The Fountain Overflows

The Fountain Overflows

by Rebecca West

NOOK BookB&N epub (eBook - B&N epub)

$8.99 $9.99 Save 10% Current price is $8.99, Original price is $9.99. You Save 10%.
View All Available Formats & Editions

Available on Compatible NOOK Devices and the free NOOK Apps.
WANT A NOOK?  Explore Now
LEND ME® See Details

Overview

A talented, eccentric London family tries to find their place in the world in this semiautobiographical novel by a New York Times–bestselling author.
 Papa Aubrey’s wife and twin daughters, Mary and Rose, are piano prodigies, his young son Richard Quin is a lively boy, and his eldest daughter Cordelia is a beautiful and driven young woman with musical aspirations. But the talented and eccentric Aubrey family rarely enjoys a moment of harmony, as its members struggle to overcome the effects of their patriarch’s spendthrift ways. Now they must move so that their father, a noted journalist, can find stable employment. Throughout, it is the Aubreys’ hope that art will save them from the cacophony of a life sliding toward poverty. In this eloquent and winning portrait, West’s compelling characters must uncover their true talent for kindness in order to thrive in the world that exists outside of their life as a family.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781453206980
Publisher: Open Road Media
Publication date: 12/21/2010
Series: The Saga of the Century Trilogy , #1
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 432
Sales rank: 1,111,617
File size: 3 MB

About the Author

Dame Rebecca West (1892–1983) is one of the most critically acclaimed English novelists, journalists, and literary critics of the twentieth century. Uniquely wide-ranging in subject matter and breathtakingly intelligent in her ability to take on the oldest and knottiest problems of human relations, West was a thoroughly entertaining public intellectual. In her eleven novels, beginning with The Return of the Soldier, she explored topics including feminism, socialism, love, betrayal, and identity. West’s prolific journalistic works include her coverage of the Nuremberg trials for the New Yorker, published as A Train of Powder, and Black Lamb and Grey Falcon, her epic study of Yugoslavia. She had a son with H.G. Wells, and later married banker Henry Maxwell Andrews, continuing to write, and publish, until she died in London at age ninety.

Dame Rebecca West (1892–1983) is one of the most critically acclaimed and bestselling English novelists, journalists, and literary critics of the twentieth century. In her eleven novels, beginning with The Return of the Soldier, she delved into the psychological landscape of her characters and explored topics including feminism, socialism, love, betrayal, and identity. She was lauded for her wit and intellectual acuity, evident in her prolific journalistic works such as her coverage of the Nuremberg trials for the New Yorker, published as A Train of Powder, and Black Lamb and Grey Falcon, her epic study of Yugoslavia and its people. She had a child with H.G. Wells, but married banker Henry Maxwell Andrews later in life and continued writing until she died in London at age ninety.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

The Fountain Overflows 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
alwaysmlo on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
One of my all time favorite biographies. Rebecca West was a great idealist. This volume about her childhood shows her way of looking at the world, along the same lines of the opening pages of "To the Lighthouse". If you liked To the Lighthouse, you will like this book.
Oregonreader on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I had some difficulty getting into this book. Although not strictly autobiographical, West has based the characters on her family. The story revolves around the fortunes of the Aubrey family. The narrator is Rose, one of the four children of Piers, a small time newspaper editor and pamphleteer, and Clare, formerly a concert pianist who gave up her career upon marriage. Rose struck me at first as another example of the peculiarly British fictional character, the very precocious child who patronizes and condescends to the adults around her. But as I continued, I began to realize that West had created Rose with an adult eye so that she could describe their failings and weaknesses of the others while at the same time loving them with a child's unquestioning love. She describes her father with the words "sneering" and "swaggering", while expressing her adoration. The mother is so sensitive that hearing music performed by one who is not gifted makes her physically ill and yet she is the strength in the family, holding them together through poverty and disappointment. I gradually became fond of them all and fascinated by their lives. My biggest disappointment was the ending, which ends abruptly, almost as if the narrator suddenly put her pen down and had no chance to continue.
NancyKay_Shapiro on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
An all time favorite book. I've read it over and over. It's a whole world.
nmhale on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
After a sleepy start, this book took hold of me and became one of my favorite Virago reads so far. The narrator, Rose, speaks in first person to tell us the story of her family history, and I was enchanted with her precocious voice from the start. However, West also writes with a style that is extremely detailed and evocative, which initially distanced me from the book a bit. When you're just getting used to the characters, and come upon long passages describing the country or their new house, it slows down the reading momentum. Nonetheless, the writing was lovely, and Rose had a way of mixing her descriptions with her child's imaginations and memories which was charming and kept my interest. I just didn't have a hard time putting this book down, at first. Then, once I knew all the characters and felt like a part of their family, I was drawn into their world and really did have a hard time putting the book down. The plot, like the novel, required some reading before it took hold in the mind. Basically, Rose and her family are poor artists. Her mother gave up a career as a pianist to be with her husband and raise a family, and all of her children have inherited her musical genius, except one. Her husband, who is artistic in his writing and speaking, has another problem which keeps bringing the family down - he likes to waste their money. Not just on gambling (although he does that, too) but on crazy speculations and idealistic political agendas and constantly losing his job. These various threads create a lot of interweaving plot threads, and it is all viewed through the eyes of Rose, who is a young girl in elementary school. She loves her mother and her father, and she sees his flaws but she sees his sparkling character, and she loves her parents for being the unique beings that they are. Because of her artistic temperament, Rose can accept her poverty because she has her art, and her sister Mary and her brother Richard Quin, feel the same way. Her sister Cordelia, however, the only child to not inherit her mother's gift, just wants a normal life, and resents her family's oddity. Their relationships are complex, and they form equally complicated relationships with other people around them. Just watching these interactions are interesting enough, but when you add the family's financial turmoil, the childhood fancies and imaginations, the murder subplot, and Cordelia's musical catastrophes, you end up with an engrossing family epic. Like other novels that are well crafted, and are focused on telling a comprehensive story with developed characters and themes and metaphors, this is a story you will want to sink into with time and effort. It's beautiful, and can be heart lifting and tragic in turns, and will make you want to read more about the family. West was intending to make this a long series, and while she never completed that dream, this book can stand well on its own, and is well worth your time.