Stinking Stones and Rocks of Gold: Phosphate, Fertilizer, and Industrialization in Postbellum South Carolina

Stinking Stones and Rocks of Gold: Phosphate, Fertilizer, and Industrialization in Postbellum South Carolina

by Shepherd W. McKinley

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Overview

South Carolina Historical Society George C. Rogers Jr. Book Award


In the first book ever written about the impact of phosphate mining on the South Carolina plantation economy, Shepherd McKinley explains how the convergence of the phosphate and fertilizer industries carried long-term impacts for America and the South.

Fueling the rapid growth of lowcountry fertilizer companies, phosphate mining provided elite plantation owners a way to stem losses from emancipation. At the same time, mining created an autonomous alternative to sharecropping, enabling freed people to extract housing and labor concessions.

Stinking Stones and Rocks of Gold develops an overarching view of what can be considered one of many key factors in the birth of southern industry. This top-down, bottom-up history (business, labor, social, and economic) analyzes an alternative path for all peoples in the post-emancipation South.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780813064611
Publisher: University Press of Florida
Publication date: 11/28/2017
Series: New Perspectives on the History of the S
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 246
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.40(d)

About the Author

Shepherd W. McKinley, a senior lecturer in American history at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, is the coauthor of North Carolina: New Directions for an Old Land.

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations ix

Acknowledgments xi

Introduction 1

1 Antecedents, Precedents, and Continuities, 1800-1865 10

2 The Creation of Industry and Hope, 1865-1870 35

3 Land Miners and Hand Mining, 1867-1884 66

4 River Mining and Reconstruction Politics, 1869-1874 97

5 Convergence and the Fertilizer Industry, 1868-1884 123

Conclusions and Epilogue 153

List of Abbreviations 167

Notes 169

Bibliography 199

Index 221

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