I Ching: The Book of Changes

I Ching: The Book of Changes

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Overview

The I Ching, The Book of Changes, is an ancient Chinese divination text and the oldest of the Chinese classics. Possessing a history of more than two and a half millennia of commentary and interpretation, the I Ching is an influential text read throughout the world, providing inspiration to the worlds of religion, psychoanalysis, business, literature, and art. Originally a divination manual in the Western Zhou period (1000-750 BC), over the course of the Warring States period and early imperial period (500-200 BC) it was transformed into a cosmological text with a series of philosophical commentaries known as the "Ten Wings." After becoming part of the Five Classics in the 2nd century BC, the I Ching was the subject of scholarly commentary and the basis for divination practice for centuries across the Far East, and eventually took on an influential role in Western understanding of Eastern thought.

The I Ching uses a type of divination called cleromancy, which produces apparently random numbers. Six numbers between 6 and 9 are turned into a hexagram, which can then be looked up in the I Ching book, arranged in an order known as the King Wen sequence. The interpretation of the readings found in the I Ching is a matter of centuries of debate, and many commentators have used the book symbolically, often to provide guidance for moral decision making as informed by Taoism and Confucianism. The hexagrams themselves have often acquired cosmological significance and paralleled with many other traditional names for the processes of change such as yin and yang and Wu Xing.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781979748919
Publisher: CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date: 11/14/2017
Pages: 372
Product dimensions: 5.00(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.77(d)

About the Author

The I Ching, or Book of Changes, is the most widely read of the five Chinese Classics. The book was traditionally written by the legendary Chinese Emperor Fu Hsi (2953-2838 B.C.). It is possible that the the I Ching originated from a prehistoric divination technique which dates back as far as 5000 B.C

Read an Excerpt

CHAPTER 1

I. THE KHIEN HEXAGRAM.

Explanation of the entire figure by king Wan.

Khhien (represents) what is great and originating, penetrating, advantageous, correct and firm.

Explanation of the separate lines by the duke of Kau.

I. In the first (or lowest) line, undivided, (we see its subject as) the dragon lying hid (in the deep). It is not the time for active doing.

2. I n the second line, undivided, (we see its subject as) the dragon appearing in the field. I t will be advantageous to meet with the great man.

3. In the third line, undivided, (we see its subject as) the superior man active and vigilant all the day, and in the evening still careful and apprehensive. (The position is) dangerous, but there will be no mistake.

4. In the fourth line, undivided, (we see its subject as the dragon looking) as if he were leaping up, but still in the deep. There will be no mistake.

5. In the fifth line, undivided, (we see its subject as) the dragon on the wing in the sky. It will be advantageous to meet with the great man.

6. In the sixth (or topmost) line, undivided, (we see its subject as) the dragon exceeding the proper limits. There will be occasion for repentance.

7. (The lines of this hexagram are all strong and undivided, as appears from) the use of the number nine. If the host of dragons (thus) appearing were to divest themselves of their heads, there would be good fortune.

II. The Khwan Hexagram.

Khwan (represents) what is great and originating, penetrating, advantageous, correct and having the firmness of a mare. When the superior man (here intended) has to make any movement, if he take the initiative, he will go astray ; if he follow, he will find his (proper) lord. The advantageousness will be seen in his getting friends in the south-west, and losing friends in the north-east. If he rest in correct ness and firmness, there will be good fortune.

1. I n the first line, divided, (we see its subject) treading on hoarfrost. The strong ice will come (by and by).

2. The second line, divided, (shows the attribute of) being straight, square, and great. (Its operation), without repeated efforts, will be in every respect advantageous.

3. The third line, divided, (shows its subject) keeping his excellence under restraint, but firmly maintaining it. If he should have occasion to engage in the king's service, though he will not claim the success (for himself ), he will bring affairs to a good issue.

4. The fourth line, divided, (shows the symbol of) a sack tied up. There will be no ground for blame or for praise.

5. The fifth line, divided, (shows) the yellow lower garment. There will be great good fortune.

6. The sixth line, divided, (shows) dragons fighting in the wild. Their blood is purple and yellow.

7. (The lines of this hexagram are all weak and divided, as appears from) the use of the n umber six. If those (who are thus represented) be perpetually correct and firm, advantage will arise.

