To Ride Hell's Chasm

To Ride Hell's Chasm

by Janny Wurts

Paperback(Reissue)

$8.06 $8.95 Save 10% Current price is $8.06, Original price is $8.95. You Save 10%.
View All Available Formats & Editions
Choose Expedited Shipping at checkout for guaranteed delivery by Thursday, August 29

Overview

An epic fantasy standalone novel from the author of the stunning Wars of Light and Shadow series. When Princess Anja fails to appear at her betrothal banquet, the tiny, peaceful kingdom of Sessalie is plunged into intrigue.When Princess Anja fails to appear at her betrothal banquet, the tiny, peaceful kingdom of Sessalie is plunged into intrigue. Two warriors are charged with recovering the distraught king's beloved daughter. Taskin, Commander of the Royal Guard, whose icy competence and impressive life-term as the Crown's right-hand man command the kingdom's deep-seated respect; and Mykkael, the rough-hewn newcomer who has won the post of Captain of the Garrison – a scarred veteran with a deadly record of field warfare, whose 'interesting' background and foreign breeding are held in contempt by court society.As the princess's trail vanishes outside the citadel's gates, anxiety and tension escalate. Mykkael's investigations lead him to a radical explanation for the mystery, but he finds himself under suspicion from the court factions. Will Commander Taskin's famous fair-mindedness be enough to unravel the truth behind the garrison captain's dramatic theory: that the resourceful, high-spirited princess was not taken by force, but fled the palace to escape a demonic evil?

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780007101115
Publisher: HarperCollins UK
Publication date: 08/01/2009
Edition description: Reissue
Pages: 704
Sales rank: 786,367
Product dimensions: 4.30(w) x 6.90(h) x 1.30(d)

About the Author

Janny Wurts is the author of the Cycle of Fire series, co-author of the worldwide bestselling Empire series with Raymond E. Feist, and is currently working through the Wars of Light and Shadow series. She often paints her own covers and is also an expert horsewoman, sailor, musician and archer.

Date of Birth:

December 10, 1953

Place of Birth:

Bryn Mawr, Lower Merion Township, Pennsylvania

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher

‘Astonishingly original and compelling… A gifted creator of wonder’RAYMOND E. FEIST‘It ought to be illegal for one person to have so much talent’STEPHEN DONALDSON‘A fascinating fantasy tale set in a delightful world’ Dreamwatch‘One to skive off work for’ Starburst‘Full of intriguing characters, dark magic, courage and mystery. Janny Wurts has created a masterpiece!’ Alien Online

