The Lost Ones (Quinn Colson Series #2)

The Lost Ones (Quinn Colson Series #2)

by Ace Atkins

Paperback

$14.63 $16.00 Save 9% Current price is $14.63, Original price is $16. You Save 9%.
View All Available Formats & Editions
Choose Expedited Shipping at checkout for guaranteed delivery by Tuesday, October 22

Overview

Fans of Justified and James Lee Burke will love Mississippi lawman Quinn Colson in this Edgar® Award Nominee for Best Novel from the author of The Ranger...

When Army Ranger Quinn Colson, the new sheriff of Tibbehah County, is called out to investigate a child abuse case, what he finds is a horrifying scene of neglect, thirteen empty cribs, and a shoe box full of money. Janet and Ramon Torres seem to have skipped town—but Colson’s sure they’ll come back for the cash.

Meanwhile, Colson’s sister has returned—clean and sober for good, she says. His friend Boom has been drinking himself into oblivion and picking fights at the local bar. And his old flame is pregnant. But Colson can’t focus on his personal problems. He and Deputy Lillie Virgil are convinced that Janet and Ramon have a taste for guns, drugs, and human trafficking. Soon Colson and Virgil find a link between the fugitive couple and a drug cartel that controls most of the Texas border, taking their investigation far beyond the rough hills of northeast Mississippi...

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780425258644
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 12/04/2012
Series: Quinn Colson Series , #2
Pages: 368
Sales rank: 113,377
Product dimensions: 5.40(w) x 8.20(h) x 1.00(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Ace Atkins is the New York Times bestselling author of the Quinn Colson novels, the first two of which—The Ranger and The Lost Ones—were nominated for the Edgar Award for Best Novel (he also has a third Edgar nomination for his short story, “Last Fair Deal Gone Down”). In addition, he is the author of several New York Times bestselling novels in the continuation of Robert B. Parker’s Spenser series. Before turning to fiction, he was a correspondent for the St. Petersburg Times, a crime reporter for the Tampa Tribune, and, in college, played defensive end for the undefeated Auburn University football team (for which he was featured on the cover of Sports Illustrated). He lives in Oxford, Mississippi.

Read an Excerpt

1

 

A couple roustabouts had been asking about guns at the Tibbehah County Fair, but by the time the word had gotten back to Donnie Varner, they'd long since packed up their Ferris wheel, corn dog stands and shit, and boogied on down the highway. He'd tried for them at a rodeo up in Eupora and the fall festival over in Hernando, but it wasn't until he pulled off the highway into a roadside carnival in Byhalia, Mississippi, that he knew he had the right spot. It was late, past nine o'clock, and the edge of Highway 78 was lit up in red, blue, and yellow neon, the fairway spreading out past the gas station and into an open cow field, bursting with folks carrying popcorn and balloons, little black kids and white kids, Mexicans working the stands. The air smelled like burnt sugar and cigarettes.

 

"¿D—nde está Alejandro Ram’rez Umana?"

 

A fat brown woman running a stick around a cotton candy dryer nodded to the flashing lights of a Tilt-A-Whirl called the Cool Breeze. As Donnie walked closer, he could see the little cars spinning and zipping up into a fake ice tunnel where folks would scream when getting blasted with cold air and mist. Donnie's white T-shirt was already soaked through from his ride up from Jericho with no air conditioner in a busted-up Dodge van he'd borrowed from his church.

 

How the hell else could he have brought a sampling of the fifteen AK-47s, two Mossberg 12-gauge shotguns, three MAK-90 assault rifles, a Ruger Mini-14, and a .223 caliber AR variant rifle? There was a mixed bag of ammunition, scopes, magazines, and gun cases to show that he meant business and could deliver more.

 

A dark girl with long legs was taking tickets, black hair pulled back from her face with a pink scarf, wearing a white tank top and shorts, a fat pink belt around her small waist. She was tall and thin, with muscular brown thighs. She wore a pair of old cowboy boots.

 

Donnie smiled at her and repeated: "¿D—nde está Alejandro Ram’rez Umana?"

 

"I speak English."

 

"Where's he at?"

 

"Who are you?"

 

"A friend."

 

"I don't know you."

