Snow White and Rose Red

Snow White and Rose Red

by Patricia C. Wrede

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Overview

Snow White and Rose Red live on the edge of the forest that conceals the elusive border of Faerie. They know enough about Faerie lands and mortal magic to be concerned when they find two human sorcerers setting spells near the border. And when the kindly, intelligent black bear wanders into their cottage some months later, they realize the connection between his plight and the sorcery they saw in the forest. This romantic version of the classic fairy tale features an updated introduction by its editor, Terri Windling.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781101159439
Publisher: Penguin Young Readers Group
Publication date: 02/19/2009
Series: Fairy Tales Series
Sold by: Penguin Group
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 288
Sales rank: 169,001
File size: 585 KB
Age Range: 12 Years

About the Author

Patricia C. Wrede lives in Edina, Minnesota.

Table of Contents

Customer Reviews

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Snow White and Rose Red 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 36 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Wonderful. The little known fairy tale was refreshing. I love PCW's books! The language really helps bring the characters and era to life. Plus, since The Secrets of the Imortal Nicholas Flamel by Michael Scott, I love Dee.
CornerDemon on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
What a waste. I had to really hunt this book down, and finally had to special order it. I love fairy tales, and I love Patricia C. Wrede, so I thought this would be a good fit, even if it wasn't perfect. To my disappointment, however, this book was barely worth finishing. To start off with, the dialogue is in an approximation of Elizabethan English. While that's not to big a problem, often it seems rather silly that poor country folk should be using the language of the high court, and it certainly slows the reading down as you have to translate the structure of the sentences back down into something we use. It's not tragic, but its not comfortable, either.To make matters worse, the story is heavy-handed. Neither Blanche (the Snow White character) nor her sister Rosamund (Rose Red) is much more than a caricature of a personality - Blanche is all soft and quiet, with no more depth than a plate, and Rosamund is all temper and forcefulness, with nothing more to her than that. The romance is equally heavy-handed, each girl choosing her prince straight away, and leaving nothing interesting to be discovered.The only thing to keep the reader's attention was the magical matter at hand, which was the transformation of a half-faerie, half mortal prince into a bear by meddling sorcerers (with a good amount of interference from Faerie). This is intriguing, until it gets so complicated with witch-hunters, bitter servant girls, and politics that you quite lose interest.Only for those truly dedicated to Fairy Tale Retellings, and even then, I'd recommend only a library rental.
the1butterfly on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Patricia C. Wrede is so talented! This is a favorite fairy tale of mine, and she told the tale in a way that made sense. It would have been an awesome story weaving together the land of faery, Elizabethan England, a bit of romance, and a lot of magic, even without the fairy tale background. The plot was interesting, the pieces came together nicely, and the characters were interesting.
bookaddictsguide More than 1 year ago
I read SNOW WHITE AND ROSE RED with Alyssa & Amy for our December On the Same Page read (it’s one of Alyssa’s favorites) and after not liking Amy’s favorite, I was terrified. I got a couple pages into the book and was like, “Holy cow. That’s a lot of thee & thou & thy.” But as I read on, it really wasn’t as daunting as it first seemed. I’m not used to the language so yes, it did affect my read a little bit because I had to concentrate more, but overall, the book was very enjoyable! SNOW WHITE AND ROSE RED is actually one fairy tale I remember reading as a kid (at least I THINK I read the original…) and it stuck out in my mind. I really enjoyed Patricia C. Wrede’s adaptation and how she changed the tale in little ways to make it her own story and these changes actually really helped me grow attached to the book too. I’m notoriously hesitant about fairy books but after falling in love with books like Heir of Fire and A Court of Thorns and Roses, I’m definitely coming around so I was so happy to see that not only was it something that I wasn’t afraid of in SWRR but also something that I enjoyed. I loved the characters and they totally made the book for me. They were SO much fun with so much personality. I’m glad I was pushed to read this one with Alyssa & Amy because I would not have done it without them!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I was disappointed in this read. For a fairy tale with witches and magicians, it felt like a magicless read. The author's choice to write in an Elizabethan manner made it difficult to fully immerse myself or connect to the characters. I had to spend too much time using context clues to figure out what the characters were saying. I couldn't love the villains or the good guys.
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slimikin More than 1 year ago
I'm not someone who really likes or feels the need to reread books, but Snow White and Rose Red is definitely an exception. There's so much to enjoy in Patricia C. Wrede's retelling of the fairy tale: the relationship between brothers and between sisters; the day-to-day details of Elizabethan England; Faerie lands with haughty, disdainful faerie folk; plots interwoven within plots; romance; a cameo by Robin Goodfellow, aka, Puck; historical figures turned villains; and bears. Well, *a* bear, anyway. But when that bear is a half-human, half-faerie man ensorcelled into the shape of a bear, one is all you really need. Every reread is a rediscovery of all that I love about the book, and for days afterward I'm known to long for a bear to appear on my doorstep.