Time Travel: Tourism and the Rise of the Living History Museum in Mid-Twentieth-Century Canada

Time Travel: Tourism and the Rise of the Living History Museum in Mid-Twentieth-Century Canada

by Alan Gordon

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Overview

In the 1960s, Canadians could step through time to eighteenth-century trading posts or nineteenth-century pioneer towns. These living history museums promised authentic reconstructions of the past but, as Time Travel shows, they revealed more about mid-twentieth-century interests and perceptions of history than they reflected historical fact. These museums became important components of post-war government economic growth and employment policies. Shaped by political pressures and the need to balance education and entertainment, they reflected Canadians’ struggle to establish a pan-Canadian identity in the context of multiculturalism, competing nationalisms, First Nations resistance, and the growth of the state.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780774831543
Publisher: University of British Columbia Press
Publication date: 02/01/2017
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 372
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 8.70(h) x 1.00(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Alan Gordon is professor of history at the University of Guelph.

Table of Contents

Introduction: Living History Time Machines

Part 1: Foundations

1 History on Display

2 The Foundations of Living History in Canada

3 Tourism and History

Part 2: Structures

4 Pioneer Days

5 A Sense of the Past

6 Louisbourg and the Quest for Authenticity

Part 3: Connections

7 Fur and Gold

8 The Great Tradition of Western Empire

9 The Spirit of B & B

10 People and Place

11 Genuine Indians

Conclusion: The Limits of Time Travel

Notes

Index

What People are Saying About This

Paul Litt

Alan Gordon is a master of interpreting present-day uses of history. This study applies his synthesis of the latest scholarship on modern memory and tourism to a fascinating collection of case studies in which he pursues the elusive quarry of authenticity to reveal more genuine truths.

Francoise Noel

Time Travel may be about living history museums, but it is also about so much more. It adds to our knowledge of the mid-twentieth century and the way in which Canadians looked for a national identity, grappling – or not – with the presence of other cultures in the Canadian mosaic.

From the Publisher

"Time Travel may be about living history museums, but it is also about so much more. It adds to our knowledge of the mid-twentieth century and the way in which Canadians looked for a national identity, grappling – or not – with the presence of other cultures in the Canadian mosaic."—Francoise Noel, author of Family and Community Life in Northeastern Ontario: The Interwar Years

"In this groundbreaking book, Alan Gordon skilfully weaves together the work of leading thinkers in the fields of living history, tourism, historiography, museology, and heritage to advance our understanding of the development, and emerging theory, of living history museums."—Brian Osborne, professor emeritus of geography and planning at Queen's University

"Alan Gordon is a master of interpreting present-day uses of history. This study applies his synthesis of the latest scholarship on modern memory and tourism to a fascinating collection of case studies in which he pursues the elusive quarry of authenticity to reveal more genuine truths."— Paul Litt, professor in the public history program at Carleton University and author of Trudeaumania

Brian Osborne

In this groundbreaking book, Alan Gordon skilfully weaves together the work of leading thinkers in the fields of living history, tourism, historiography, museology, and heritage to advance our understanding of the development, and emerging theory, of living history museums.

Customer Reviews