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

To Ride Hell's Chasm 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 16 reviews.
dchaikin on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A fantasy book that introduces good characters early, but only slowly reveals itself. By the end it's all tied together, and quite wonderfully.For whatever reason, I'm obsessed with the structure of the book. The feel changes quite a bit as the book progresses. The first part comes across as really nicely written, but a bit slow. It gives the book a rich feel, with enjoyable character build up. But, it's tough going, something about the wording which I can't quite explain; in a way the words only indirectly describe what is actually happening.At some point, that same "rich" feel became instead more like a thick feel. The story slows, the description stays the same, and things seem to go slow-motion. Then it gently picked up again, but with a new and very different feel. The end is total rush of story and realization - and suddenly you appreciate everything. I found myself constantly rethinking things through.A better summary is this, from a post by LT user reading_fox: "I found the shape of the book to be something somewhat like riding a river over a waterfall - there is a long slow period where you are in a deep moving current, you then find this is too strong to get out of but not especially fast, then very rapidly you are swept into the maelstrom battered and ripped by currents and at the far of the plunge pool you emerge shaken and into placid waters once more."
jimmaclachlan on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Wow! Janny told me the story got really exciting during the last half. Wrong! It was really exciting all the way through. If there is any fault at all in the book, it is that the excitement NEVER slacks off & it's really hard to put down. That's not really fair when it is so long - yet seems not long enough. I'd love to read more about this world & its characters.The plot is beautifully crafted, lovingly revealed & the resolution left me gasping (& a bit teary eyed). The characters are amazingly human, yet heroic, each in their own way. The prose is a bit dense at times. Each word was obviously chosen with professional care, so be warned if you like to quickly skim a novel - don't do it. You might get away with it with this one, but you don't want to. The description is too acute, the world perfectly formed & a quick read will simply dim it.My highest praise is reserved for her handling of the horses. Obviously, she KNOWS horses. She knows their strengths, weaknesses & personalities. Yes, each horse has a personality. They're not simply hooved cars. They're not cutsey, caricatures, either. There is no anthropomorphism here. They're every bit as 'real' as the fictionalized humans. If you don't know horses, there may be a few terms that could use some definition, but not many. Most are well enough described. The 'near' side of a horse is the left side, for instance. It is a proper equestrian term.Anyway, it's a fantastic read & I highly recommend it. I've yet to be disappointed by one of her books & this one just raised my esteem for her writing another notch.
elbakerone on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
To Ride Hell's Chasm is an epic tale with many elements of classic fantasy - evil sorcerers, a strong sworded warrior, and a princess in peril. What would seem cliche however is woven into a fresh and exciting story under the expert pen of Janny Wurts. Her sorcerers wield demonic power instead of magic wands; the warrior is a foreigner mistrusted and suspected of evil; and the princess is a strong willed fighter and horsewoman. At first I was intimidated by the expanse of To Ride Hell's Chasm. However, Wurts artfully handles a magnificent world and paints a rich setting for readers. Her characters are complex and multi-faceted and while reading the book I got the sense of making new friends - at first I wasn't sure about some but as more dimensions of their personalities were revealed, they grew on me and I was almost sad to part with them at the end. One of the very unique features of this book was Wurts's use of horses - that sometimes stole the spotlight from their human companions. The descriptions were so well written that I could almost hear them galloping in my head. As noted in other reviews, some of the exposition in the beginning of the book slowed the pace slightly but for me, all the details served to solidify the characters in my mind. Especially on reflection, I think the characters were more realistic for having back stories and their early interactions revealed a lot of dimension to them. Also, once the action really took off it was a thrilling journey that concluded as brilliantly as it began.
readafew on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
To Ride Hell's Chasm is a stand-alone fantasy novel. Overall I enjoyed the story line and feel most of the timing was at a good pace. For me the biggest negative for the book were all the interactions and conversations taking place between Mykkael and most everyone else. I can only say that many of the reactions of people on both sides of conversations were not in any way how I would expect the comments to be taken. I can only assume that there was a level of subtlety beyond my understanding. Also many seem to be smart people who keep making the same mistakes that they should have already learned to avoid.I really enjoyed Wurts work with Feist and I plan on reading another one of her books in the future, but there were to many problems with character interactions that I couldn't accept, to truly make this a great book.
SunnySD on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A missing princess and a handful of strange deaths bring together two men, a mysterious foreigner and a rigidly focused captain of the royal guard. Caught in a vise of politics and diabolical plotting, the two men must decide whether to trust enough to stand together and face a nameless horror. Should either falter, more than a kingdom will fall.Wurts has outdone herself. Gut-wrenching and powerful, this stand-alone novel drags the reader along on a desperate plunge to outrace the minions of hell itself.
MrsLee on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This book was a real page turner. Set in a medieval type world, the combination of magic, evil and fantasy creatures was an interesting challenge for the heroes of the story. The characters unveil themselves slowly, growing on you as the story progresses. I enjoyed this story and found it satisfying. It was a library book, so I returned it. Though I did enjoy the read, it does not compel me to own it or read it again, though I would recommend it to others as a fine story.
evedeve on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Rollicking good fun -
Uffer on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The style this is written in doesn't quite come together into the deep, rich smoothly allusive tone that shows itself to such advantage throughout the Wars of Light & Shadow books; at times it can be a little grating - if I'd had to read once more about the strained edge of bar-q-whatsit reflex that keeps the good captain on the edge of berserk homicide for a great deal of the book, I really think I would have screamed. That said, it's pretty much the worst criticism I can level at the book, apart from just how sugar-and-spice the kingdom of Sessalie was supposed to be. On the other hand, the world-building is beautiful, building up by implication, rather than by long exposition of the 'as you know, the King, your father...' type.As other reviews have noted, there was a slow section in there where not a great deal was going on and we seemed to be mainly waiting for the demon's minions to make a move, and then it allhappensatonce in a mad scramble. But it's a great plot.Oh, and did I mention the world-building? I really enjoyed the world, even - or maybe especially - the bits we only get to see by implication. I particularly enjoyed the magic system, which has lots of different cultural specifics to it. This school uses geometric patterns, these folk use song, those over there use demons and human sacrifice... It's so much more multi-layered and human than saying, right, magic in this universe works this way, and there's nobody using any other method.I'd love to see something else in this universe, though I gather Hell's Chasm was specifically intended to be a one-shot. I guess I'm just too thoroughly seduced by that world-building...
