Vanishing Girl (Boy Sherlock Holmes Series #3)

Vanishing Girl (Boy Sherlock Holmes Series #3)

by Shane Peacock

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Overview

The third case in the compelling Boy Sherlock Holmes series is full of as many twists and turns as the backstreets of Victorian London.

When a wealthy young girl vanishes as if by magic in Hyde Park, Sherlock is once again driven to prove himself. In a heart-stopping race against time, an innocent boy’s survival depends on Sherlock’s ability to solve the mysterious puzzle of the Vanishing Girl. As complex as the maze that protects the missing girl’s hiding place, this case takes Sherlock racing to the countryside, the coast, and into the lair of a menagerie of exotic, dangerous creatures.

Haunted by memories of his shattered family, goaded by his enemies, driven to heal the fragile relationship between him and the beautiful Irene Doyle, Sherlock makes an almost fatal mistake. In the end, his brilliant powers of deduction and the steadfast eccentric Sigerson Bell save the day. Soon, very soon, the world will come to know him as the master detective of all time.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781770492349
Publisher: Tundra
Publication date: 10/12/2010
Series: Boy Sherlock Holmes Series , #3
Pages: 336
Product dimensions: 5.10(w) x 7.60(h) x 0.90(d)
Age Range: 10 - 14 Years

About the Author

Shane Peacock was born in Thunder Bay, Ontario, and grew up in Kapuskasing. A biographer, journalist, and screenwriter, he is also the author of several novels and plays. He has received many honors for his writing, including the prestigious Arthur Ellis Award for Eye of the Crow, the first of his Boy Sherlock Holmes series. Shane Peacock lives with his wife and three children near Cobourg, Ontario.