 

A couple kids muscled by Donnie and handed the girl tickets. Both boys looked at the Mexican woman in the damp white tank top and smiled at each other. Their heads swiveled as they made their way up the ramp, nearly tripping over themselves into the Cool Breeze tunnel.

 

"I heard he needed some guns," Donnie said.

 

"That's not true."

 

"Fine by me."

 

"Don't talk so loud."

 

"I'll be getting a hot dog over at that stand."

 

"What is your name?"

 

"Donnie Varner."

 

"Alejandro knows you?"

 

"Just tell him about the guns."

 

Donnie pulled out a pack of Natural American Spirit cigarettes and thumped them forward, ripping open the box. He fired one up and strolled over to a clump of vendors selling Polish sausages, pizza, barbecue, and Coney Island dogs. He paid two dollars for a footlong and dressed it with mustard and relish, wishing he had a cold Busch beer to wash it down.

 

The best thing about going to Trashcanistan and coming back was enjoying every goddamn moment you got. In the good hours, the pleasures seemed more intense. He could smoke cigarettes on his dad's porch all night long, watch the sun rise off the hay his father had rolled and baled. During the bad hours-maybe why he didn't like to sleep-he'd think he was still over there, hearing that market bomb explode near three of his buddies, with parts of forty civilians getting shredded with them. How do you make sense of that?

 

He'd had three surgeries to remove all the shrapnel that had decorated his back. But the first words out of his father's mouth on a cell phone call from back home was: "Y'all get the bastard?" He had to tell his dad, No. This wasn't Vietnam. These people really didn't have no objective besides blowing themselves to heaven and screwing seventy-two black-eyed virgins.

 

You could smell the turn of the season mixed in the corn dogs and funnel cakes. Mississippi still had hot days, but there was a gentleness to those hot breezes, signaling fall was coming on, chillier weather. Cotton gins were running. People were turning over their crops and planting collards and harvesting pumpkins.

 

Donnie wiped the mustard off his chin and stood and stretched, scratching his chest and lighting up another Spirit. Down the midway in all that neon glow, he spotted that fine Mexican woman, hands in tight pockets of those white shorts, wiggling down the worn path. Cowboy boots kicking up a bit of dust till she got near him and didn't smile but just pointed.

 

"And?"

 

"Go to the motel."

 

"Where?"

 

She pointed again to a little, squat two-level facing a cow pasture and Highway 78.

 

"Oh, there."

 

"Room 211."

 

"Do I look that goddamn stupid?"

 

"I'll wait with you."

 

"I don't know you."

 

"Or you, us," she said. "If you have a wire-"

 

"I ain't wearin' no wire."

 

"But if you are-"

 

"Alejandro will chimichanga my ass."

 

She raised her thick eyebrows and nodded, walking ahead of him, making Donnie sweat by the way she walked. He was enjoying the white shorts and cowboy boots, but he wasn't altogether stupid, reaching up under his T-shirt and making sure the .38 Special was tucked in his branded belt.

 

She had a key and opened the door on the second floor. Donnie hung back, waiting to hear something, blowing out a thin trail of smoke and staring down at the neon carnival facing the cotton fields, cars headed north to Memphis.

 

"Come on."

 

"I'm good."

 

"Come on," the girl said.

 

Donnie shrugged and wandered in, keeping cool, looking to other doors and then back the way he came. He walked back to the bathroom, heart jackhammering in his chest, checking behind the shower curtain and then strolling out nice and easy. He found the girl facing him, arms across her nice chest, but frowning. "Take off your shirt."

 

"Come on now, sweet thing."

 

"Luz." She had a slight bead of perspiration on her upper lip and rings of sweat under her arms.

 

"What kind of Mex name is that?"

 

"An old one."

 

He peeled off his T-shirt, fronting the girl so she couldn't get a glimpse of his pistol.

 

"And your blue jeans."

 

"Hell."

 

Donnie shook his head, took the lit cigarette out of his mouth, and placed it in an ashtray by the bedside. He reached behind him slow, grinning, and showed her the gun loose in his right hand. "OK?"

 

She nodded.

 

"Be a lot easier if you'd show me, too."

 

"You came to us."

 

"A fella can at least try."