reading_fox on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A small kingdom suddenly comes under attack from a sorcerous neighbour coverting the territory. The proncess escapes and starts to flee for her life. Only a dreadful passage across the mountains to a remaining ally can possably provide help. Fortunetly the captain of the guard remains to aid her progress, hardbitten and experianced he can meet any danger - but can she save him, at the last? Well written, but somehow fails to quite capture the right spirit in places. I'm not quite sure why this book didn't appeal to me more, the imagery is good and the plot inventive, with an intresting world, but somehow it doesn't quite fit.Updated - after reread.Maybe I'd had an off period, it was much better this time around. A really inventive magical system, easy to comprehend with exciting consequences. Demons live in a nether world, but can drive bargins from sorcerers who rapidly become enslaved. Their power can reach out across distance, but is counteracted by geometry and songs of the southern tribal shamens. (Quite where the traditional demons' counterpoint the gods fit in is unexplained). Mykkael - southern born but nothern raised is the garrison captain who's staunch skills and character aid the Princess on her desperate quest. Extremely well written, especially the love for the horses. Gripping - though slightly slow to get going as the confusion in the capitol is spun out.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Well after taking a break by reading another book, I finally finished the last 3rd of this book. And the last 3rd was pretty good and not boring, as I thought the first 2/3 of the book were. I'm moving the book up a bit in my rating scale to "maybe read again."
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
HowardLowinger More than 1 year ago
I've read several of Janny Wurt's novels now. She is a wonderful writer who portrays people such that you feel like you know them. This is what she did with Mykkael and Anya. They are sketched in and then filled out in To Ride Hell's Chasm in such clear detail that you'll feel like you've spent half your life with them. And the excitement never stops ... From the moment you meet the captain until the very end of the book. There is something happening throughout. I felt like I couldn't put the book down, and want to keep turning the pages until I got to the end. The book is long enough that you'll find yourself involved for a while; that is unless you read a lot faster than I do (:-). The paperback is 692 pages (but that's including a short reference section that is added at the end; nicely; I might add). But there is only one volume and unlike some of her other works (ala, the Cycle of Fire, trilogy, and the Wars of Light and Shadow ... which are also well worth spending time with) this appears to be a standalone novel. So even though it is longer, it isn't so long that you'd be afraid to start (and never finish). The only downside, if there is any, is that the world of Sessalie and Tuinvardia are so fascinating that I'm really hoping that Janny Wurts decides to write more (about them). I'd love to learn more about the other races and demons, that are referenced, in To Ride Hell's Chasm.
JimWoodWork More than 1 year ago
Wow! Janny told me the story got really exciting during the last half. Wrong! It was really exciting all the way through. If there is any fault at all in the book, it is that the excitement NEVER slacks off & it's really hard to put down. That's not really fair when it is so long - yet seems not long enough. I'd love to read more about this world & its characters. The plot is beautifully crafted, lovingly revealed & the resolution left me gasping (& a bit teary eyed). The characters are amazingly human, yet heroic, each in their own way. The prose is a bit dense at times. Each word was obviously chosen with professional care, so be warned if you like to quickly skim a novel - don't do it. You might get away with it with this one, but you don't want to. The description is too acute, the world perfectly formed & a quick read will simply dim it. My highest praise is reserved for her handling of the horses. Obviously, she KNOWS horses. She knows their strengths, weaknesses & personalities. Yes, each horse has a personality. They're not simply hooved cars. They're not cutsey, caricatures, either. There is no anthropomorphism here. They're every bit as 'real' as the fictionalized humans. If you don't know horses, there may be a few terms that could use some definition, but not many. Most are well enough described. The 'near' side of a horse is the left side, for instance. It is a proper equestrian term. Anyway, it's a fantastic read & I highly recommend it. I've yet to be disappointed by one of her books & this one just raised my esteem for her writing another notch.
Guest More than 1 year ago
In 'To Ride Hell's Chasm' Janny Wurts once again brings us a world alive with color and tradition, as well as truly believable characters. The simple, peaceful Kingdom of Sassalie is stunned when on the night of her betrothal the princess vanishes. Her recovery and safety fall to two men with vastly disparate backgrounds and methods. Both men will be tried through fire and sorcery and will face their weaknesses. A wonderful read and by far the best book I have read in a long time.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The small kingdom of Sessalie has known peace for centuries because the mountains that surround it keep enemies out. It is a happy place and the people are pleased that Princess Anja is marrying the crown Prince of Devall because that means the kingdom will have seaport access for the merchants. On the eve of Princess Anja¿s betrothal dinner, she doesn¿t show up and a search of the castle finds her gone........................................ The clothes she was to wear are found in a utility closet which means she left on her own free will. Nobody understands why she left since it is widely known she loves her prince but when Mykkael the captain of the Garrison, sees a witch ward outside the closet he begins to understand. Bound by oaths to keep her safe, he sets out after her. Before he leaves he instructs those in charge of the royal¿s safety how to stay warded against a sorcerer and his minions. When the captain and the princess join forces, they must find shamans willing to keep her safe and rid Sessalie of the abomination that wants to rule it..................................... This is a stand-alone epic fantasy that is full of action and adventure TO RIDE HELL¿S CHASM is a complex sword and sorcery novel whose protagonist is a man of honor, integrity and selflessness. He neither bends nor breaks despite the horrors he faces in his quest to save a kingdom and its princess. On her journey to save her homeland, the princess loses her innocence and becomes a warrior fighting the forces of darkness that want to kill her and aiding Mykkael when he needs help to fight the sorcerer¿s thralls.............................. Harriet Klausner