Winds of Fate (Mage Winds Series #1)

Winds of Fate (Mage Winds Series #1)

by Mercedes Lackey

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Overview

New York Times bestselling author Mercedes Lackey has enchanted readers since the publication of her first novel, Arrows of the Queen. Now she takes readers on another thrilling journey with the first novel in her Mage Winds series...

High magic had been lost to Valdemar when he gave his life to save his kingdom from destruction by the dark sorceries. Now it falls to Elspeth Herald, heir to the throne, to take up the challenge and seek a mentor who will awaken her mage abilities.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781101127858
Publisher: DAW
Publication date: 07/07/1992
Series: Valdemar: Mage Winds Series , #1
Sold by: Penguin Group
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 464
Sales rank: 35,374
File size: 2 MB
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Mercedes Lackey is a full-time writer and has published numerous novels and works of short fiction, including the bestselling Heralds of Valdemar series. She is also a professional lyricist and a licensed wild bird rehabilitator. She lives in Oklahoma with her husband, artist Larry Dixon, and their flock of parrots.

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Winds of Fate (Mage Winds Series #1) 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 112 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I bought all of the early Valdemar books and noticed more typos that usual from the very first book. Unfortunately, each book just seems to be getting worse. This one is almost unreadable. Sometimes I literally can't figure out what a sentence means because of typos and spelling errors, so I have to guess from context or check my paperback copy. Takes all of the fun out of reading.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This edition of the book has many typos caused by sloppy OCR and shoddy editing. Every couple of pages merec instead of merc, or meres and so on.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
While I love Mercedes Lackey's books, the publishers should be ashamed of releasing this version of an ebook. It was riddled with typos and misspellings, and the font styles (such as italics used when the person is mindspeaking) would change mid-sentence. I bought all 3 of the Winds of Fate books and By the Sword at the same time and all 4 books had the same problem. It was very obvious that no one bothered to proofread the books when they were converted to a digital format, even a main character's name was misspelled! I may buy Mercedes Lackey's newer books as they are released, but I will not be buying any of her older books, even though I really want them, until there's some indication that the quality has improved dramatically.
SunnySD on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Elspeth comes into her own. With Valdemar threatened by Ancar and whatever barrier to magic the kingdom possessed beginning to fail, Elspeth sets out to find what may be Valdemar's only hope: mages.As the Heir, a Herald, and a well-trained swordswoman with a mage-possessed blade, she feels she's the best for the task and hopes to have little trouble finding an adept-class mage or two to agree to return to Valdemar with her. Of course, you just know it's not going to be that simple.Meanwhile, far, far away among the Tayledras, the legendary Hawk Brothers, one young ex-mage turned forest scout is facing his own set of seemingly insurmountable problems.A good solid story. My only quibble? Skif comes across as slightly whiny and unexpectedly jealous - out of character for the man who championed Talia so valiantly. Both Elspeth and Darkwind are a bit more wooden than I'd have expected given Lackey's usual dab hand with her characters. Still enjoyable, though.
LisaMaria_C on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
If you're new to Lackey and the Valdemir series, I wouldn't being with this book: I don't think the book, or the trilogy it is a part of is the strongest in this series, and it would be a spoiler for the earlier trilogy that starts with Arrows of the Queen. Go back and read those first, and if you like them, I think you'll enjoy this tale of Elspeth, a character in earlier books, coming into her own. I enjoy Lackey's "Vows and Honors" series as well with Tarma and Kethry, and in the precursor to this book, By the Sword she melds the two series. So I'd recommend reading those, too, beginning with The Oathbound because for me a lot of the fun of this book is how Elspeth deal with the demanding sword, Need, that is important in those books. I also enjoyed how this book opened up the world Lackey created, with Elspeth in her quest having to deal with the Tayledras, an interesting magical world in its own right. A good read and a good beginning to an enjoyable trilogy.
surreality on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Plot: The book consists of two plots that only interlink in the last few chapters. The quest plot is predictable and doesn't come with any real highlights or tension-filled moments. Same goes for the second plot that mostly consists of depicting life in a magic-laden environment. The story suffers from very little action in both plots - the final fight isn't set up well and is done in rather anticlimatic ways. Nothing is really resolved at the end of the book.Characters: Compared to other heroines in the Lackey-verse, Elspeth is suprisingly unperfect. She's still a Mary Sue, but it could have been much worse and she can be likable. Darkwind is trickier since his plot is so determined to be mysterious that a lot of his past is never clear either, so his motivations are not clear and he falls flat as far as characterization goes. The rest of Elspeth's