent¿s second book, The Wolves of Andover, we meet the young Martha whose later life story was told to us in Kent¿s first book, The Heretic¿s Daughter, which follows Martha as she stood trial at the Salem witch hunts. Author Kathleen Kent is a direct descendant of the real life Martha Allen Carrier and I believe she does her family well. These books are technically described as historical fiction, however I think that is a disservice to Kent¿s work. She tells a story that pays homage not only to Kent¿s nine times great grand-mother, Martha, but also to all of our ancestors who lived in those dangerous times and places. They knew no modern conveniences and considered surviving a tough winter or childbirth to be good fortune.The book¿s title, The Wolves of Andover, not only refers to the wild wolves that circle the settlements to stalk and prey on whatever they can kill, but to the wolves who walk on two feet who also stalk their unfortunate prey.Told against the background of the wilderness of ¿new¿ England, Kent spins a very readable tale of survival of the fittest, survival of the smartest, and survival of those who will not be beaten. I highly recommend The Wolves of Andover! I encourage you to get past the idea that you don¿t like historical fiction. This book won¿t disappoint. The story of Martha Allen and Thomas Carrier is in many ways the same struggle men and women face with today: how to find a place in the world in which to be happy and safe. I loved this book and these people.If I gave a star rating, I¿d give this book a very strong 4 ½ stars.Source: This book was provided to me by the publisher at my request and in no way affected by review.
BookishDame on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
"The Wolves of Andover," by Kathleen Kent is a book that is a literary triumph. It's not for lazy readers or those who expect pablum. That being said, intelligent readers will be absorbed by many points of history, symbolism, love and betrayal, and ancestrial links of this fine book. You may remember Ms Kent as the author of "Heretic's Daughter."Kathleen Kent is an academic and accomplished woman. She shares her knowledge not just of her link to one of the witches tried in the historical Salem Witch Trials, but of the mind-set and the spiritual terrors of the early colonial days in Massachusetts. 'midst this unsettling atmosphere (which Ms Kent creates so brilliantly that it makes one's heart beat faster), lurk "wolves." Wolves both real and in sheep's clothing, in human form, and in the imagination. This menacing presence tends to over-shadow the novel. I loved it and thought it was genius.While this is an historical romance novel of sorts, to call it that is to short-change it. It is rather a love story that takes place within the confines of the wilderness of the new settlements of colonial New England, within the dangerous mission of killing a wayward, annointed King of England, and within the hardships of family connections and spiritual uncertainty.As many of you know, I'm not one to spoil a book by telling you the story, which you can easily find from the book cover. I will say that this is a book that rides the ship of reality. It's a novel holding the truth of the life of Martha Allen Carrier...mother of an accused witch.Take time to read this brilliant novel.Deb/TheBookishDame
hollysing on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Contentious Martha is sharp-tongued spinster who falls in love with mysterious hired-hand Thomas Carrier after he saves her from a wolf attack. Safety is not, however, prevalent in the 17th century rugged wilderness of colonial Massachusetts. Human wolves cloaked as people living in plain sight in the surrounding area arrive in the New World to hunt the assassins of King Charles I during the Cromwell years in England. The author deftly crafted this intrigue into this historical fiction novel while Martha navigates the difficulty of being a servant her cousin¿s home.The author¿s intention to show the brutality and volatile nature of the early colonies is admirable, but the novel is dark. Depictions of everyday life such as using an injured lamb for bait and detailed descriptions of dog fighting are chilling. I respect the integration of the political ramifications brought on by the assassination of King Charles I, however felt tossed to and fro from scenes which did not exactly hang together set in England and on shipboard to colonial America. A firmer hand in editing would have benefitted the writing. Secondary characters called by various names such as ¿Duchess,¿ Keeper of the Privy Council¿ forced me to turn back to previous mentions to determine to whom the author referred. Editing the many sentences beginning with ¿it¿ would have been helpful. Most enjoyable and clearly set forth are the scenes at the Massachusetts farm with Martha and Thomas. Author Kent is a tenth generation descendent of the Carrier family. She grew up listening to stories of the Salem witch trials and reading Poe, which may explain the darkness of her writing. She calls her book a love story to her family and a tribute to those accused as being witches. Ms. Kent plays well with literary genre by mixing and morphing romance, political intrigue and historical fiction. The Wolves of Andover aroused my interest to read Ms. Kent¿s first novel, the Heretic¿s Daughter, told from the perspective of a ten-year-old daughter witnessing the witch trial of her mother.
Cariola on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The Wolves of Andover serves as a prequel to Kent's The Heretic's Daughter, but it falls a bit short. The story of Charles II's relentless pursuit of the men directly responsible for his father's beheading, even to the extent of sending assassins to find them in the American colonies, is certainly an intriguing one, and Kent does a fine job of describing the hardscrabble life of the New England settlers. What put me off was, I think, the rather stereotypical characters. Martha, the protagonist, is what one would call a "spirited" girl--in other words, the stereotypical ancestral feminist. Her cousin Patience, on the other hand, is a the stereotypical jealous harpy intent on keeping Martha--her cousin--in her inferior place. The lead baddie, Bloodlow, is crueller than cruel and meaner than mean. The Welshman, Thomas, is the strong, silent type, taller than tall, stronger than strong, silenter than silent (at least until he falls in love--then it seems he can't stop blabbing his secrets). Well, you get the picture. These are all folks I've seen before in numerous historical novels, and that familiarity makes the plot, overall, too predictable. Who wants to read a novel with so few surprises? Near the end, Kent sticks in the gratuitous but expected scene of first lovemaking (ho hum!). I could have done without the graphic description of a ruptured hymen, about which which she attempted to wax poetically. Maybe it's just me . . . maybe I needed an even longer break from historical fiction. The Wolves of Andover is certainly not a bad book, but what disappointed me most was that it had the potential to be so much better.
pak6th on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
It is 1673 in the town of Billerica, Massachusetts and an unmarried young woman is sent to her cousins home to help her with her lying in. Her status is clearly that of servant and she is angry and irascible but she does whip the household into shape. She also meets a tall man working on the farm with a mysterious past that relates to the English Civil War. The isolated settlements already have to contend with wolves which ravage their stockyards, bands of Indians intent on harm, and smallpox but now the spy network of the newly restored King Charles II reaches into the woods of Massachusetts. Part romance, part spy tale, there is fascinating history here as Kent spins a tale that is a prequel to her first novel, The Heretics Daughter.
Carolee888 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
'The Wolves of Andover" by Kathleen Kent is a prequel to 'The Heretics Daughter'. The setting is 1673 in colonial Massachusetts and also in London during the time of King Charles II¿s reign. Martha has been pushed by her father into being a servant to her cousin, Patience¿s family. She was getting past the marriageable age of the time, she was already nineteen. Her father no longer wanted to support her. Also, her father could collect all of her wages as the custom. She approached life with bluntness, had a sharp tongue and was prone to getting into arguments. She was a good worker and very independent. She would be handy when it was her cousin¿s time to deliver as she had midwifed many babies. She lost some mothers but never a baby. She was very kind and protective to children and young William felt very comfortable around her. She had the look of a survivor. A stranger named Thomas; very big in size, with a scar dividing his forehead in two, came to work for the family as laborer. He was a quiet person hiding a mysterious past and is also very independent. A secret and quiet romance starts between Thomas and Martha. The story alternates between Martha and Thomas in Massachusetts and London where Charles II is planning revenge on the person who killed his father. Since I am not familiar with this part of history, it was all new to me. Kathleen Kent used family stories and research to write about her ancestor, Martha Carrier. There is mystery, love and danger in her story. Her portrayal of Massachusetts in the 1600¿s is an additional character. You can feel the cold winter winds pierce your bones, smell the fragrant flowers of spring and glide your hands over an old leather bound book. This is historical fiction at its best and you had better bundle up before starting to read it. Now that I know who Martha and Thomas are, I am very excited to begin reading, `The Heretic¿s Daughter next. I recommend this book to all who are interested in historical fiction of early America.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was a prequel to "The Heretic's Daughter."  Although I enjoyed "The Heretic's Daughter" more, this was still a good read, and it was nice to get some background on the parents from the original book.
marilynrhea1 More than 1 year ago
I usually love colonial period novels. This novel just did not do a thing for me. I thought it was draggy, and often a little boring. I like some of Kathleen Kent's other books, so I guess this one was just an anomaly for me. I can't really recommend it, as I just did not enjoy reading it at all. I did finish it, and I can't say that I changed my mind about the book once I knew the ending.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love this novel - it made me feel like I could see, smell and taste Colonial America. I thought about the characters whenever I wasn't able to read! I highly recommend!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
OHARADN More than 1 year ago
Absolutly fabulous!!! Highly recommend!!! Please see my full recommendation under the title "The Traitor's Wife"
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
historybugLH More than 1 year ago
Kent does it again. I love good historical fiction. Like Heretic's Daughter, Kent takes you back to colonial New England to explore her family stories. I like the way she develops her characters by throwing them in to the emtional vortex of the time. It make me wonder what my ancestors had to endure to get me to the 21st century. Martha...you go girl!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago