The Genius of Nathaniel Hawthorne (Large Print)

The Genius of Nathaniel Hawthorne (Large Print)

by Anthony Trollope

Paperback(Large Print)

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Overview

Originally published in 1879, The Genius of Nathaniel Hawthorne is one of the best early summaries of Hawthorne's work. It is a scholarly work that appeared in The North American Review, Volume 129.





Nathaniel Hawthorne (July 4, 1804 - May 19, 1864) was an American novelist, Dark Romantic, and short story writer.



He was born in 1804 in Salem, Massachusetts, to Nathaniel Hathorne and the former Elizabeth Clarke Manning. His ancestors include John Hathorne, the only judge involved in the Salem witch trials who never repented of his actions. Nathaniel later added a "w" to make his name "Hawthorne" in order to hide this relation. He entered Bowdoin College in 1821, was elected to Phi Beta Kappa in 1824, and graduated in 1825. Hawthorne published his first work, a novel titled Fanshawe, in 1828; he later tried to suppress it, feeling it was not equal to the standard of his later work. He published several short stories in periodicals, which he collected in 1837 as Twice-Told Tales. The next year, he became engaged to Sophia Peabody. He worked at the Boston Custom House and joined Brook Farm, a transcendentalist community, before marrying Peabody in 1842. The couple moved to The Old Manse in Concord, Massachusetts, later moving to Salem, the Berkshires, then to The Wayside in Concord. The Scarlet Letter was published in 1850, followed by a succession of other novels. A political appointment as consul took Hawthorne and family to Europe before their return to Concord in 1860. Hawthorne died on May 19, 1864, and was survived by his wife and their three children.

-Wikipedia

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781548128135
Publisher: CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date: 06/15/2017
Edition description: Large Print
Pages: 46
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.10(d)

About the Author

Anthony Trollope ( 24 April 1815 - 6 December 1882) was an English novelist of the Victorian era. Among his best-known works is a series of novels collectively known as the Chronicles of Barsetshire, which revolves around the imaginary county of Barsetshire. He also wrote novels on political, social, and gender issues, and other topical matters.

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