Troubadour

Troubadour

by Mary Hoffman

NOOK Book(eBook)

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Overview

A dramatic historical thriller from the acclaimed author Mary Hoffman.

Mary Hoffman is an acclaimed children's author and critic. She is the author of the internationally bestselling picture book Amazing Grace. Her Stravaganza series for Bloomsbury has a huge fanbase and its own fan forum. In addition to her writing, Mary is the editor of Armadillo, a children's literature review magazine. She has three grown-up children, and lives with her husband in West Oxfordshire, England.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781599907703
Publisher: Bloomsbury USA
Publication date: 02/01/2011
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 304
File size: 3 MB
Age Range: 12 Years

About the Author

MARY HOFFMAN is the author of the first three Stravaganza books, as well as The Falconer's Knot, Troubadour, and the international bestseller, Amazing Grace. Mary has often traveled to research the settings for her many books set in Italy. She has three grown children, and lives with her husband in England.
maryhoffman.co.uk



bookmavenmary.blogspot.com





Customer Reviews

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Troubadour: Eine Geschichte von Liebe und Krieg 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
AdamBourke More than 1 year ago
Troubadour is an interesting book, that readers of most genres should enjoy. It is written fairly simply, in the sense that it is an easy book to read. The vocabulary isn't particularly difficult, and any period terms are generally explained in the prose (with a handy glossary at the back in case you forget). In fact there was only one problem that I had with the historical aspects if the book, and that was the definition of France. In my mind, France is as it is defined now. But according to the map in the book, the south of France was a region known as Occitania. Now this in itself isn't a problem, but it would have been nice to have known this at the BEGINNING of the book. Consequently, "the French were attacking" confused me, given that I was under the impression it was a civil war. But other than this slight confusion, I found myself enjoying learning history while reading a novel. Of course it's not perfectly accurate, it's fiction, but it was an interesting experience, that I'd be happy to repeat. In fact, I really loved the first two parts (of three). The third part however, feels rushed, sometimes unrealistic and somehow wrong. Obviously the war had to be won by the historical victor, but the fictional main character's end-story seems to disregard many of the threads that began the book, particularly what I would consider the main one, the love interest. But before this final part, the feelings and emotions of the two main characters, Elinor and Bertran, are acutely described, and they seem to be very real people. So while this book isn't in my normal reading genre, it has left an impression in my mind that perhaps I should read more historical fiction. The plot weakened towards the end, which was disappointing, but the first two parts, in my mind, more than made up for that. If you can't stand a book with a weak ending, this probably isn't for you, but if you read to appreciate a good writer, then buy/borrow/steal* this book as soon as possible. *Do NOT steal the book, that was a joke.
AdamBourke on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Troubadour is an interesting book, that readers of most genres should enjoy. It is written fairly simply, in the sense that it is an easy book to read. The vocabulary isn't particularly difficult, and any period terms are generally explained in the prose (with a handy glossary at the back in case you forget).In fact there was only one problem that I had with the historical aspects if the book, and that was the definition of France. In my mind, France is as it is defined now. But according to the map in the book, the south of France was a region known as Occitania. Now this in itself isn't a problem, but it would have been nice to have known this at the BEGINNING of the book. Consequently, "the French were attacking" confused me, given that I was under the impression it was a civil war.But other than this slight confusion, I found myself enjoying learning history while reading a novel. Of course it's not perfectly accurate, it's fiction, but it was an interesting experience, that I'd be happy to repeat. In fact, I really loved the first two parts (of three).The third part however, feels rushed, sometimes unrealistic and somehow wrong. Obviously the war had to be won by the historical victor, but the fictional main character's end-story seems to disregard many of the threads that began the book, particularly what I would consider the main one, the love interest.But before this final part, the feelings and emotions of the two main characters, Elinor and Bertran, are acutely described, and they seem to be very real people.So while this book isn't in my normal reading genre, it has left an impression in my mind that perhaps I should read more historical fiction. The plot weakened towards the end, which was disappointing, but the first two parts, in my mind, more than made up for that. If you can't stand a book with a weak ending, this probably isn't for you, but if you read to appreciate a good writer, then buy/borrow/steal* this book as soon as possible.*Do NOT steal the book, that was a joke.
ComaCalm on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
From the back of the book: Elinor is in love with Bertran, a troubadour. But her parents will not hear of the match and Elinor is to be married to an elderly nobleman. Fearing the prospect of an unhappy and loveless marriage, she flees her castle to find Bertran, unaware that southern France is on the eve of a terrible war...This is one of the most incredibly boring stories I have ever read. Essentially it¿s a history lesson with a very clichéd plot that is barely mentioned due to every other paragraph just going on about the war. I love history but I nearly fell asleep, ended up skim reading the last 100 pages (didn¿t miss anything important, story ended exactly how I expected).Elinor is a very spoilt character, naturally I can understand why a 13 year old girl wouldn¿t want to marry a guy in his forties but the way she tries (unsuccessfully) to commit suicide was rather hilarious. I should point out to anyone who¿s like `OMG PEADOPHILE!¿ that it was the custom then for a man (a noble one at least) not to marry until his thirties and usually he married someone half his age.The role of a Joglar, or a Joglaresa was one of the most interesting parts of the book but unfortunately even this failed to entertain me.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A good book, but it tends to get a little slow at times.