 

She waited till he'd taken his jeans down to his cowboy boots and made a slow turn in his boxer shorts. Her face dropped when he looked at her, and he knew she'd seen the thick, rubbery scars on his back. He pulled his pants up and reached back for his .38, sliding it into his belt, and then slipped into his T-shirt.

 

She dialed a number on her cell and sat down on the sagging bed, the cheap bedspread stained and sun-faded. She didn't say anything. She lolled her head in a shrug and crossed her legs, swinging her booted foot back and forth.

 

Donnie walked back to the front door and waited on the balcony, leaning over the railing while he smoked two more cigarettes. He'd heard about these bad dudes down in Biloxi from this fella in Jericho named Ram—n, gangbangers from Mexico and out west that blew in after Katrina and decided to stick around and do business, run whatever they could back and forth to Old Mexico. He didn't know nothing about their politics or business, only that they paid in cash.

 

A Mexican man turned the corner from the stairwell and nodded at him.

 

Alejandro Ram’rez Umana's entire face had been scrawled in jailhouse tattoos. He was short and muscular, with a shaved head and small mustache. The black scrollwork on his face showed numbers and letters and drawings of demon horns.

 

Alejandro said something fast and harsh in Spanish. Donnie caught about none of it, watching while he pointed out to the wide parking lot, already starting to empty out for the night. She nodded. "He wants you to bring them here. To the motel."

 

"Two miles down the road is a Walmart," Donnie said. "Y'all can meet me in the parking lot for a little look-see. I got a brown Dodge van. Just you and him."

 

She told him. He answered her, seeming like he was pissed off, keeping an eye on Donnie. Donnie Varner smiled and winked. Alejandro stared at Donnie, seeming kind of like he was an insect, before turning and bounding down the metal steps.

 

"He will want to shoot the guns."

 

"That can be arranged."

 

"First we see the guns. How many can you get?"

 

"How many y'all need?" Donnie grinned at Luz. The smile seemed to make her nervous.

 

"Many."

 

"Baby, you're too pretty to be at this freak show."

 

She finally smiled. He handed her a business card.

 

"See y'all in Tibbehah County."

 

2

 

Quinn Colson did not want or need to attend the annual Good Ole Boy party out at Johnny Stagg's property. But Chief Deputy Lillie Virgil had pointed out it was an unwritten requirement of being sheriff in Tibbehah County, even if Quinn had only been sheriff since a special election in the spring and that election had been against Stagg. And now it was fall. Stagg's behemoth metal barn where he kept tractors and earthmovers had been cleaned out and filled with long tables covered in red-and-white-checked oilcloth and folding chairs borrowed from the three Baptist churches in Jericho. A well-known master of barbecue had brought in his crew from Sugar Ditch, and dozens of steel washtubs had been filled with ice and cans of cheap beer and Coca-Cola. A bonfire blazed at the edge of Stagg's land, where politicians from all over north Mississippi gathered despite the lack of chill in the air.

 

"Johnny Stagg may be this county's biggest asshole," Lillie Virgil said, slamming the door to Quinn's old Ford truck, "but he sure knows how to throw a party."

 

"How long do I have to stay?"

 

"Do I need to remind you that sheriff is an elected position?"

 

"Do you recall Stagg telling everyone that I suffered from post-traumatic stress and was a loose cannon?"

 

"He would've said worse about me."

 

Quinn shut the driver's door and followed Lillie down a gravel road where conversion trucks were parked alongside Cadillacs and Mercedeses. Men had driven north from Jackson or south from Memphis to check out this year's political climate, whether it was for U.S. Senate or the coroner of Choctaw County. There would be stump speeches and political alliances made. After the speeches came the long prayer, and then the meal where hundreds, maybe a thousand, would listen to a country band down from Tupelo fronted by Kay Bain, a spitfire in her seventies who didn't stand much taller than five feet and who could wail as good as Tammy Wynette.

 

"I used to come out here with my uncle," Quinn said.

 

"See," Lillie said. "He hated Stagg back then, too. But he knew it was part of the job."

 

"I'd like to punch Johnny Stagg in the throat."

 

"Are all you Rangers so damn charming?" Lillie asked.