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Vanishing Girl 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 15 reviews.
GRgenius on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
It started off slow, drawing my interest along like a new puppy on a leash. The author knew where he was leading me, the reader, but I couldn't see the sense of it all just yet. By books end I was thoroughly engrossed and waiting to see if the final reveal was anything along the lines of what I imagined. (Psst....it was and then some!) Though this was the third book in a series of which I have not read the prior installments, I was still able to enjoy the story on the whole...but it does make one curious to know how exactly things arrived at the stage they are presented. A great way to get acquainted with Sherlock Holmes before diving into the classic novels of litereture past. Recommended read for all ages...and a work out for the mind to discover just who what when and where things occured! Happy reading...
zzshupinga on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
There are a couple of different ways to look at this book. The first is imagine that the main character, Sherlock Holmes, is actually named something else entirely. In which case the book is a decent detective story with mildly interesting characters. There are a couple of plot holes and rather lengthy passages that seemingly have nothing to do with the plot of the story, but overall is fairly easy to follow. The major drawback is that its a book in a series and you're introduced to characters and have mentions of other plots thrown at you, but no clue as to the real relationship they have with the characters.Reading the book as a Sherlock Holmes story, is a bit different. All of the above remain true, but there are other exasperating questions thrown in, the details of which seem to have been pulled from no where in the Sherlock chronology. For example, at a few different points in the story the insult of "Jew boy" is thrown out and "half breed". There's no explanation given in this novel as to why those are the insults of choice, but even more exasperating to a fan of the Holmes mythology is...why is he referred to as Jewish? Basically all this character has in common with Sherlock Holmes is the name and heightened powers of deduction. In short, if you're a fan of Sherlock Holmes avoid the book. If you're looking for just a mystery to read and don't really care about Sherlock Holmes then the book isn't terrible.
mamzel on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is the third of The Boy Sherlock Holmes series and it continues to follow the growth of the alienated, genius, orphan Sherlock Holmes. One of the positive things about this series is the setting - Victorian London - and the reader is given a glimpse of life in the streets at the time. Sherlock is living with an apothecary who recognizes the boy's talents of observation and intelligence. He is also giving him martial arts training which Sherlock is already finding useful.In this case, Sherlock is looking into the kidnapping of the daughter of a very wealthy man as a way to achieve fame and recognition. The case is not so difficult for the reader to solve, especially since the first chapter is named "Doppelganger."I have read the first two books of the series and I am enjoying the growth of young Sherlock.
aya.herron on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is the third installment in a YA series featuring Sherlock Holmes as a teen. "Vanishing Girl" follows Holmes on a quest to solve the case of missing socialite, Victoria Rathbone, before Scotland Yard or his arch enemy Malefactor can find her. The young lad is discouraged when at first it seems that Scotland Yard has bested him, but then he notices and overlooked detail in the ransom note. Perhaps it is a clue? Holmes decides to follow up on it even though it may be a long shot. When Victoria appears to have been kidnapped a second time, Holmes is hot on the trail. Will he win the fame he so covets? The ending may surprise you.This is an excellent mystery with lots of twists and turns. The relationships between Holmes, Irene Doyle, Malefactor and the young Lastrade deserve mentioning. Their interactions are filled with rivalry and teenage angst which young adults can relate to. Also, this mystery takes place during a dark period in the young man's life, his mother having recently died. We find Holmes living at Sigerson Bell's apothecary. The eccentric Bell is both a mentor and father figure to the young lad which adds to the development of Holmes¿ character.The Bottom Line: This is a fast paced mystery with lots of adventure and thrills. It is not necessary to have read the books in order. Background information is readily supplied so you can start with any book in the series. This clever book is great fun to read. I'm looking forward to reading the others, and I hope to find them under the tree this Christmas. Highly recommended for mystery fans of all ages, but especially for young adults ages 13 and up.
callmecayce on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The third book in the Boy Sherlock Holmes series. I really liked this one, it's the best so far. I like Sherlock's relationships with Malefactor, Irene and Lestrade Jr. I think Peacock does an excellent job introducing us to the possible choices Sherlock made which resulted in his eccentric and detached behavior. I cannot wait for the next book in the series.
troubleinbaboonbutt on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Vanishing Girl by Shane Peacock was the last book in the 3 book series The Boy Sherlock Homes. There is nothing to go on. There has been no communication from the captors. The girl that is being held captive is Irene Doyle¿s cousin Victoria Rathbone. Victoria is also the daughter of Lord Rathbone who is a very powerful individual in Society.
HollyMS on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Vanishing Girl is the 3rd book in the Boy Sherlock Holmes series, by Canadian author Shane Peacock. I haven't read the 1st or 2nd books, but I have read the 4th one. It seems that I'm reading them backwards! I generally enjoyed the 4th book of the series, but I liked the 3rd one even more. I think the series grows on you, after awhile. Vanishing Girl is a really good and interesting mystery book for intermediate or young adult readers. I'm in my early twenties, and I still really enjoyed it.Vanishing Girl deals with a case that involves the kidnapping of an aristocrat's daughter. The outcome was somewhat predictable, but it was still a fun book. It's interesting to see Shane Peacock's take on a young Sherlock Holmes, and purists may not be happy, but it's a good introduction for younger readers.
