The White Company

The White Company

by Arthur Conan Doyle

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Overview

A historical adventure set during the Hundred Years' War. The story follows a young man as he leaves the shelter of an abbey in England and becomes involved with Edward, the Black Prince's campaign in Spain. Doyle later wrote a prequel, titled "Sir Nigel", concerning the early life of one of the heroes in this novel.



“We go to France, and from thence I trust to Spain, in humble search of a field in which we may win advancement and perchance some small share of glory. For this purpose I would have you know that it is not my wont to let any occasion pass where it is in any way possible that honor may be gained. I would have you bear this in mind, and give great heed to it that you may bring me word of all cartels, challenges, wrongs, tyrannies, infamies, and wronging of damsels. Nor is any occasion too small to take note of, for I have known such trifles as the dropping of a gauntlet, or the flicking of a breadcrumb, when well and properly followed up, lead to a most noble spear-running.”



- Sir Nigel, “The White Company”

Product Details

BN ID: 2940148489658
Publisher: Tower Publishing
Publication date: 03/24/2009
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
File size: 1 MB

About the Author

Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle, DL (22 May 1859 – 7 July 1930) was a Scottish author most noted for his stories about the detective Sherlock Holmes, which are generally considered a major innovation in the field of crime fiction, and the adventures of Professor Challenger. He was a prolific writer whose other works include science fiction stories, historical novels, plays and romances, poetry, and non-fiction. Conan was originally a given name, but Doyle used it as part of his surname in his later years. Source: Wikipedia

Date of Birth:

May 22, 1859

Date of Death:

July 7, 1930

Place of Birth:

Edinburgh, Scotland

Place of Death:

Crowborough, Sussex, England

Education:

Edinburgh University, B.M., 1881; M.D., 1885

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The White Company. 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 25 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Although not as well-known as the Sherlock Holmes series, this may be one of Doyles best works. It really defines the genre of medival adventure romances. Not as difficult to read as the Mort d'Arthur and his settings and characters are better defined than Stevenson's the Black Arrow. I only wish he'd written more books of this type.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
FrugalChariot More than 1 year ago
The creator of Sherlock Holmes penned this novel of Sir Nigel, an old diminutive knight who ventures out to battle the French. You'd be hard-pressed to find a pluckier, more noble character in all literature.
Mouldywarp on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Hilarious! - but surely not meant to be taken seriously as a historical novel.
nesum on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A very fun adventure of two men who leave a monastery (one in disgrace and one in triumph) and end up joining a company of archers on its way to France. For most of the book, we follow the group in good-hearted encounters, only culminating in dramatic battle. Quite an enjoyable book.
librisissimo on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Substance: A romance of the old style, with a naive young man released from the monastery where he was raised to spend a year in the world before taking vows, if he still chooses. It is clear from this story of war and love that he won't. Barring a few instances where transitions from peril to safety lack some essential continuity, most of the episodes are entertaining.Style: Doyle throws around terms of heraldry and history with mad abandon. He does not gloss over the unseemly aspects of life in the Middle Ages, but stays on the high ground. A mild humor (also evident in the Holmes canon) runs as an undercurrent throughout the work.
Terpsichoreus on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A delightful and strange adventure story in the vein of The Three Musketeers or The Scarlet Pimpernel, but also an early foreshadow of the Mannerpunk genre which grew out of Peake's Gormenghast books.The well-researched text creates a believable world which is undoubtedly (and delightfully) removed from the modern. Not only does Doyle (of Sherlock Holmes fame) create a fairly accurate portrait of ever-warring Feudal Europe, but at least proposes a psychological type for the soldiers of the time.Of course, to take such a type from (even contemporary) works is a bit of a silly falsehood, and with characteristic British whimsy, Doyle births a cast which seems realistic not despite but because of its deep-seated eccentricity. Of course, it is precisely this method which will grip Peake (in the wake of Chekhov) in his surrealistic works.Though once quite popular, this tale has become somewhat less well-known, perhaps because it is easy to take from it a stance of bravado, militarism, and anglocentrism. Perhaps there will come to us a dissolving of such strong self-identifications with such things that people will no longer feel a need to oppose fictional portrayals, and Doyle and Kipling may return with a grain of salt.
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