 

Quinn stood tall and rangy, hair buzzed high and tight, wearing a pressed khaki shirt with two front pockets, pressed blue jeans, and shined boots. He kept a Beretta 9mm on his hip, the same one that had served him on numerous missions in Iraq and Afghanistan as a Ranger in the 3rd Batt, 75th Regiment. A patch of the sheriff's office star was sewn on his left pocket.

 

His face was all sharp angles, a hint of Cherokee from some time back. He looked to be a hard man even though he'd yet to turn thirty.

 

"If I were you," Lillie said, "I'd walk right up to Johnny Stagg and shake his hand."

 

"Smile as you walk through the cannon smoke and give 'em hell?"

 

"Stagg would hate it if you showed you were a bigger man."

 

Quinn regarded Lillie as they met the edge of Stagg's land. He looked at her brown curly hair pulled into a ponytail and freckled face without a trace of makeup. She was nearly his height and a hell of a looker when not wearing an oversized sheriff's office jacket and laced clunky boots.

 

But if he ever complimented her, she took it as an insult.

 

Quinn said hello to several folks who'd supported him in the election against Stagg, the boldest supporter being old Betty Jo Mize who ran the Tibbehah Monitor. With wry humor, she'd described Johnny Stagg's entire sordid history in her columns-his strip club truck stop and association with criminals. Quinn was pretty sure that's what won him the election.

 

He hugged the old woman and she winked at him, whispering into his ear. "Glad you're here. That prick will hate it."

 

"Where's the beer?"

 

Betty Jo smiled and pointed the way.

 

Quinn found a cold Budweiser and met up with Mr. Jim, a veteran of Patton's 3rd Army who ran the town barbershop, and Luther Varner, a Marine sniper who'd served in Vietnam. Mr. Jim was talking about shutting down the barbershop again, a rumor he'd been spreading since Quinn was a kid. Luther Varner just smiled as Mr. Jim talked, smoking down a long Marlboro red. He had a faded Semper Fi tattoo on his wrinkled forearm and a face fashioned from granite.

 

"God damn," Varner said. "How long are these folks gonna talk? I'm getting hungry."

 

"They hold the meal just so we have to listen," Mr. Jim said.

 

"Are you listening to this horseshit?" Varner asked.

 

A nervous young guy in a tieless suit stood on the small stage filled with guitars and a drum set. He spoke about his love of country and his personal relationship with Jesus Christ. "I am a family man and an avid hunter. No one will take that away from me."

 

Quinn drank his beer.

 

"This is more than an election to me," the candidate said. "It's a crusade. We will restore morals to our country and put God in charge."

 

The speeches were limited to two minutes, sometimes Stagg having to get on stage and point to his golden watch. The Good Ole Boy was good-natured, the candidates black and white, male and female. A black woman was running for circuit judge and offered the only speech that contained facts about her office. There were coroners and county clerks, two U.S. Congress candidates trading veiled barbs about mean-spirited television ads Quinn had not seen.

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher

“One of the best crime writers at work today.”—Michael Connelly

“A series that should push him to the top of the bestseller list.”—John Sandford
“Keep an eye on Ace Atkins, he can write rings around most of the names in the crime field.”—Elmore Leonard

“[His] estimable range may bring to mind Lee Child’s hardfisted, softhearted Jack Reacher, which is entirely a good thing.”—Kirkus Reviews

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

The Lost Ones 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 30 reviews.
Twink More than 1 year ago
I first 'discovered' Ace Atkins with last year's release of The Ranger - the first book featuring Quinn Colson. I loved it and have been eagerly awaiting the next in this series. The Lost Ones is newly released and is just as good (or better) as the first one! After ten years as an Army Ranger, Quinn Colson returned to his home town of Jericho in Tibbehah County, Mississippi. He's now the new sheriff in town. When a local doctor calls him about a child brought in with a head injury, Quinn and his chief deputy Lillie Virgil head out to investigate. What they find is an empty, filthy house. It looks like the residents were running a puppy mill...and a baby trafficking outfit. Donnie Varner, an old friend of Quinn, is doing his own trafficking as well - in guns. As Quinn and Lillie investigate, it looks like the two cases might have something - or someone - in common. Atkins draws his characters so well. I have a firm picture in my mind of Quinn - a tough, loyal, cagey lawman who knows his county well. And umm, did I mention he's kind of (okay a lot) sexy too. Kind of that holdin' out for a hero vibe. Lillie is firmly planted in my mind as well - she's a female version of Quinn, although we see some vulnerability this time round. We also get to know some of Quinn's back story with flashbacks to his younger days with his sister Caddy. The supporting cast is equally well drawn, with one-armed Boom standing out for me. In fact I found myself rooting for one of the 'bad guys', hoping he would get a break. The dialogue really fleshs out the mental pictures I've created. A lot of it is short and snappy, and quite humourous at times. Anything more involved would detract from the atmosphere Atkins has created. The setting is just as much of a character. Stark and gritty, Atkins brings to life a county beset by poverty, abuse and corruption. The plotting is excellent, zigging just when I thought it would zag. Lots and lots of action, kept me frantically turning pages until I finished the book far too quickly. So pull up a rocker, grab a glass of sweet tea, put your feet up on the railing and be prepared to set a spell. It's a hell of a read - one you won't want to put down. Fans of television's Justified and Raylan Givens would enjoy this character, as would Jack Reacher fans.
Man_Of_La_Book_Dot_Com More than 1 year ago
The Lost Ones by Ace Atkins is a novel tak­ing place in the fic­tional Tibbe­hah County, Mis­sis­sippi. This is the sec­ond bookin “The Ranger” series, which was also the name of the first book. Quinn Colo­son resigned from the Army Rangers to become Sher­iff of Tibbe­hah County, Mis­sis­sippi, his uncle’s old job. A Mex­i­can car­tel is seemed to be get­ting guns from a gun store his friend owns and at the same time an abused child case sends the sher­iff and his deputy to dis­cover a child boot­leg ring. The Lost Ones by Ace Atkins returns famil­iar and new char­ac­ters in the series. Quinn Col­son, a for­mer Army Ranger, his fam­ily, friends and neme­sis. Ace Atkins, in my opin­ion, is one of the best and active Amer­i­cana writ­ers. I have read sev­eral of his his­tor­i­cal fic­tion books (many set in the 1920s) and enjoyed them tremen­dously. Mr. Atkins’ foray into fic­tion proved to me that he is a capa­ble writer and is here for the long haul. The author has an uncanny abil­ity to paint a pic­ture with few words. It’s amaz­ing that he describes a scene or a per­son with just the right amount of ver­biage let­ting the reader do most of the work accord­ing to their understanding. Atkins draws county where “new in town” means you’ve been there for only ten years, Sonic is the go to place to get a meal and you still think of girls you knew with their maiden name attached. There is a lot going on in this book, Mex­i­can drug gangs, child abuse, baby rack­e­teer­ing, fam­ily drama and small town cor­rup­tion yet the book moves along slowly, well paced let­ting the reader take in the mul­ti­ple sto­ry­lines as if strolling in the park on a lazy sum­mer day. The char­ac­ter of Quinn Col­son is bound to become a phe­nom­ena in pop-culture much like Jack Reacher or Cot­ton Mal­one. I can see a fan based built around this char­ac­ter who is a peace­ful war­rior who has many issues most of us have. Mex­i­can drug gangs are just as big an issue as a dis­turbed sis­ter or an Army buddy who needs a job. That is how life is, there are no small prob­lems – it’s all personal. While I never vis­ited the Deep South, this novel was still a plea­sure to read. Mr. Atkins has a way of por­tray­ing his char­ac­ters in a believ­able, mov­ing man­ner. The sto­ries take on a life of their own with the excel­lent dia­log and char­ac­ters’ moti­va­tions while the sus­pense and implied vio­lence kept me at the edge of my seat.
