Test Yourself MCSE Designing a Windows 2000 Network (Exam 70-221)

Test Yourself MCSE Designing a Windows 2000 Network (Exam 70-221)

by Syngress Media Inc (Conducted by)

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Overview

Don't let the real test be your first test! Osborne's MCSE Designing a Windows 2000 Network Test Yourself Practice Exams contains hundreds of practice questions for exam 70-221. The book is organized by official exam objective and contains in-depth answers that explain why the correct options are right and why the incorrect options are wrong. Plus,a key code in the book entitles you to download full practice exam software from our site!

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More Questions - More Content

  • Based on the MCSE Designing a Microsoft Windows 2000 Network Infrastructure exam (70-221)
  • Coverage features quick review of all technology objectives and more than 200 realistic exam questions to build your knowledge
  • Includes free MCSE ExamSim Volume II practice exam.
  • Exclusive "Exam Watch" features point out the most frequently missed questions — and how to answer them correctly

Answers provide in-depth explanations,and show why the incorrect choices are wrong,as shown below:

  • You are the administrator for two Windows 2000 domains in a publishing company. Each domain has its own set of services (i. e.,a separate DNS,DHCP,etc). You want to bring up an additional DHCP server on a Windows 2000 server in stand-alone mode,simply because you want it to work for both of the existing domains. After you build the server and create the scopes on DHCP,you find that it's not assigning addresses to any clients. What is the most likely problem?

A. The scope you created is not appropriate for the physical subnetthe server is located on.

B. You neglected to authorize the server in the two domains.

C. You didn*t enable the scope on the DHCP server.

D. Your clients aren*t configured to use DHCP.

B. The most likely problem is that you failed to authorize your new DHCP server in either of the two Windows 2000 domains. When a Windows 2000 DHCP server starts,it checks with the directory services to see if it is on the authorized servers list. If not,it stops itself and records an error in its event log.

A is not correct because even an incorrect scope would give out addresses. C is incorrect because the MMC would indicate that the scope had been activated. D is incorrect because we already know that the clients are working with the other DHCP servers.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780072129328
Publisher: McGraw-Hill Companies, The
Publication date: 01/01/2000
Series: Test Yourself Series
Pages: 548
Sales rank: 628,884
Product dimensions: 7.50(w) x 9.25(h) x 1.11(d)

Read an Excerpt

Chapter 1: Analyzing Business Requirements

The analysis of a company's business requirements is an important part of planning a network infrastructure. By understanding the needs of the business, you are better able to create a network that enhances the business and allows it to achieve its goals.

To develop a picture of the business requirements, you must have the ability to examine a given business scenario, taking care to uncover the business and company models, company processes, existing and planned organizational structures, and the company strategy. You will also be required to analyze the structure of the information technology (IT) management to understand its function.

Understanding Business Requirements Analysis

Business requirements are the needs and issues that must be analyzed and addressed when planning a network. Once determined, these are applied to a plan that outlines the technical specifications of a network infrastructure. Business requirements analysis isn't an exact science, but rather a calculation of trade-offs. Different factors affect the network infrastructure you create. The way a business is organized, its ability to change and accept risks, and other variables will each play a part in how a network is planned and implemented.

You need to know the various types of information that can be gathered from a business in order to conduct your analysis. This information can be gathered in a number of ways: you can interview staff members, conduct a survey, or review existing documentation. Once you have gathered the information, it needs to be organized into meaningful documents that will support the network design you are creating.

During the course of a network infrastructure design, you will create several types of documents. These include administrative documents, deployment documents, functional specifications, communication strategies, training plans, capacity plans, and a risk assessment.

Administrative documents identify the scope, goals, and objectives of the project.

Deployment documents describe the current network environment (if any), gaps between the current environment and the one envisioned, and how Windows 2000 will be integrated into the environment.

11 Functional specifications outline the required features and the details of what the network infrastructure will be.

15 Communication strategies outline how information about the project will be conveyed and how often.

Training plans outline issues dealing with how users and support staff will be educated about the new system.

Capacity plans estimate minimum, maximum, and average figures on network usage. This includes such factors as how often users log on to the network and the number of Domain Name System (DNS) queries that occur.

Risk assessments assess possible risks that the project may face and how these risks may affect the project.

