The Caine Mutiny

The Caine Mutiny

by Herman Wouk

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Overview

Winner of the Pulitzer Prize and a perennial favorite of readers young and old, Herman Wouk's masterful World War II drama set aboard a U.S. Navy warship in the Pacific is"a novel of brilliant virtuosity" (Times Literary Supplement).
Herman Wouk's boldly dramatic, brilliantly entertaining novel of life--and mutiny--on a Navy warship in the Pacific theater was immediately embraced, upon its original publication in 1951, as one of the first serious works of American fiction to grapple with the moral complexities and the human consequences of World War II.
In the intervening half century, The Caine Mutiny has sold millions of copies throughout the world, and has achieved the status of a modern classic.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780316248563
Publisher: Little, Brown and Company
Publication date: 01/15/2013
Sold by: Hachette Digital, Inc.
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 560
Sales rank: 38,482
File size: 1 MB

About the Author

Herman Wouk's acclaimed novels include the Pulitzer Prize-winning The Caine Mutiny; Marjorie Morningstar; Don't Stop the Carnival; Youngblood Hawke; The Winds of War; War and Remembrance; Inside, Outside; The Hope; The Glory; and A Hole in Texas.

Customer Reviews

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The Caine Mutiny (SparkNotes Literature Guide Series) 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 37 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The first few chapters were very boring. But once you got to page 250 or something like that (near the climax), it got really exciting. I liked how Mr. Wouk described the character of the neurotic Captain Queeg. I also thought the conclusion was written very beautifully. Hats off to Mr. Wouk.
momma2 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This book was on a must read list so I picked it up. It was an easy enough read but nothing terribly deep or thought provoking.
agnesmack on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I'm not sure how much my opinion of this book benefited from having read a slew of WWII novels ahead of it. I still have an unfortunate number of WWII novels to get through before the year is over, but this is easily the best of the ones I've read so far. I don't know if that's because it was actually good, or if just being readable was such a leg up from the others that I am judging it favorably.The main difference between this and the other WWII novels I've read was that they were all about WWII, or the military, while this one was actually about a person - who happened to be serving in the military.The war and the NAVY were definitely very present, and the entire plot was centered around this boy, Willie, learning the ropes. But everything was secondary to him, as a person.It was also the only of the WWII novels that assumed I knew nothing about military rank and regulations. The book started well before Willie joined the NAVY, and their jargon and procedures were as foreign to him as they were to me. Everything was presented through the eyes of someone trying to figure things out, and together we did just that. Compared to constantly having to look up military abbreviations and googling ranks to figure out how important a General is, as I've been forced to do with other similar novels, The Caine Mutiny was a joy to read.
santhony on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Many years ago, I read Winds of War and War and Remembrance. For whatever reason, I neglected to read Wouk's earlier works, including the widely acclaimed Caine Mutiny. Recently, I had the occasion to read Youngblood Hawke, and as a result made a concerted effort to explore other Wouk novels. Of course, I was familiar with The Caine Mutiny as a result of having seen the film classic starring Humphrey Bogart as the infamous Captain Queeg. I have to admit that previously seeing the movie detracted somewhat from the reading experience. Though the book was every bit as good as the movie (better in fact), knowing many of the details in advance spoiled much of the suspense that might have existed otherwise. Despite physical descriptions, I automatically pictured Bogart fondling the ball bearings or Fred McMurray as the pompous, holier than thou Keefer. Having said that, even having seen the movie, reading this work was utterly captivating. Rarely have I read a book that better shines light on the human psyche and human nature in the face of sometimes overwhelming pressure and stress. There are so many fascinating characters in this book, from the obvious (Queeg and Willie) to the seemingly peripheral but nevertheless vital (Keefer, Maryk). The story thread involving Mae, I thought was really unnecessary and perhaps filler, though it allowed the author to more fully explore the character of Willie. The complaints of naval jargon are valid, though in truth, knowledge of technical naval maneuvers or terminology is by no means necessary for enjoyment of the work. Understanding of the issues involved is easily discerned by context and is usually not central to the task of following the story. If you've never read this novel, you owe it to yourself to invest the time. If you have not seen the movie, I particularly recommend the book. Unquestionably, one of the finest war novels ever written. Having recently read Youngblood Hawke and now The Caine Mutiny, I can only say, it's on to Marjorie Morningstar.
jayne_charles on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I was in the school library at the age of 14 and about to borrow an Enid Blyton (at the age of 14! The shame of it!!) when my English teacher Mrs Straughan saw me, tut-tutted loudly and gave me this book instead. I was horrified. Some piece of historical fiction about some Americans in the Navy in World War II. So far out of my comfort zone it might as well have been on Mars. 'You'll really enjoy it', Mrs Straughan assured me. And she was right. Not only did I enjoy it the first time, I enjoyed it the twenty or so other times I read it since. Funny, informative, exciting, perceptive. This story has a special place on my bookshelf.
pfax on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Riveting read. I read this in a span of 10 days, which, for me, is a very fast pace. The romance was very convincing and mutiny trial took some great twists and turns.
Smiley on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The slow motion mutiny during wartime. The tension on board the Caine builds drip by drip. The parallel love story is a perfect counterpoint to the mutiny. There is even a suprise ending. Drop into another world for a while. Addictive reading.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is simply my favorite book ever. It holds your attention from page one. I have read this book and watched the movie countless times and enjoy it every single time. Wouk is a genius of historical fiction. Check out Winds of War and War and Remembrance as well.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Having read other books by herman Wouk I was expecting to run into occasional lags in the story. However, I was pleasantly surprised. The story moves quickly and is easily read. Nautical terms which may not be known, can easily be picked up in context, and the multiple plots weave and relate to each other throughout. I really enjoyed this book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Grea t book
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Tim44 More than 1 year ago
More depth than the movie.
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