plot's characters are a show of "let's see how so-and-so is doing", with practically no-one new introduced and the known figures not developed any further than they were in previous books. Darkwind gets a few stereotypes to play with, plus an incompetent crazed villain.Style: Simple writing that is suited to a young adult audience. What is odd are the scene lengths - minor scenes can stretch out over pages, while major scenes are regularly cut short and summed up. Same goes for dialogue, especially when information is imparted that way. The less interesting and important the information, the longer the dialogue. Plus: As far as Lackey books go, this is a fairly grown-up one with very little fawning over the pretty horsies. Minus: The plot feels unfinished and makes the story drag. No temporary conclusion at the end. Summary: A Lackey book with relatively little drama, romance or horse-snogging. Overall an average read.
Bibliotropic on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
There are two real parts, by my way of figuring, to the Valdemar continuum. There's the main story, the 'modern' stuff, which is written about in the Arrows trilogy, the Winds trilogy, and the Storms trilogy. The rest is history, elaboration of side stories, and all the other books that make up the tapestry of the history of Velgarth. But those three trilogies all take place around the same time period, involving the same characters, and are interlinked so that they're the central column of the Valdemar series.Winds of Fate is the first book of the Wind trilogy, and the one where Lackey takes back her original vow of not having large casts and not having magic be central to the Valdemar stories. After first having been introduced to the character of Elspeth in the Arrows books, we now see her grown up, willful and stubborn, and facing her destiny as the first Herald-Mage since Vanyel. Not only that, but she's the one who gives herself the task of going out and finding somebody to train Valdemaran mages, in an effort to defend Valdemar against Ancar of Hardorn's attacks.No easy feat.Interwoven with Elspeth's part of the story is that of Darkwind, Tayledras mage-turned-scout, who's trying to defend a weakened Vale against threats from both outside and in.Naturally, the stories converge, they end up meeting, and Darkwind is just the one to train Elspeth in the art and science of magic.It's not exactly a surprise when that happens, but it's still all interesting to read about.If there's one thing that Lackey is skilled at, it's making a rich and interesting world, and in providing a wonderful amount of detail about the various cultures within. In this book alone, we see glimpses of life as a highborn Valdemaran, a Shin'a'in shaman, a Rethwellan mage, various Tayledras, and some who don't fit into any real category except perhaps "exotic misfit", and seeing their lives from their point of view, even for a short chapter, is always interesting.The Winds trilogy is not my favourite, but I can't deny that it's good, it's engaging, it's deep and developped, and it's an integral part of the story that is Valdemar.
jackelly on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Liked it, not as much as Arrow's of the Queen trilogy. I really enjoy Elspeth and Darkwind's characters.
jjmcgaffey on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I really enjoy this book. I've read it half a dozen times, easily. That does make it a little hard to review - I have to remember where this book stops, in the story. So...This is Elspeth's story - Princess Brat has grown up, in several meanings of the term. And as she reaches an age to start acting on her own, Valdemar faces a new crisis in the war with Hardorn - their ancient defenses against magic are weakening, faster than the forgetting-about-magic part of it. There are magic attacks being made within Valdemar - within Haven itself - and too many of the people who should be devising defenses are literally unable to remember that magic is any more than a bards' tale for more than a day or two. Elspeth seems to be immune to this, or at least less bound by it; this, among other things, convinces her that she needs to be the one to go out and find them a mage who can help them devise defenses, and possibly even find Heralds and others who have the Mage-gift and can be trained. She more-or-less gets her way, and heads out accompanied by her Companion, Skif and his Companion, and the sword Need. Things are going along swimmingly...and then Elspeth decides, apparently accurately, that she's being herded along the path of Destiny, and she wants no part of it. Then things start getting interesting.Alternate chapters of the book, from the beginning, have been telling the story of Darkwind, a Hawkbrother from a clan that's in serious trouble. They're under overt and covert attack by a powerful, evil mage, and some of his early work against them is harming them now. Darkwind, with help from various sources, has just figured out what sort of attack is being made on them, and stopped one of the primary weakening agents - when these weird people all in white show up and claim that they want to help in return for lessoning in magic. Oh, did I mention that Elspeth turns out to have a very strong mage-gift herself? The book ends with a semi-successful ambush of the evil mage, and Darkwind agreeing to teach Elspeth as he renews his own lessons. Next, please!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
well+written%2C+you+come+to++care+about+the+characters.++
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I loved where this story line went, I can't wait to read the next book!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Cool
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Leader:FangStar.
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