The ability to analyze a business's requirements is more o f a soft skill than a hard technical requirement. However, when you sit down and begin designing your first Windows 2000 network, the data and information that you collect about the business will be just as important as the data you collect about the network. Be very detail oriented, and understand the various documents and plans that are used to capture this information...

Table of Contents

About the Contributors v
Acknowledgments vii
Preface xvii
Introduction xix
Analyzing Business Requirements
1(30)
Understanding Business Requirements Analysis
2(2)
Questions
3(1)
Analyzing the Existing and Planned Business Models
4(3)
Questions
5(2)
Analyzing the Company Model and the Geographic Scope
7(3)
Questions
8(2)
Analyzing Company Processes
10(2)
Questions
11(1)
Analyzing the Existing and Planned Organizational Structures
12(2)
Questions
13(1)
Analyzing Factors That Influence Company Strategies
14(3)
Questions
16(1)
Analyzing the Structure of IT Management
17(3)
Questions
18(2)
Lab Question
20(2)
Quick Answer Key
22(1)
In-Depth Answers
23(6)
Lab Answer
29(2)
Analyzing Technical Requirements
31(34)
Analyzing Corporate Technical Requirements
32(2)
Questions
33(1)
Evaluating the Company's Existing and Planned Technical Environments and Goals
34(4)
Questions
36(2)
Analyzing the Impact of Infrastructure Design on the Existing and Planned Technical Environments
38(4)
Questions
40(2)
Analyzing the Network Requirements for Client Computer Access
42(3)
Questions
43(2)
Analyzing the Existing Disaster Recovery Strategy
45(5)
Questions
46(4)
Lab Question
50(3)
Quick Answer Key
53(1)
In-Depth Answers
54(8)
Lab Answer
62(3)
Designing a TCP/IP Networking Strategy
65(32)
Understanding the Fundamentals of Designing TCP/IP Networking Strategies
66(2)
Questions
67(1)
Analyzing IP Subnet Requirements
68(4)
Questions
69(3)
Designing a TCP/IP Addressing and Implementation Plan
72(4)
Questions
73(3)
Measuring and Optimizing a TCP/IP Infrastructure Design
76(3)
Questions
77(2)
Integrating Software Routing into Existing Networks
79(3)
Questions
80(2)
Integrating TCP/IP with Existing WAN Connections
82(3)
Questions
83(2)
Lab Question
85(2)
Quick Answer Key
87(1)
In-Depth Answers
88(7)
Lab Answer
95(2)
Designing a DHCP Strategy
97(30)
Understanding the Windows 2000 DHCP Server
98(3)
Questions
99(2)
Integrating DHCP into a Routed Environment
101(3)
Questions
102(2)
Integrating DHCP with Windows 2000
104(3)
Questions
105(2)
Using Automatic Private Internet Protocol Addressing
107(2)
Questions
108(1)
Security Issues Related to DHCP
109(2)
Questions
110(1)
Designing a DHCP Service for Remote Locations
111(3)
Questions
112(2)
Measuring and Optimizing a DHCP Infrastructure Design
114(3)
Questions
115(2)
Lab Question
117(2)
Quick Answer Key
119(1)
In-Depth Answers
120(6)
Lab Answer
126(1)
Designing a DNS Strategy
127(30)
Understanding the Windows 2000 Dynamic DNS Server
128(2)
Questions
129(1)
Creating a DNS Namespace for the Organization
130(2)
Questions
131(1)
Creating an Integrated DNS Design
132(2)
Questions
133(1)
Creating a Secure DNS Design
134(2)
Questions
135(1)
Creating a Highly Available DNS Design
136(3)
Questions
137(2)
Measuring and Optimizing a DNS Infrastructure Design
139(3)
Questions
140(2)
Designing a DNS Deployment Strategy
142(3)
Questions
143(2)
Lab Question
145(2)
Quick Answer Key
147(1)
In-Depth Answers
148(6)
Lab Answer
154(3)
Designing a WINS Strategy
157(34)
Understanding NetBIOS Name Resolution
158(3)
Questions
159(2)
Understanding WINS
161(3)
Questions
162(2)
Integrating WINS into a Network Design Plan
164(6)
Questions
165(5)
Designing Security for WINS Communications
170(3)
Questions
171(2)
Designing a Fault-Tolerant WINS Network
173(4)
Questions
174(3)
Tuning a WINS Network
177(3)
Questions
177(3)
Lab Question
180(1)
Quick Answer Key
181(1)
In-Depth Answers
182(7)
Lab Answer
189(2)
Designing Distributed Data Access Solutions
191(30)
Understanding Distributed Data Access Solutions
192(2)
Questions
193(1)
Designing a Multiprotocol Strategy
194(4)
Questions
195(3)
Designing a Distributed File System Strategy
198(4)
Questions
199(3)
Designing a Load-Balancing Strategy
202(4)
Questions
203(3)
Windows 2000 Server Clustering
206(4)
Questions
207(3)
Lab Question
210(1)
Quick Answer Key
211(1)
In-Depth Answers
212(7)
Lab Answer
219(2)
Designing Internet Connectivity Solutions
221(34)
Designing Internet Connectivity Solutions
222(3)
Questions
223(2)
Implementing Firewall Solutions
225(4)
Questions
226(3)
Developing Routing and Remote Access Strategies
229(3)
Questions
230(2)
Understanding Windows 2000 Network Address Translation
232(4)
Questions
233(3)
Utilizing Windows 2000 Internet Connection Sharing
236(2)
Questions
236(2)
Integrating Windows 2000 with Microsoft Proxy Server, Internet Information Server, and Exchange Server
238(4)
Questions
239(3)
Lab Question
242(1)
Quick Answer Key
243(1)
In-Depth Answers
244(9)
Lab Answer
253(2)
Designing Internet Connectivity Using Microsoft Proxy Server 2.0
255(34)
Understanding Proxy Server 2.0
256(3)
Questions
257(2)
Designing a Proxy Server Network Implementation
259(5)
Questions
260(4)
Ensuring Proxy Server Security
264(4)
Questions
265(3)
Designing a Fault-Tolerant Proxy Network
268(3)
Questions
269(2)
Maximizing Proxy Server Performance
271(5)
Questions
273(3)
Lab Question
276(2)
Quick Answer Key
278(1)
In-Depth Answers
279(7)
Lab Answer
286(3)
Designing a Wide Area Network Infrastructure
289(30)
Designing a WAN Infrastructure
290(4)
Questions
291(3)
Designing a Remote Access Solution That Uses Routing and Remote Access Service
294(4)
Questions
295(3)
Integrating Authentication with Remote Authentication Dial-In User Service
298(3)
Questions
299(2)
Designing a Virtual Private Network Strategy
301(4)
Questions
302(3)
Designing an RRAS Routing Solution to Connect Locations via Demand-Dial Routing
305(2)
Questions
306(1)
Lab Question
307(1)
Quick Answer Key
308(1)
In-Depth Answers
309(7)
Lab Answer
316(3)
Designing an IPSec Implementation Strategy
319(30)
Understanding IPSec
320(2)
Questions
321(1)
Defining the Goals of IPSec on Your Network
322(3)
Questions
322(3)
Installing and Configuring IPSec
325(3)
Questions
326(2)
Implementing IPSec Security Policies
328(4)
Questions
329(3)
IPSec Planning Considerations
332(2)
Questions
332(2)
Monitoring and Optimizing IPSec
334(3)
Questions
335(2)
Lab Question
337(1)
Quick Answer Key
338(1)
In-Depth Answers
339(9)
Lab Answer
348(1)
Management and Implementation Strategies for Windows 2000
349(30)
Designing a Strategy for Monitoring and Managing Windows 2000 Network Services
350(4)
Questions
351(3)
Designing Network Services That Support Application Architecture
354(3)
Questions
355(2)
Designing a Plan for the Interaction of Windows 2000 Network Services such as WINS, DHCP, and DNS
357(5)
Questions
358(4)
Designing a Resource Strategy
362(4)
Questions
363(3)
Lab Question
366(2)
Quick Answer Key
368(1)
In-Depth Answers
369(9)
Lab Answer
378(1)
Practice Exam 379(37)
AEN Solutions Inc. Case Study
388(7)
Company Profile and History
380(8)
Questions
388(7)
New Silicon Ventures Limited Case Study
395(10)
Company Profile and History
395(4)
Questions
399(6)
Answers
405(11)
Answers
416

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