kathleen.heady on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The principal characters in The Lost Ones are soldiers returning from Iraq and Afghanistan to rural Mississippi, soldiers who have not yet learned to put their guns down. One of them, Sheriff Quinn Colson, has become the chief law enforcement officer of Tebbehah County. Another, Donnie Varner, runs a gun shop and shooting range, and is not averse to making a sale to buyers on the wrong side of the law, a dangerous business, especially when he becomes involved with members of a Mexican drug cartel.At the same time, Quinn and his deputy, Lillie Virgil, are on the trail of another group of unsavory characters who are in the business of selling Mexican babies. Their crimes become even more serious when one of the babies dies, and the couple last seen with the child have disappeared along with several other children. They have left a filthy trailer, clear evidence of the treatment the children received, as well as abused dogs penned outside in even worse filth. The sheriff seems to just miss this notorious group every time they reach a new hideout. The characters in The Lost Ones are as real as your next door neighbors. They live in an economically depressed region of the South, where poverty and political corruption are a way of life. But a novel populated with as many unsavory characters as this one only becomes a great novel when it is clear that even the best characters have their weaknesses, and the worst just may have a ¿good¿ quality or two.Author Ace Atkins takes the reader through many twists and turns as the plot barrels to its dramatic conclusion. The Lost Ones will keep you up until the last page is turned, and leave you satisfied and waiting for the next novel in the Quinn Colson series.
groundedforlife on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is the second in a series and not having read the first book introducing us to the character of Quinn Colson I thought I was hoping that this book would stand on it's own and I wouldn't feel left out not knowing what was going on with the characters. It did and I now want to go back and read the first book just to enjoy another story by Ace Atkins.I really enjoy books that are based in the South with a couple of my favorite Authors being Greg Iles and Karin Slaughter and was hoping that I would enjoy the book but never thought it would live up to the expectations of Iles and Slaughter. It did and it caught me off guard. I read through this very captivating book in just two days. Interesting characters that grabbed my attention from the start and held my interest all the way to the exciting finish. Characters both good and bad that you find yourself wanting things to somehow work out for them. And the setting of the book if your familiar with the Delta section of the South was as richly written about as well almost becoming a pivotal character in the story itself.I look forward to more in this series from Ace Atkins.
SandyLee on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Quinn Colson is a former Army Ranger and now sheriff in a small town in Mississippi. His father has been gone for years, off in Hollywood somewhere while his mother lost herself in a bottle. His sister has a young son she barely sees because she¿s always off in search of herself. Donny Varner is a friend from Quinn¿s high school days, always in trouble and always looking for a way to make a quick buck. Dealing in weapons and supplying a Mexican drug cartel seems like easy money to him. But he¿s in way over his head as he deals with crooked politicians and the girlfriend of one of the Mexican drug runners. Whereas most books I am drawn to are more intense, THE LOST ONES is a lazy ride down the Mississippi or a slow swing on a front porch. I had to stop midway and pick up a Nelson DeMille book just to make sure my heart was still pumping. After finishing that book in a quick two days, I returned to THE LOST ONES. Quinn is soft hearted. He tries to help another friend, Boomer, by offering him a job fixing the county vehicles. Boomer gets drunk and destructive most nights as a way to try to forget his army days and how he lost an arm. Quinn has a lot of family angst with back story about how he and his sister tried to run away from home, how his high school sweetheart got tired of waiting for him to return from the Army and married another guy. She is now pregnant but the attraction is still there. And then an FBI agent following the gun smuggling case gets close and personal with Quinn. Fans of the TV show, JUSTIFIED, will see an uncanny similarity in the characters and theme.
Boobalack on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
After I read the first book in this series, The Ranger, I had hoped this one would be as good. It did not disappoint. Quinn Colson is back in his hometown of Jerico, Mississippi, and is now the sheriff, after having left the US Army as a Ranger.Still on hand are his tomboy deputy, Lillie; his friend, Boom, who lost an arm in the service; his sister, Caddy, who has a habit of leaving her son with her mother and leaving for long periods of time; and Donnie Varner, along with several more of his friends and acquaintances. Added to the mix this go `round is an FBI Agent, Dinah, and a number of unsavory characters.It seems that Quinn and Lillie care a little more for each other than either one of them is willing to admit. Lillie becomes jealous of Dinah, when Dinah makes a play for Quinn. Quinn¿s highschool sweetheart is now married to a doctor and is pregnant. She and Quinn still have feelings for each other, though they try to hide it. Her husband treats an abused child and informs Quinn. An investigation leads to a child trafficking operation. Once again, the author¿s descriptive ability is excellent.In another plot line, Donnie, the owner of a legal gun range and gun sales establishment becomes involved in illegal gun running. He falls in love with a Mexican woman, Luz, and she protects him from the head honcho in the cartel. Through a twist of fate, Donnie sees the people who are selling children and reports them. This book is very well written and has a plot twist that you¿d never suspect. Very interesting. I hope there¿s another ¿Quinn Colson¿ book, as I want him and Lillie to realize that they love each other.
