The Phantom of the Opera

The Phantom of the Opera

by Gaston Leroux

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Overview

The Phantom of the Opera (French: Le Fantôme de l'Opéra) is a novel by French writer Gaston Leroux. It was first published as a serialization in Le Gaulois from 23 September 1909, to 8 January 1910. It was published in volume form in late March 1910 by Pierre Lafitte.[1] The novel is partly inspired by historical events at the Paris Opera during the nineteenth century and an apocryphal tale concerning the use of a former ballet pupil's skeleton in Carl Maria von Weber's 1841 production of Der Freischütz. It has been successfully adapted into various stage and film adaptations, most notable of which are the 1925 film depiction featuring Lon Chaney.

In Paris in the 1890s, the Palais Garnier opera house is believed to be haunted by an entity known as the Phantom of the Opera, or simply the Opera Ghost. A stagehand named Joseph Buquet is found hanged and the rope around his neck goes missing. At a gala performance for the retirement of the opera house's two managers, a young little-known Swedish soprano, Christine Daaé, is called upon to sing in the place of the Opera's leading soprano, Carlotta, who is ill, and her performance is an astonishing success. The Vicomte Raoul de Chagny, who was present at the performance, recognises her as his childhood playmate, and recalls his love for her. He attempts to visit her backstage, where he hears a man complimenting her from inside her dressing room. He investigates the room once Christine leaves, only to find it empty. At Perros-Guirec, Christine meets with Raoul, who confronts her about the voice he heard in her room. Christine tells him she has been tutored by the Angel of Music, whom her father used to tell them about. When Raoul suggests that she might be the victim of a prank, she storms off. Christine visits her father's grave one night, where a mysterious figure appears and plays the violin for her. Raoul attempts to confront it but is attacked and knocked out in the process. Back at the Palais Garnier, the new managers receive a letter from the Phantom demanding that they allow Christine to perform the lead role of Marguerite in Faust, and that box 5 be left empty for his use, lest they perform in a house with a curse on it. The managers ignore his demands as a prank, resulting in disastrous consequences: Carlotta ends up croaking like a toad, and the chandelier suddenly drops into the audience, killing a spectator.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9789897783463
Publisher: Pandora's Box
Publication date: 05/13/2020
Sold by: De Marque
Format: NOOK Book
Sales rank: 9,503
File size: 305 KB

About the Author

Gaston Louis Alfred Leroux (6 May 1868[1] - 15 April 1927) was a French journalist and author of detective fiction.
In the English-speaking world, he is best known for writing the novel The Phantom of the Opera (Le Fantôme de l'Opéra, 1910), which has been made into several film and stage productions of the same name, notably the 1925 film starring Lon Chaney, and Andrew Lloyd Webber's 1986 musical. His novel The Mystery of the Yellow Room is one of the most celebrated locked-room mysteries.
Leroux was born in Paris in 1868 and died in 1927 in Nice. He went to school in Normandy and studied law in Paris, graduating in 1889. He inherited millions of francs and lived wildly until he nearly reached bankruptcy. In 1890, he began working as a court reporter and theater critic for L'Écho de Paris. His most important journalism came when he began working as an international correspondent for the Paris newspaper Le Matin. He was present at, and covered, the 1905 Russian Revolution.
Another case at which he was present involved the investigation and in-depth coverage of the former Paris Opera (presently housing the Paris Ballet).[1] The basement contained a cell that held prisoners of the Paris Commune.
He left journalism in 1907 and began writing fiction. In 1919, he and Arthur Bernède formed their own film company, Société des Cinéromans, publishing novels and turning them into films. He first wrote a mystery novel titled Le mystère de la chambre jaune (1908; English title: The Mystery of the Yellow Room), starring the amateur detective Joseph Rouletabille. Leroux's contribution to French detective fiction is considered a parallel to those of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in the United Kingdom and Edgar Allan Poe in the United States.
Leroux published his most famous work, The Phantom of the Opera, as a serial in 1909 and 1910, and as a book in 1910 (with an English translation appearing in 1911).
Leroux was made a Chevalier de la Legion d'honneur

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(Continues…)



Excerpted from "The Phantom of the Opera"
by .
Copyright © 2012 Gaston Leroux.
Excerpted by permission of Penguin Publishing Group.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Table of Contents

CONTENTS
PROLOGUE 3
CHAPTER I: IS IT THE GHOST? 5
CHAPTER II: THE NEW MARGARITA 9
CHAPTER III: THE MYSTERIOUS REASON 13
CHAPTER IV: BOX FIVE 16
CHAPTER V: THE ENCHANTED VIOLIN 22
CHAPTER VI: A VISIT TO BOX FIVE 28
CHAPTER VII: FAUST AND WHAT FOLLOWED 29
CHAPTER VIII: THE MYSTERIOUS BROUGHAM 36
CHAPTER IX: AT THE MASKED BALL 39
CHAPTER X: FORGET THE NAME OF THE MAN'S VOICE 43
CHAPTER XI: ABOVE THE TRAP-DOORS 46
CHAPTER XII: APOLLO'S LYRE 49
CHAPTER XIII: A MASTER-STROKE OF THE TRAP-DOOR LOVER 57
CHAPTER XIV: THE SINGULAR ATTITUDE OF A SAFETY-PIN 62
CHAPTER XV: CHRISTINE! CHRISTINE! 64
CHAPTER XVI: MME. GIRY'S ASTOUNDING REVELATIONS AS TO HER PERSONAL RELATIONS WITH THE OPERA GHOST 66
CHAPTER XVII: THE SAFETY-PIN AGAIN 71
CHAPTER XVIII: THE COMMISSARY, THE VISCOUNT AND THE PERSIAN 74
CHAPTER XIX: THE VISCOUNT AND THE PERSIAN 77
CHAPTER XX: IN THE CELLARS OF THE OPERA 80
CHAPTER XXI: INTERESTING AND INSTRUCTIVE VICISSITUDES OF A PERSIAN IN THE CELLARS OF THE OPERA 86
CHAPTER XXII: IN THE TORTURE CHAMBER 91
CHAPTER XXIII: THE TORTURES BEGIN 94
CHAPTER XXIV: "BARRELS! ... BARRELS! ... ANY BARRELS TO SELL?" 97
CHAPTER XXV: THE SCORPION OR THE GRASSHOPPER: WHICH? 101
CHAPTER XXVI: THE END OF THE GHOST'S LOVE STORY 104
EPILOGUE 108

Reading Group Guide

1. 1. Some modern critics feel the characters in The Phantom of the Opera are static and shallow, that Christine is too innocent, Raoul too noble, and Erik’s obsession with Christine never fully explained. Do you think Leroux purposely did this, and if so, why?

2. 2. The Phantom of the Opera was published as the romantic movement was slowly turning into the gothic movement. How would you classify it?

3. 3. Leroux wrote The Phantom of the Opera in a time when there was widespread French interest in Freudian psychoanalysis and particularly the libidinal/infantile/mother-seeking unconscious. How does Leroux work this into his novel? Are there characters that fit the infant or mother role?

4. 4. Some critics see the Phantom as simply the unconscious, the Freudian superego. Do you believe this is what Leroux was truly writing about, or did he give his monster more depth?

5. 5. Some see Erik as not shifting his class status, the theme of many gothic novels, but instead shifting his race. What scenes in the text help, or hinder, this assessment? Why would Leroux write of something so controversial?

6. 6. One of Leroux’s major themes in this novel is the changing of one’s class. Consider Christine, the daughter of a fairground fiddle player, now besting the most talented opera singer in Paris and winning the heart of a viscount. What is Leroux saying here? Is it meant to simply be a happy ending?

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