The Hound of the Baskervilles (150th Anniversary Edition)

The Hound of the Baskervilles (150th Anniversary Edition)

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Overview

Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson face a mystery on the moors in this classic caper from Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

The country doctor had come to 221B Baker Street, the famous lodgings of Sherlock Holmes, with an eerie tale—the legend of the Hound of the Baskervilles, the devil-beast that haunted the lonely moors around the Baskervilles’ ancestral home. The tale warned the descendants of that ancient family never to venture out on the moor. But Sir Charles Baskerville was now dead—and the footprints of a giant hound have been found near his body. Would the new heir of the Baskervilles meet the same dreadful fate? Sherlock Holmes and his faithful friend, Dr. Watson, are faced with their most terrifying case in this wonderful classic of masterful detection and bone-chilling suspense.
 
Includes an Afterword by Anne Perry

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780451528018
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 07/10/2001
Series: Signet Classics Series
Edition description: 150th Anniversary Edition
Pages: 256
Sales rank: 22,514
Product dimensions: 6.90(w) x 10.90(h) x 0.74(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was born in Edinburgh in 1859. After nine years in Jesuit schools, he went to Edinburgh University, where he received a degree in medicine in 1881. He then became an eye specialist in Southsea, with a distressing lack of success. Hoping to augment his income, he wrote his first story, A Study in Scarlet. His detective, Sherlock Holmes, was modeled in part after Dr. Joseph Bell of the Edinburgh Infirmary, a man with spectacular powers of observation, analysis, and inference. Conan Doyle may have been influenced also by his admiration for the neat plots of Gaboriau and for Poe’s detective, M. Dupin. After several rejections, the story was sold to a British publisher for £25, and thus was born the world’s best-known and most-loved fictional detective. Fifty-nine more Sherlock Holmes adventures followed. Once, wearying of Holmes, his creator killed him off, but was forced by popular demand to resurrect him. Sir Arthur—he was knighted for his defense of the British cause in The Great Boer War—became an ardent spiritualist after the death of his son Kingsley, who had been wounded at the Somme in World War I. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle died in Sussex in 1930.

Date of Birth:

May 22, 1859

Date of Death:

July 7, 1930

Place of Birth:

Edinburgh, Scotland

Place of Death:

Crowborough, Sussex, England

Education:

Edinburgh University, B.M., 1881; M.D., 1885

Read an Excerpt

Table of Contents

 
Title Page

Copyright Page

Dedication

 
Chapter 1 - Mr. Sherlock Holmes

Chapter 2 - The Curse of the Baskervilles

Chapter 3 - The Problem

Chapter 4 - Sir Henry Baskerville

Chapter 5 - Three Broken Threads

Chapter 6 - Baskerville Hall

Chapter 7 - The Stapletons of Merripit House

Chapter 8 - First Report of Dr. Watson

Chapter 9 - Second Report of Dr. Watson

Chapter 10 - Extract from the Diary of Dr. Watson

Chapter 11 - The Man on the Tor

Chapter 12 - Death on the Moor

Chapter 13 - Fixing the Nets

Chapter 14 - The Hound of the Baskervilles

Chapter 15 - A Retrospection

 
Afterword

Selected Bibliography

BIOGRAPHY AND CRITICISM

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was born in Edinburgh in 1859. After nine years in Jesuit schools, he went to Edinburgh University, where he received a degree in medicine in 1881. He then became an eye specialist in Southsea, with a distressing lack of success. Hoping to augment his income, he wrote his first story, A Study in Scarlet. His detective, Sherlock Holmes, was modeled in part after Dr. Joseph Bell of the Edinburgh Infirmary, a man with spectacular powers of observation, analysis, and inference. Conan Doyle may have been influenced also by his admiration for the neat plots of Gaboriau and for Poe’s detective, M. Dupin. After several rejections, the story was sold to a British publisher for £25, and thus was born the world’s best-known and most-loved fictional detective. Fifty-nine more Sherlock Holmes adventures followed. Once, wearying of Holmes, his creator killed him off, but was forced by popular demand to resurrect him. Sir Arthur—he was knighted for his defense of the British cause in The Great Boer War—became an ardent spiritualist after the death of his son Kingsley, who had been wounded at the Somme in World War I. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle died in Sussex in 1930.

 
With more than ten million copies sold worldwide, Anne Perry is indisputably one of the world’s most popular mystery writers. She is noted for her memorable characters, historical accuracy, and exploration of social and ethical issues. Her story “Heroes” won the 2000 Edgar Award for the short story. She lives in a small fishing village on the remote North Sea coast of Scotland.

SIGNET CLASSICS Published by New American Library, a division of Penguin Group (USA) Inc., 375 Hudson Street,
 
Penguin Books Ltd., Registered Offices:
 
Published by Signet Classics, an imprint of New American Library,
 
First Signet Classics Printing, July 1986
 
eISBN : 978-1-101-09839-4

All rights reserved

 
REGISTERED TRADEMARK—MARCA REGISTRADA

 
 
 
The scanning, uploading, and distribution of this book via the Internet or via any other means without the permission of the publisher is illegal and punishable by law. Please purchase only authorized electronic editions, and do not participate in or encourage electronic piracy of copyrighted materials. Your support of the author’s rights is appreciated.

DEDICATION

 
MY DEAR ROBINSON: It was your account of a west country legend which first suggested the idea of this little tale to my mind. For this, and for the help which you gave me in its evolution, all thanks.

Yours most truly,
Chapter 1

Mr. Sherlock Holmes

MR. SHERLOCK HOLMES, who was usually very late in the mornings, save upon those not infrequent occasions when he was up all night, was seated at the breakfast table. I stood upon the hearth-rug and picked up the stick which our visitor had left behind him the night before. It was a fine, thick piece of wood, bulbous-headed, of the sort which is known as a “Penang lawyer.” Just under the head was a broad silver band, nearly an inch across. “To James Mortimer, M.R.C.S., from his friends of the C.C.H.,” was engraved upon it, with the date “1884.” It was just such a stick as the old-fashioned family practitioner used to carry—dignified, solid, and reassuring.

“Well, Watson, what do you make of it?”

Holmes was sitting with his back to me, and I had given him no sign of my occupation.

“How did you know what I was doing? I believe you have eyes in the back of your head.”

“I have, at least, a well-polished, silver-plated coffee-pot in front of me,” said he. “But, tell me, Watson, what do you make of our visitor’s stick? Since we have been so unfortunate as to miss him and have no notion of his errand, this accidental souvenir becomes of importance. Let me hear you reconstruct the man by an examination of it.”

“I think,” said I, following as far as I could the methods of my companion, “that Dr. Mortimer is a successful, elderly medical man, well-esteemed, since those who know him give him this mark of their appreciation.”

“Good!” said Holmes. “Excellent!”

“I think also that the probability is in favour of his being a country practitioner who does a great deal of his visiting on foot.”

(Continues…)



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