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Overview


For more than 2,000 years, seekers have turned to the Tao Te Ching (The Book of the Way and Its Virtue) for guidance from one of the world's most profound spiritual traditions. Focused on the principle of wu-wei, or naturalness and simplicity, this classic of meditative insight played a significant role in the development of Buddhist thought. Its longtime influence on Far Eastern philosophy, art, and literature extends to modern Western readers with an interest in New Age subjects. This high-quality, hardcover gift edition of the authoritative Legge translation offers readers an enduring companion on the mystical path to spiritual freedom.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780613070317
Publisher: Turtleback Books
Publication date: 08/28/1989
Pages: 107
Product dimensions: 5.42(w) x 7.92(h) x 0.64(d)
Age Range: 12 - 17 Years

About the Author


The founder of philosophical Taoism, Lao Tzu is a central figure in Chinese culture. He is traditionally acknowledged as the author of the Tao Te Ching, although the attribution — like much of Tzu's biography — is a matter of scholarly debate. According to legend, he was the longtime keeper of the imperial archives. Saddened by his contemporaries' reluctance to pursue virtue, Lao Tzu left the court. As he was crossing the Tibetan border, a guard asked him to write down his teachings, resulting in the enduring lessons of the Tao Te Ching.

Read an Excerpt

1
(Continues…)



Excerpted from "Tao Te Ching"
by Lao Tzu.
Copyright © 2010 Lao Tzu.
Excerpted by permission of Penguin Publishing Group.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Table of Contents

Lao Tzu
" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="5" border="0"Introduction

LAO TZU
Book One
Book Two
List of Passages for Comparison
Appendices:
1. The Problem of Authorship
2. The Nature of the Work
Chronological Table
Glossary
Notes

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Tao Te Ching 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 126 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a veru interesting book, but a reread (or three) may be needed to fully understand it.
AlbertWang More than 1 year ago
I am a Chinese. I like Lao Tzu's Tao Te Ching or Tao Te Sutra very much. I searched and read many English translations, but I was always not very satisfied with their translations comparing the original Chinese meanings. After I read this book, I think it is the most faithful and satisfying English version. The translator understood Lao Tzu completely and never gave excess transcendental meanings. I am wondering who is translator of this book, why there is no introduction and the biography of the translator'? I really appreciate if who can tell me the translator with his biography.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Although the introduction to this edition of the Tao Te Ching is not accurate, I highly recommend this ancient text to all seeking a higher understanding and approach to experiencing life itself. Known as an integral part of understanding Tao (or, 'the way') its purpose is well served through a series of odd paradoxes and other thought exercises. These are designed to impart a sense of higher wisdom and humaneness.
everyoneandeveryone More than 1 year ago
This book is mostly cultural. not so modern to think of. but its content are amazing. for example: "...he who knows himself is wise..." this is in fact a relevant sentence. the book contains many more principles of life, and tend to give encouragement to these who feel weak because of the way people's moral are in today's world. very educational. its just like a book of proverbs. Fiknd your way in life, but don't forget to think of others.
Anonymous 4 months ago
The translation says "the sage" is a "she", I would at least have liked to see a note defending this strange decision.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I've read this a few times over now. And it's helped me find a kind of clarity every time I read it. It may not make sense to you at first, but after reading it, I started noticing a correlation between the writings and the world around me. I return to this text every time I encounter trials in my life. After, I find a realization of what is and isn't. Read it and the other Taoist classics, and hopefully you to will find clarity in your life as well.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a standard late 19th century translation by James Legge. The text is easy to read but the Artwork sets it apart. The reproductions are of good quality with the frequent guttering of images being the only complaint; this is the one thing that always flaws an otherwise excellent book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I think a lot more people should read this book because it helps people see clearer. Young people should really read this not as a required book but as a book that can help them into their journey into adulthood.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is a fun and happy presentation of the Tao Te Ching with good translations. I would definately recommend it as both a piece of literature and art. It's the kind of book that sparks conversation on a coffee table. Peace.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a very good translation. Although there are several minor mistakes, all the basic concepts of Taoism philosophy are correctly translated. If you are interested in Taoism, this book is recommended. The problem of this book is, for general public it is a little too academic.
beau.p.laurence on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I LOVE this version. very poetic translation yet retains the simplicity and meaning
co_coyote on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
One of the classics. This translation by Jane English is one of my favorites. Plus, the pictures are wonderful. Great memories of winter camping are conjured up, for some reason.
adeptmagic on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
beautiful writing for anyone, not just those interested in oriental philosophy
heidialice on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Classic, beautifully translated (and beautiful accompanying photographs). This is comforting in its timelessness, and shakes me out of being stuck in my head. A text I return to over and over.
Pattern-chaser on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Daoist classic of oriental wisdom. Not easy to appreciate without help....
jolyon on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Still the best, overall. Have had this for 30 years and it never palls.
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