Till Time's Last Sand: A History of the Bank of England 1694-2013

Till Time's Last Sand: A History of the Bank of England 1694-2013

by David Kynaston

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Overview

The authorised history of the Bank of England by the bestselling David Kynaston, 'the most entertaining historian alive' (Spectator).

'Not an ordinary bank, but a great engine of state,' Adam Smith declared of the Bank of England as long ago as 1776. The Bank is now over 320 years old, and throughout almost all that time it has been central to British history. Yet to most people, despite its increasingly high profile, its history is largely unknown.

Till Time's Last Sand by David Kynaston is the first authoritative and accessible single-volume history of the Bank of England, opening with the Bank's founding in 1694 in the midst of the English financial revolution and closing in 2013 with Mark Carney succeeding Mervyn King as Governor.

This is a history that fully addresses the important debates over the years about the Bank's purpose and modes of operation and that covers such aspects as monetary and exchange-rate policies and relations with government, the City and other central banks. Yet this is also a narrative that does full justice to the leading episodes and characters of the Bank, while taking care to evoke a real sense of the place itself, with its often distinctively domestic side.

Deploying an array of piquant and revealing material from the Bank's rich archives, Till Time's Last Sand is a multi-layered and insightful portrait of one of our most important national institutions, from one of our leading historians.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781408868584
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
Publication date: 09/07/2017
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 896
File size: 22 MB
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About the Author

David Kynaston was born in Aldershot in 1951. He has been a professional historian since 1973 and has written nineteen books, including The City of London, a widely acclaimed four-volume history, and WG's Birthday Party, an account of the Gentleman v. Players match at Lord's in July 1898. He is the author of Austerity Britain, 194551, Family Britain, 195157 and Modernity Britain, 1957-1959, the first three titles in a series of books covering the history of post-war Britain (194579) under the collective title 'Tales of a New Jerusalem'. He is currently a visiting professor at Kingston University.
David Kynaston was born in Aldershot in 1951. He has been a professional historian since 1973 and has written eighteen books, including The City of London (1994-2001), a widely acclaimed four-volume history, and WG's Birthday Party, an account of the Gentleman v. Players match at Lord's in July 1898. He is the author of Austerity Britain 1945-51 and Family Britain 1951-57, the first two titles in a series of books covering the history of post-war Britain (1945-1979) under the collective title 'Tales of a New Jerusalem'. He is currently a visiting professor at Kingston University.

Table of Contents

Preface xi

Prologue: It Must Now Necessarily be a Bank 1

Part 1 1694-1815

1 Services to the Nation 11

2 A Great Engine of State 33

3 A Steady and Unremitting Attention 59

4 An Elderly Lady in the City 77

Part 2 1815-1914

5 All the Obloquy 107

6 The Effects of Tight Lacing 143

7 Matters of Conduct and Behaviour 173

8 Money Will Not Manage Itself 201

9 Wonderfully Youthful in Spirit - Considering 233

Part 3 1914-46

10 The Kipling Man 277

11 Look Busy Anyway 327

12 The Dogs Bark 353

Part 4 1946-97

13 Not a Study Group 401

14 Honest Money 447

15 Entering from Stage Right 489

16 Sunny Offs 529

17 Serious Misgivings 569

18 Welcome and Long Overdue 635

Postscript: You just Don't Know When 729

Notes 797

Acknowledgements 850

Picture Credits 852

Index 856

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