III. The Kun Hexagram.

Kun (indicates that in the case which it pre-supposes) there will be great progress and success, and the advantage will come from being correct and firm. (But) any movement in advance should not be (lightly) undertaken. There will be advantage in appointing feudal princes.

I. The first line, undivided, shows the difficulty (its subject has) in advancing. I t will be advantageous for him to abide correct and firm ; advantageous (also) to be made a feudal ruler.

2. The second line, divided, shows (its subject) distressed and obliged to return ; (even) the horses of her chariot (also) seem to be retreating. (But) not by a spoiler (is she assailed), but by one who seeks her to be his wife. The young lady maintains her firm correctness, and declines a union. After ten years she will be united, and have children.

3. The third line, divided, shows one following the deer without (the guidance of) the forester, and only finding himself in the midst of the forest. The superior man, acquainted with the secret risks, thinks it better to give up the chase. If he went forward, he would regret it.

4. The fourth line, divided, shows (its subject as a lady), the horses of whose chariot appear in retreat. She seeks, however, (the help of ) him who seeks her to be his wife. Advance will be fortunate ; all will turn out advantageously.

5. The fifth line, undivided, shows the difficulties in the way of (its subject's) dispensing the rich favours that might be expected from him. With firmness and correctness there will be good fortune in small things ; (even) with them in great things there will be evil.

6. The topmost line, divided, shows (its subject) with the horses of his chariot obliged to retreat, and weeping tears of blood in streams.

IV. The Mang Hexagram.

Mang (indicates that in the case which it pre-supposes) there will be progress and success. I do not (go and) seek the youthful and inexperienced, but he comes and seeks me. When he shows (the sincerity that marks) the first recourse to divination, I instruct him. If he apply a second and third time, that is troublesome ; and I do not instruct the troublesome. There will be advantage in being firm and correct.

1. The first line, divided, (has respect to) the dispelling of ignorance. It will be advantageous to use punishment (for that purpose), and to remove the shackles (from the mind). But going on in that way (of punishment) will give occasion for regret.

2. The second line, undivided, (shows its subject) exercising forbearance with the ignorant, in which there will be good fortune ; and admitting (even) the goodness of women, which will also be fortunate. (He may be described also as) a son able to (sustain the burden of) his family.

3. The third line, divided, (seems to say) that one should not marry a woman whose emblem it might be, for that, when she sees a man of wealth, she will not keep her person from him, and in no wise will advantage come from her.

4. The fourth line, divided, (shows its subject as if) bound in chains of ignorance. There will be occasion for regret.

5. The fifth line, divided, shows its subject as a simple lad without experience. There will be good fortune.

6. In the topmost line, undivided, we see one smiting the ignorant (youth). But no advantage will come from doing him an injury. Advantage would come from warding off injury from him.

V. The Hsu Hexagram.

Hsu intimates that, with the sincerity which is declared in it, there will be brilliant success. With firmness there will be good fortune ; and it will be advantageous to cross the great stream.

1. The first line, undivided, shows its subject waiting in the distant border. I t will be well for him constantly to maintain (the purpose thus shown), in which case there will be no error.

2. The second line, undivided, shows its subject waiting on the sand (of the mountain stream). He will (suffer) the small (injury of) being spoken (against), but in the end there will be good fortune.

3. The third line, undivided, shows its subject in the mud (close by the stream). He thereby invites the approach of injury.

4. The fourth line, divided, shows its subject waiting in (the place of) blood. But he will get out of the cavern.

5. The fifth line, undivided, shows its subject waiting amidst the appliances of a feast. Through his firmness and correctness there will be good fortune.

6. The topmost line, divided, shows its subject entered into the cavern. (But) there are three guests coming, without being urged, (to his help).

If he receive them respectfully, there will be good fortune in the end.

VI. The Sung Hexagram.

Sung intimates how, though there is sincerity in one's contention, he will yet meet with opposition and obstruction ; but if he cherish an apprehensive caution, there will be good fortune, while, if he must prosecute the contention to the (bitter) end, there will be evil. It will be advantageous to see the great man ; it will not be advantageous to cross the great stream.

1. The first line, divided, shows its subject not perpetuating the matter about which (the contention is). He will suffer the small (injury) of being spoken against, but the end will be fortunate.

2. The second line, undivided, shows its subject unequal to the contention. If he retire and keep concealed (where) the inhabitants of his city are (only) three hundred families, he will fall into no mistake.

3. The third line, divided, shows its subject keeping in the old place assigned for his support, and firmly correct. Perilous as the position is, there will be good fortune in the end. Should he perchance engage in the king's business, he will not (claim the merit of) achievement.

4. The fourth line, undivided, shows its subject unequal to the contention. He returns to (the study of Heaven's) ordinances, changes (his wish to contend), and rests in being firm and correct. There will be good fortune.

5. The fifth line, undivided, shows its subject contending ;— and with great good fortune.

6. The topmost line, undivided, shows how its subject may have the leathern belt conferred on him (by the sovereign), and thrice it shall be taken from him in a morning.

VII. The Sze Hexagram.

Sze indicates how, in the case which it supposes, with firmness and correctness, and (a leader of) age and experience, there will be good fortune and no error.

1. The first line, divided, shows the host going forth according to the rules (for such a movement). If these be not good, there will be evil.

2. The second line, undivided, shows (the leader) in the midst of the host. There will be good fortune and no error. The king has thrice conveyed to him the orders (of his favour).

3. The third line, divided, shows how the host may, possibly, have many inefficient leaders. There will be evil.

4. The fourth line, divided, shows the host in retreat. There is no error.

5. The fifth line, divided, shows birds in the fields, which it will be advantageous to seize (and destroy). I n that case there will be no error. If the oldest son leads the host, and younger men (idly occupy offices assigned to them), however firm and correct he may be, there will be evil.

6. The topmost line, divided, shows the great ruler delivering his charges, (appointing some) to be rulers of states, and others to undertake the headship of clans ; but small men should not be employed (in such positions).

VIII. The Pi Hexagram.

Pi indicates that (under the conditions which it supposes) there is good fortune. But let (the principal party intended in it) re-examine himself, (as if) by divination, whether his virtue be great, unintermitting, and firm. If it be so, there will be no error. Those who have not rest will then come to hi m ; and with those who are (too) late in coming it will be ill.

1. The first line, divided, shows its subject seeking by his sincerity to win the attachment of his object. There will be no error. Let (the breast) be full of sincerity as an earthenware vessel is of its contents, and it will in the end bring other advantages.

2. In the second line, divided, we see the movement towards union and attachment proceeding from the inward (mind). With firm correctness there will be good fortune.

3. In the third line, divided, we see its subject seeking for union with such as ought not to be associated with.

4. In the fourth line, divided, we see its subject seeking for union with the one beyond himself. With firm correctness there will be good fortune.

5. The fifth line, undivided, affords the most illustrious instance of seeking union and attachment. (We seem to see in it) the king urging his pursuit of the game (only) in three directions, and allowing the escape of all the animals before him, while the people of his towns do not warn one another (to prevent it). There will be good fortune.

6. I n the topmost line, divided, we see one seeking union and attachment ·without having taken the first step (to such an end). There will be evil.

IX. The Hsiao Khu Hexagram.

Hsiao Khu indicates that (under its conditions) there will be progress and success. (We see) dense clouds, but no rain coming from our borders in the west.

1. The first line, undivided, shows its subject returning and pursuing his own course. What mistake should he fall into ? There will be good fortune.

2. The second line, undivided, shows its subject, by the attraction (of the former line), returning (to the proper course). There will be good fortune.

3. The third line, undivided, suggests the idea of a carriage, the strap beneath which has been removed, or of a husband and wife looking on each other with averted eyes.

4. The fourth line, divided, shows its subject possessed of sincerity. The danger of bloodshed is thereby averted, and his (ground for) apprehension dismissed. There will be no mistake.

5. The fifth line, undivided, shows its subject possessed of sincerity, and drawing others to unite with him. Rich in resources, he employs his neighbours (in the same cause with himself).

6. The topmost line, undivided, shows how the rain has fallen, and the (onward progress) is stayed ; -(so) must we value the full accumulation of the virtue (represented by the upper trigram). But a wife (exercising restraint), however firm and correct she may be, is in a position of peril, (and like) the moon approaching to the full. If the superior man prosecute his measures (in such circumstances), there will be evil.

X. The Li Hexagram.

(Li suggests the idea of) one treadi ng on the tail of a tiger, which does not bite him. There will be progress and success.

1. The first line, undivided, shows its subject treading his accustomed path. If he go forward, there will be no error.

2. The second line, undivided, shows its subject treading the path that is level and easy — a quiet and solitary man, to whom, if he be firm and correct, there will be good fortune.

3. The third line, divided, shows a one-eyed man (who thinks he) can see ; a lame man (who thinks he) can walk well ; one who treads on the tail of a tiger and is bitten. (All this indicates) ill fortune. 'We have a (mere) bravo acting the part of a great ruler.

4. The fourth line, undivided, shows its subject treading on the tail of a tiger. He becomes full of apprehensive caution, and in the end there will be good fortune.

5. The fifth line, undivided, shows the resolute tread of its subject. Though he be firm and correct, there will be peril.

6. The sixth line, undivided, tells us to look at (the whole course) that is trodden, and examine the the presage which that gives. If it be complete and without failure, there will be great good fortune.

XI. The Thai Hexagram

In Thai (we see) the little gone and the great come. (I t indicates that) there will be good fortune, with progress and success.

1. The first line, undivided, suggests the idea of grass pulled up, and bringing with it other stalks with whose roots it is connected. Advance (on the part of its subject) will be fortunate.

2. The second line, undivided, shows one who can bear with the uncultivated, will cross the Ho without a boat, does not forget the distant, and has no (selfish) friendships. Thus does he prove himself acting in accordance with the course of the due Mean.

3. The third line, undivided, shows that, while there is no state of peace that is not liable to be disturbed, and no departure (of evil men) so that they shall not return, yet when one is firm and correct, as he realises the distresses that may arise, he will commit no error. There is no occasion for sadness at the certainty (of such recurring changes) ; and in this mood the happiness (of the present) may be (long) enjoyed.

4. The fourth line, divided, shows its subject fluttering (down) ; — not relying on his own rich resources, but calling in his neighbours. come) not as having received warning, sincerity (of their hearts).

5. The fifth line, divided, reminds us of (king) Ti-yi's (rule about the) marriage of his younger sister. By such a course there is happiness and there will be great good fortune.

6. The sixth line, divided, shows us the city wall returned into the moat. It is not the time to use the army. (The subject of the line) may, indeed, announce his orders to the people of his own city ; but however correct and firm he may be, he will have cause for regret.

XII. The Phi Hexagram.

In Phi there is the want of good understanding between the (different classes of) men, and its indication is unfavourable to the firm and correct course of the superior man. We see in it the great gone and the little come.

1. The first line, divided, suggests the idea of grass pulled up, and bringing with it other stalks with whose roots it is connected. With firm correctness (on the part of its subject), there will be good fortune and progress.

2. The second line, divided, shows its subject patient and obedient. To the small man (comporting himself so) there will be good fortune. If the great man (comport himself) as the distress and obstruction require, he will have success.

3. The third line, divided, shows its subject ashamed of the purpose folded (in his breast).

4. The fourth line, undivided, shows its subject acting in accordance with the ordination (of Heaven), and committing no error. His companions will come and share in his happiness.

5. In the fifth line, undivided, we see him who brings the distress and obstruction to a close, the great man and fortunate. (But let him say), ' We may perish! We may perish!' (so shall the state of things become firm, as if ) bound to a clump of bushy mulberry trees.