tomray on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Definitely another winner.I read the first Quinn Colson and was lucky enough to get this as a early reviewer. Ace is also the new Spencer taking Robert Parkers place because of his untimely death.I read his first Spencer and it was also very good.I plan to read some of his older books as I travel the country this summer.I'm looking foward to the next Quinn Colson book.
jsharpmd on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Ex US Army Ranger Quinn Colson returns home from the Afgan war to be elected as the new Sheriff of Tibbeha Co winning the election over politician/ex sheriff Johnny Stagg. The setting is in the town of Jericho, Mississippi. Quinn's childhood friend Donnie Varner is selling guns (legally and otherwise) to a Mexican Cartel.Quinn's sister Caddy has returned once again to Jericho to be with her Mother and son Jason. She is a recovering alcoholic and drug addict.This is an exciting story which makes it difficult to lay it aside to get things done. Lots of action along with the emotional content of a family with a difficult history.
Twink on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I first 'discovered' Ace Atkins with last year's release of The Ranger - the first book featuring Quinn Colson. I loved it and have been eagerly awaiting the next in this series. The Lost Ones is newly released and is just as good (or better) as the first one! After ten years as an Army Ranger, Quinn Colson returned to his home town of Jericho in Tibbehah County, Mississippi. He's now the new sheriff in town. When a local doctor calls him about a child brought in with a head injury, Quinn and his chief deputy Lillie Virgil head out to investigate. What they find is an empty, filthy house. It looks like the residents were running a puppy mill...and a baby trafficking outfit. Donnie Varner, an old friend of Quinn, is doing his own trafficking as well - in guns. As Quinn and Lillie investigate, it looks like the two cases might have something - or someone - in common. Atkins draws his characters so well. I have a firm picture in my mind of Quinn - a tough, loyal, cagey lawman who knows his county well. And umm, did I mention he's kind of (okay a lot) sexy too. Kind of that holdin' out for a hero vibe. Lillie is firmly planted in my mind as well - she's a female version of Quinn, although we see some vulnerability this time round. We also get to know some of Quinn's back story with flashbacks to his younger days with his sister Caddy. The supporting cast is equally well drawn, with one-armed Boom standing out for me. In fact I found myself rooting for one of the 'bad guys', hoping he would get a break. The dialogue really fleshs out the mental pictures I've created. A lot of it is short and snappy, and quite humourous at times. Anything more involved would detract from the atmosphere Atkins has created. The setting is just as much of a character. Stark and gritty, Atkins brings to life a county beset by poverty, abuse and corruption. The plotting is excellent, zigging just when I thought it would zag. Lots and lots of action, kept me frantically turning pages until I finished the book far too quickly. So pull up a rocker, grab a glass of sweet tea, put your feet up on the railing and be prepared to set a spell. It's a hell of a read - one you won't want to put down. Fans of television's Justified and Raylan Givens would enjoy this character, as would Jack Reacher fans.
tymfos on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I received an Advance Reader's Copy of uncorrected proofs through the LT Early Reviewers program, and this review is based on that copy.Quinn Colson comes home from service as an Army Ranger, and winds up elected to his late uncle's old office, as Sheriff of Tebbehah County, Mississippi. Several of his friends are ex-military, too, and suffered damage of various kinds in the war. Then there's his family: a recovering alcoholic mother who still mourns over Elvis Presley's death; and his sister Caddie the Prodigal Daughter, welcomed back by Mom, who has found religion and is intent on pushing it onto her brother. (I can't quote from this copy because it's uncorrected proofs, but there was one exchange between brother and sister I wish I could quote, because it is priceless.)Quinn is dealing with a case of serious child and animal abuse, gun runners, and federal agents, while coming to terms with incidents from his and Caddie's childhood. In the process, there are lots of shots fired, figurative and literal.This book is second in a series. There were references to the previous book (and some were likely spoilers) but the book was easy to follow without having read the first book.I had some style issues with the book, POV issues. It was written in third person, but the author would still often write for a spell rather like he was in the character's head (not always Standard English, ya know) and then throw in a line that was clearly not reflecting the POV character's attitude at all, IMO. I don't know. It was a good enough story, but it felt choppy at times. There were some sections that were in the past, and I didn't feel that the transition to those sections was effective at times.It was a decent read, but it didn't really grab my attention and hold me until a little too close to the end. It took a long time for me to warm up to any of the characters, but I eventually did. I think my luke-warm reception may have simply been a matter of taste.