AnnRig on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Sherlock Holmes as a boy-- I had not read the first two books of the series, but didn't think reading the third book first was a serious problem, like in other series books. The characters were well developed and I enjoyed the portrayal of the young Sherlock Holmes. The plot of the story was a little predictable, but upper elementary and middle school students who like myteries will like this book. The series would be a good introduction to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes for younger readers.
Bitter_Grace on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Shane Peacock's series is an intelligent, finely crafted account of Sherlock Holmes' beginnings as a detective. The books really set the stage for Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's adult sleuth, describing Sherlock's motives to solve crimes, his early interests in chemistry and martial arts, and the reasons for his solitary nature. I love the little presages like Sherlock's rumination that it would be nice to have a male contemporary to share his adventures with (enter Watson!). I would say that the only thing lacking is Holmes' trademark strident humour, but Peacock chronicles a fairly dark time in the detective's life, so the morose attitude is perhaps more fitting. In the meantime, the apothecary Sigerson Bell provides plenty of humour as a wonderful, outrageous, and lovable character who is a sort of father figure to Sherlock, as well as his teacher and confidante.In Vanishing Girl, Sherlock must not only solve the disappearance of an upper class girl, but must also resolve all the conflicting motives in his head: his quest for justice, his desire for recognition, his feelings for Irene Doyle, and his sympathy for the small boy who will most benefit from the recovery of the kidnapped girl. The crime is not as simple as it first seems, and Peacock deftly leads the reader through the twists and turns of the plot. Some aspects of the mystery are fairly predictable, but there are enough red herrings and unexpected outcomes that the ending is still entertaining. Also, Peacock gives Sherlock so much depth of character, such a believable balance of flaws and redeeming characteristics, that you never quite know until the end what his course of action will be. I will definitely be reading the next book!
avanders on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
It is quickly apparent why Peacock's works have won him several awards. Vanishing Girl is the third in a young adult series establishing Sherlock Holmes' detective career and prowess. I had not read the first two when I received this book. Although it would have added a little bit of clarity to the past referenced throughout, it is certainly not necessary to have read the other books before enjoying the third.In Vanishing Girl, Holmes attempts to beat Scotland Yard to the solution of the kidnapping and burglary crimes. In the process of discovering the answers and solving the riddles, Holmes learns more about himself as a young man, as a friend, and as a detective. He employs many of the technical skills he has begun to learn to solve the crimes, but the real reward arrives when he learns what kind of person he will choose to be.Peacock weaves a believable and solvable mystery around a great story of a young man with a troubled past and a complicated future. I was drawn into the mystery and its facets, but I was even more taken by Holmes, his guardian Bell, his friend Irene, and all of the minor characters that plotted the story. I look forward to reading more of the books in this series.Highly recommended for all young adult readers, mystery readers, and Holmes fans.
JRlibrary on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Vanishing Girl continues the series of books involving a young Sherlock Holmes. Sherlock is still a boy, and realizes that solving the case of the missing Victoria would make him one of the world's greatest detectives, due to the publicity associated with Lord Rathbone, an aristocrat. In true Sherlock Holmes fashion, when a ransome notes arrives, he manages to observe something unnoticed by anyone else, and that is what leads him to a solution.If you haven't been reading the books in order, you don't have to read the first two in order to appreciate this one, but I would, just for the enjoyment of a well crafted mystery.
ShellyPYA on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Another adventure in the life of a young Sherlock Holmes, this time involving a kidnapped society girl. Holmes thinks he's discovered where she's being held but is baffled the next day when she is discovered by the police in a totally different area of England. When her family's house is robbed, it only baffles Holmes even more. So when she's kidnapped a second time, he vows to discover the real truth and show up Inspector Lestrade.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book and the others in the series are what I call KEEPERS. Ones you will want to read over and over again.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
avanders More than 1 year ago
It is quickly apparent why Peacock's works have won him several awards. Vanishing Girl is the third in a young adult series establishing Sherlock Holmes' detective career and prowess. I had not read the first two when I received this book. Although it would have added a little bit of clarity to the past referenced throughout, it is certainly not necessary to have read the other books before enjoying the third. In Vanishing Girl, Holmes attempts to beat Scotland Yard to the solution of the kidnapping and burglary crimes. In the process of discovering the answers and solving the riddles, Holmes learns more about himself as a young man, as a friend, and as a detective. He employs many of the technical skills he has begun to learn to solve the crimes, but the real reward arrives when he learns what kind of person he will choose to be. Peacock weaves a believable and solvable mystery around a great story of a young man with a troubled past and a complicated future. I was drawn into the mystery and its facets, but I was even more taken by Holmes, his guardian Bell, his friend Irene, and all of the minor characters that plotted the story. I look forward to reading more of the books in this series. Highly recommended for all young adult readers, mystery readers, and Holmes fans.