6. The sixth line, undivided, shows the overthrow (and removal of ) the condition of distress and obstruction. Before this there was that condition. Hereafter there will be joy.

(Continues…)


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Excerpted by permission of Dover Publications, Inc..
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Table of Contents

Contents

DOVER BOOKS ON THE OCCULT,
The Sacred Books of the East,
Title Page,
Copyright Page,
PREFACE.,
INTRODUCTION.,
THE YÎ KING.,
TEXT. SECTION I. - I. THE KHIEN HEXAGRAM.,
II. THE KHWN HEXAGRAM.,
III. THE KUN HEXAGRAM.,
IV. THE MNG HEXAGRAM.,
V. THE HSÜ HEXAGRAM.,
VI. THE SUNG HEXAGRAM.,
VII. THE SZE HEXAGRAM.,
VIII. THE PÎ HEXAGRAM.,
IX. THE HSIÂO KHÛ HEXAGRAM.,
X. THE LÎ HEXAGRAM.,
XI. THE THÂI HEXAGRAM.,
XII. THE PHÎ HEXAGRAM.,
XIII. THE THUNG ZN HEXAGRAM.,
XIV. THE TÂ YÛ HEXAGRAM.,
XV. THE KHIEN HEXAGRAM.,
XVI. THE YÜ HEXAGRAM.,
XVII. THE SUI HEXAGRAM.,
XVIII. THE KÛ HEXAGRAM.,
XIX. THE LIN HEXAGRAM.,
XX. THE KWÂN HEXAGRAM.,
XXI. THE SHIH HO HEXAGRAM.,
XXII. THE PÎ HEXAGRAM.,
XXIII. THE PO HEXAGRAM.,
XXIV. THE FÛ HEXAGRAM.,
XXV. THE WÛ WANG HEXAGRAM.,
XXVI. THE TÂ KHÛ HEXAGRAM.,
XXVII. THE Î HEXAGRAM.,
XXVIII. THE TÂ KWO HEXAGRAM.,
XXIX. THE KHAN HEXAGRAM.,
XXX. THE LÎ HEXAGRAM.,
TEXT. SECTION II.,
XXXI. THE HSIEN HEXAGRAM.,
XXXII. THE HANG HEXAGRAM.,
XXXIII. THE THUN HEXAGRAM.,
XXXIV. THE TÂ KWANG HEXAGRAM.,
XXXV. THE IN HEXAGRAM.,
XXXVI. THE MING Î HEXAGRAM.,
XXXVII. THE KIÂ ZN HEXAGRAM.,
XXXVIII. THE KHWEI HEXAGRAM.,
XXXIX. THE KIEN HEXAGRAM.,
XL. THE KIEH HEXAGRAM.,
XLI. THE SUN HEXAGRAM.,
XLII. THE YÎ HEXAGRAM.,
XLIII. THE KWÂI HEXAGRAM.,
XLIV. THE KÂU HEXAGRAM.,
XLV. THE HUI HEXAGRAM.,
XLVI. THE SHNG HEXAGRAM.,
XLVII. THE KHWN HEXAGRAM.,
XLVIII. THE ING HEXAGRAM.,
XLIX. THE KO HEXAGRAM.,
L. THE TING HEXAGRAM.,
LI. THE KN HEXAGRAM.,
LII. THE KN HEXAGRAM.,
LIII. THE KIEN HEXAGRAM.,
LIV. THE KWEI MEI HEXAGRAM.,
LV. THE FNG HEXAGRAM.,
LVI. THE LÜ HEXAGRAM.,
LVII. THE SUN HEXAGRAM.,
LVIII. THE TUI HEXAGRAM.,
LIX. THE HWÂN HEXAGRAM.,
LX. THE KIEH HEXAGRAM.,
LXI. THE KUNG FÛ HEXAGRAM.,
LXII. THE HSIÂO KWO HEXAGRAM.,
LXIII. THE Kî 3î HEXAGRAM.,
LXIV. THE WEI 3î HEXAGRAM.,
THE APPENDIXES.,

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