cdhtenn2k10 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is the second in a series featuring Quinn Colson, a former Army Ranger and now small town sheriff. There is a lot to like in this book. The characterization is excellent, the dialog is natural and witty, and the action is cleanly portrayed. Atkins does a very nice job of capturing the south, especially a part of the deep south with its particular set of problems, such as poverty, drugs, and the criminal aftermath that disasters like Katrina create.Atkins keeps the novel moving at an engaging pace, even when focussing on the bad guys. Sometimes novels slow down when the focus shifts away from the main characters, but this isn't the case here. The bad guys are every bit as interesting and engaging as the main characters.Also, Atkins isn't afraid to change the dynamics of the main characters. We see real growth and change, and learn about the main character's history which adds nicely to the development of both Quinn Colson and his sister, Caddy.Atkins has created an interesting new series and populated it with interesting, living characters. His writing is tight, and compels the reader to the very end.
tjm568 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I should start by saying that I had never read Ace Atkins when I requested this book from Early readers. I also didn't realize it was the second book in a series. So to better follow the story, I went and picked up"Ranger" the previous book in this series and read that first."The Lost Ones" was a well written, exciting story. It opens with Quinn Colson, the hero we first meet in "Ranger", back in Tibbehah County as the recently elected sherrif. He doesn't really know how to do the job and relies on his deputy to fill in the finer points of law and procedure. There is also some sexual tension between the two. The story is primarily aboutgun running and human trafficking and is written in the same spare style as "Ranger". I found it somewhat similar to the Craig Johnson books, which is high praise from me. Fans of the crime thriller genre will enjoy this series. I was particularly happy to be introduced to an unknown author who already has a body of work out there. I have already picked up another of his books.
CKGS on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Quinn Colson, former Army Ranger back from Afghanistan, and newly elected sheriff on Tibbehah County, doesn¿t waste any time going up against a Mexican cartel running guns, a corrupt city father, Johnny Stagg, and an illegal adoption ring.Colson, young in years, nevertheless, is able to run a nine man department with many county miles to cover, while succeeding the previous sheriff who just happened to be Colson¿s uncle. Colson, now living at his uncle¿s old farmhouse with the dog Hondo, returns to his family and friends to start a new chapter in his life.Lillie Virgil, the only holdover from the previous regime of slackers and crooked deputies, steers him through the murky waters of county politics while watching his back as the chief deputy for Tibbehah County.When the doctor husband of Colson¿s previous girlfriend stops by to give him a heads up on Janet Torres, a former daycare provider, who brought in a 3 year old child with too injuries to attribute from falling out of a shopping cart, Colson investigates. The farmhouse is deserted with thirteen empty cribs and many cages of sick and dying dogs. Torres, on the run, was operating a puppy mill and supposedly a daycare out of her home. At the same time, the ATF sends a representative to meet with Colson investigating Donnie Varner, discharged and also back from Afghanistan. Varner brought back guns he liberated from the U. S. Army hoping to sell to a Mexican cartel. Soon the two cases merge when Colson finds out Torres¿s boyfriend has ties to the cartel. Second in the Quinn Colson series, we see plenty of action and eagerly wait for the next book featuring the former Army Ranger, now sheriff in the wilds of Tibbehah country, Mississippi.
maureen61 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A thoroughly enjoyable story of the deep south,Mexican drug cartels, a hometown sheriff and the continuing fallout from America's wars. Very well written storyline with credible dialogue, plot twists and unexpected outcomes. I will now go and find the author's other novels!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Good.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Good read.
akrosie More than 1 year ago
I totally wasted my money on this book. The plot was good but the language and innuendo's were over the top. I read halfway through the book and put it down. Such a disappointment!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I had to put this book down after about 75 pages. I really had no attachment to any of the characters and the plot moved too slowly--probably gave it more time than it deserved.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great small town Southern setting and characters - a good read!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago