They Call Me Carpenter

They Call Me Carpenter

by Upton Sinclair

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Overview

Upton Sinclair (1878 - 1968) wrote over 90 books in several genres. He was considered to be a leading social advocate. Because of his novel The Jungle, which dealt with conditions in the meat packing industry, The Pure Food and Drug Act and the Meat Inspection Act were passed. Sinclair's views on Christianity are clearly shown in They Call Me Carpenter. Written in 1922 the setting is post World War 1. They Call Me Carpenter is the story of the second coming. Christ returns to California and is again rejected. An excerpt reads, "In the doorway of the room appeared the little boy who had been knocked down by the car.  He looked at Carpenter, and then came towards him.  When Carpenter saw him, a smile of welcome came upon his face; he stretched out an arm, and the little fellow nestled in it.  Other children appeared in the doorway, and soon he had a group about him, sitting on his knees and on the couch.  They were little gutter-urchins, but he, seemingly, was interested in knowing their names and their relationships, what they learned in school, and what games they played.  I think he had Bertie's foot-ball crowd in mind, for he said:  "Some day they will teach you games of love and friendship, instead of rivalry and strife."

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9798679423312
Publisher: Independently published
Publication date: 09/18/2020
Pages: 186
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.40(d)

About the Author

Upton Beall Sinclair Jr. (1878 - 1968) was an American writer who wrote nearly 100 books and other works in several genres. Sinclair's work was well-known and popular in the first half of the twentieth century and he won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1943. In 1906, Sinclair acquired particular fame for his classic muckraking novel The Jungle, which exposed conditions in the U.S. meat packing industry, causing a public uproar that contributed in part to the passage a few months later of the 1906 Pure Food and Drug Act and the Meat Inspection Act. In 1919, he published The Brass Check, a muckraking exposé of American journalism that publicized the issue of yellow journalism and the limitations of the "free press" in the United States. Four years after publication of The Brass Check, the first code of ethics for journalists was created. Time magazine called him "a man with every gift except humor and silence". He is also well remembered for the line: "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it." He used this line in speeches and the book about his campaign for governor as a way to explain why the editors and publishers of the major newspapers in California would not treat seriously his proposals for old age pensions and other progressive reforms. Upton Sinclair was considered a force of nature -- being not only prolific in his novel-writing but a political force of decided influence. Unknown to many of his admirers, Sinclair also wrote adventure fiction, under the name Ensign Clark Fitch, U.S.N.

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