Unprejudiced Palate: Classic Thoughts on Food and the Good Life

Unprejudiced Palate: Classic Thoughts on Food and the Good Life

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Overview

First issued in 1948, when soulless minute steaks and quick casseroles were becoming the norm, The Unprejudiced Palate inspired a seismic culinary shift in how America eats. Written by a food-loving immigrant from Tuscany, this memoir-cum-cookbook articulates the Italian American vision of the good life: a backyard garden, a well-cooked meal shared with family and friends, and a passion for ingredients and cooking that nourish the body and the soul.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780812971552
Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
Publication date: 08/09/2005
Series: Modern Library Food Series
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 272
Product dimensions: 5.20(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.60(d)

About the Author

Angelo Pellegrini was born in 1904 in Cassabianca, Italy, and came to United States when he was ten years old. He graduated from the University of Washington, where he also received a PhD in English literature and was a professor of literature. His first book, The Unprejudiced Palate, was published in 1948, and was followed by Immigrant’s Return in 1951, Americans by Choice in 1956, and Wine and the Good Life in 1965. In 1946, Pellegrini published a recipe for pesto in Sunset magazine, which was likely the first introduction of the sauce into American culinary culture. He died in 1991.

Ruth Reichl is the bestselling author of the memoirs Garlic and SapphiresTender at the Bone, and Comfort Me with Apples and the novel Delicious! She was editor in chief of Gourmet magazine for ten years. She lives in upstate New York with her husband and two cats.

Mario Batali’s world now encompasses three New York City restaurants—Babbo, Lupa, and Esca—as well as a wine store, the Italian Wine Merchant. He has several television credits, including the Food Network's popular Molto Mario, as well as Mario Batali Eats Italy. He lives in New York City with his wife and two sons.

Read an Excerpt

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Excerpted from "The Unprejudiced Palate"
by .
Copyright © 2005 Angelo M. Pellegrini.
Excerpted by permission of Random House Publishing Group.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

What People are Saying About This

Daniel Bouloud

Angelo Pellegrini’s very personal view of cookery in America in the late forties is erudite, fascinating and at times screamingly funny. His descriptions of his Italian family’s favorite dishes are so complete that they might as well be recipes, each more delicious sounding than the next.

Jessica Harris

The Unprejudiced Palate is a savory treat that, like a fine wine or good stinky cheese, has improved with age.
—(Jessica Harris, author of The Africa Cookbook and Beyond Gumbo)

David Rosengarten

Angelo Pellegrini remains undoubtedly one of America's greatest food writers. But The Unprejudiced Palate is not just about cooking; it's about taking the time to slow down and savor life. This delightful classic is a must read for those who live in our fast-food nation.
—(David Rosengarten, author of It’s All American Food, The Dean and DeLuca Cookbook and Taste)

Mark Kurlansky

The Unprejudiced Palate is a forgotten gem from what might be remembered as the Golden Age of American food writing. This Italian born, beloved Seattle professor, friend and colleague of MFK Fisher, wrote with charm, wit, and a rare intelligence about food.
—(Mark Kurlansky, author of Salt, Cod, 1968)

Jacques Pépin

Like great dishes, great writing remains in our memory forever. Angelo Pellegrini's The Unprejudiced Palate is a lesson in how to enjoy life in an elegant and highly civilized way.

From the Publisher

“I have always thought that Angelo Peligrini misnamed his charming but opinionated book.  It should have been called the Prejudiced Palate, because he is so absolutely sure and unwavering in his vision of how to live a beautiful and delicious life. And I think he’s right.”
 –Alice Waters, Owner, Chez Panisse

"Like great dishes, great writing remains in our memory forever. Angelo Pellegrini's THE UNPREJUDICED PALATE is a lesson in how to enjoy life in an elegant and highly civilized way."
 – Jacques Pépin

"Angelo Pellegrini remains undoubtedly one of America's greatest food writers. But THE UNPREJUDICED PALATE is not just about cooking; it's about taking the time to slow down and savor life. This delightful classic is a must read for those who live in our fast-food nation."
 –David Rosengarten, author of  It’s All American Food, The Dean and DeLuca Cookbook and Taste

"THE UNPREJUDICED PALATE is a forgotten gem from what might be remembered as the Golden Age of American food writing. This Italian born, beloved Seattle professor, friend and colleague of MFK Fisher, wrote with charm, wit, and a rare intelligence about food."
Mark Kurlansky, author of Salt, Cod, 1968

“Angelo Pellegrini’s very personal view of cookery in America in the late forties is erudite, fascinating and at times screamingly funny.  His descriptions of his Italian family’s favorite dishes are so complete that they might as well be recipes, each more delicious sounding than the next”
Daniel Bouloud

“THE UNPREJUDICED PALATE is a savory treat that, like a fine wine or good stinky cheese, has improved with age”
Jessica Harris, author of The Africa Cookbook and Beyond Gumbo

Alice Waters

Alice Waters, Owner, Chez Panisse
I have always thought that Angelo Peligrini misnamed his charming but opinionated book. It should have been called the Prejudiced Palate, because he is so absolutely sure and unwavering in his vision of how to live a beautiful and delicious life. And I think he’s right.

Customer Reviews

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Unprejudiced Palate: Classic Thoughts on Food and the Good Life 4.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Jayesee More than 1 year ago
I am thrilled that this book has gone into another print. It is so timeless and relevant to life.
JonathanGorman on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Very interesting book. The focus is on how American react to foods from the perspective of someone who was immigrated at some point in the early 20th century. The book itself is about 60 years old at this point, but it feels like it could have been written yesterday. If you like reading about food, pick this one up. I'm very tempted to purchase a copySome rough highlights:* We have a lot of food, but we seem to be at a loss at what to do with it.* He really stresses trying to grow more of our own food. Grow what you cannot find in your stores. Things like unusual peppers and fruits, herbs that wilt quickly, salad greens. He's got lots of advice for how to also do it by combining food plants with decorative books. So far it's one of the better books I've read on gardening.* Americans have a love and hate relationship with alcohol. The author describes getting rude looks for taking a shot of alcohol with breakfast, but is mystified by long cocktail parties with sugary strong drinks and little food. He also has a rather relaxed approach to teaching his kids to drink. They get watered down wine, if they want. Not surprisingly, he also recommends creating your own wine. His 150 gallon system might be a bit much for some folks though.
SignoraEdie on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A blend of memoir, discourse on living, memories of Italy, gardening and recipes. How much better can it get!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago