The Complete Peanuts 1997-1998

The Complete Peanuts 1997-1998

Hardcover

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Overview

Charlie Brown gets involved in a sports memorabilia forgery ring and Snoopy gets his driver’s license in the penultimate volume of the best-selling comic strip reprint series.


Even the most devoted Peanuts fan will be surprised by revisiting Schulz’s last decade of work. Schulz’s cartooning has never been more expressive, and his sense of humor never more unencumbered by formula or tradition. In this volume, Charlie Brown gets caught up in a fake celebrity autographs racket, Rerun gets accused of sexual harassment, the infamous “Crybaby” Boobie returns, Snoopy’s brothers go on a quest to find Mickey Mouse, Snoopy gets his driver’s license, Rerun continues to pursue the underground arts, Linus starts his own church of Great Pumpkin believers and is declared a false prophet, and other surprises that make these last few years of Peanuts ripe for reconsideration. This is the 24th volume (of 25) of the bestselling series collecting every single one of the 18,000-plus strips created by Schulz from 1950-2000. Also available is the holiday boxed set, offering Vols. 23 and 24.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781606998601
Publisher: Fantagraphics Books
Publication date: 11/09/2015
Series: Complete Peanuts Series
Pages: 344
Sales rank: 82,942
Product dimensions: 6.60(w) x 8.60(h) x 1.30(d)
Age Range: 16 Years

About the Author

Charles M. Schulz was born November 25, 1922, in Minneapolis. His destiny was foreshadowed when an uncle gave him, at the age of two days, the nickname Sparky (after the racehorse Spark Plug in the newspaper strip Barney Google).
In his senior year in high school, his mother noticed an ad in a local newspaper for a correspondence school, Federal Schools (later called Art Instruction Schools). Schulz passed the talent test, completed the course, and began trying, unsuccessfully, to sell gag cartoons to magazines. (His first published drawing was of his dog, Spike, and appeared in a 1937 Ripley's Believe It or Not! installment.) Between 1948 and 1950, he succeeded in selling 17 cartoons to the Saturday Evening Post—as well as, to the local St. Paul Pioneer Press, a weekly comic feature called Li'l Folks. It was run in the women's section and paid $10 a week. After writing and drawing the feature for two years, Schulz asked for a better location in the paper or for daily exposure, as well as a raise. When he was turned down on all three counts, he quit.
He started submitting strips to the newspaper syndicates. In the spring of 1950, he received a letter from the United Feature Syndicate, announcing their interest in his submission, Li'l Folks. Schulz boarded a train in June for New York City; more interested in doing a strip than a panel, he also brought along the first installments of what would become Peanuts—and that was what sold. (The title, which Schulz loathed to his dying day, was imposed by the syndicate.) The first Peanuts daily appeared October 2, 1950; the first Sunday, January 6, 1952.
Diagnosed with cancer, Schulz retired from Peanuts at the end of 1999. He died on February 13, 2000, the day before Valentine's Day—and the day before his last strip was published—having completed 17,897 daily and Sunday strips, each and every one fully written, drawn, and lettered entirely by his own hand—an unmatched achievement in comics.

Paul Feig was born in Michigan. He co-created the seminal television series Freaks and Geeks, directed the blockbuster hit Bridesmaids in 2011, and has been nominated for five Emmy awards. Feig produced the upcoming Peanuts animated film and is helming the new Ghostbusters movie.

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