"Slowly, Slowly, Slowly," Said the Sloth

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Overview

Slowly, slowly, slowly . . . that's the way the sloth moves. Slowly, it eats and then, slowly, it falls asleep. "What strange kind of creature is this?" the other animals wonder. Why doesn't it run or fly or play or hunt like the rest of us? "Why are you so slow?" the howler monkey inquires. But the sloth doesn't answer any questions until the jaguar asks, "Why are you so lazy?"

Anyone who has ever felt too busy will appreciate the sloth's peaceful lifestyle and realize that it's okay to take time to enjoy life. Eric Carle' s dazzling collage illustrations introduce readers to the exotic beauty of the Amazon rain forest and the many unusual animals living there.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780142408476
Publisher: Penguin Young Readers Group
Publication date: 05/10/2007
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 32
Sales rank: 57,686
Product dimensions: 9.06(w) x 12.25(h) x 0.13(d)
Age Range: 3 - 7 Years

About the Author

Eric Carle is acclaimed and beloved as the creator of brilliantly illustrated and innovatively designed picture books for very young children. His best-known work, The Very Hungry Caterpillar, has eaten its way into the hearts of literally millions of children all over the world and has been translated into more than 25 languages and sold over twelve million copies. Since the Caterpillar was published in 1969, Eric Carle has illustrated more than sixty books, many best sellers, most of which he also wrote.

Born in Syracuse, New York, in 1929, Eric Carle moved with his parents to Germany when he was six years old; he was educated there, and graduated from the prestigious art school, the Akademie der bildenden Kunste, in Stuttgart. But his dream was always to return to America, the land of his happiest childhood memories. So, in 1952, with a fine portfolio in hand and forty dollars in his pocket, he arrived in New York. Soon he found a job as a graphic designer in the promotion department of The New York Times. Later, he was the art director of an advertising agency for many years.

One day, respected educator and author, Bill Martin Jr, called to ask Carle to illustrate a story he had written. Martin's eye had been caught by a striking picture of a red lobster that Carle had created for an advertisement. Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See? was the result of their collaboration. It is still a favorite with children everywhere. This was the beginning of Eric Carle's true career. Soon Carle was writing his own stories, too. His first wholly original book was 1,2,3 to the Zoo, followed soon afterward by the celebrated classic, The Very Hungry Caterpillar.

Eric Carle's art is distinctive and instantly recognizable. His art work is created in collage technique, using hand-painted papers, which he cuts and layers to form bright and cheerful images. Many of his books have an added dimension - die-cut pages, twinkling lights as in The Very Lonely Firefly, even the lifelike sound of a cricket's song as in The Very Quiet Cricket - giving them a playful quality: a toy that can be read, a book that can be touched. Children also enjoy working in collage and many send him pictures they have made themselves, inspired by his illustrations. He receives hundreds of letters each week from his young admirers. The secret of Eric Carle's books' appeal lies in his intuitive understanding of and respect for children, who sense in him instinctively someone who shares their most cherished thoughts and emotions.

The themes of his stories are usually drawn from his extensive knowledge and love of nature - an interest shared by most small children. Besides being beautiful and entertaining, his books always offer the child the opportunity to learn something about the world around them. It is his concern for children, for their feelings and their inquisitiveness, for their creativity and their intellectual growth that, in addition to his beautiful artwork, makes the reading of his books such a stimulating and lasting experience.

Carle says: "With many of my books I attempt to bridge the gap between the home and school. To me home represents, or should represent; warmth, security, toys, holding hands, being held. School is a strange and new place for a child. Will it be a happy place? There are new people, a teacher, classmates - will they be friendly? I believe the passage from home to school is the second biggest trauma of childhood; the first is, of course, being born. Indeed, in both cases we leave a place of warmth and protection for one that is unknown. The unknown often brings fear with it. In my books I try to counteract this fear, to replace it with a positive message. I believe that children are naturally creative and eager to learn. I want to show them that learning is really both fascinating and fun."

Eric Carle has two grown-up children, a son and a daughter. With his wife Barbara, he lives in Northampton, Massachusetts. The Carles spend their summers in the nearby Berkshire hills.

copyright © 2000 by Penguin Group (USA) Books for Young Readers. All rights reserved.
Eric Carle is acclaimed and beloved as the creator of brilliantly illustrated and innovatively designed picture books for very young children. His best-known work, The Very Hungry Caterpillar, has eaten its way into the hearts of literally millions of children all over the world and has been translated into more than 25 languages and sold over twelve million copies. Since the Caterpillar was published in 1969, Eric Carle has illustrated more than sixty books, many best sellers, most of which he also wrote.

Born in Syracuse, New York, in 1929, Eric Carle moved with his parents to Germany when he was six years old; he was educated there, and graduated from the prestigious art school, the Akademie der bildenden Kunste, in Stuttgart. But his dream was always to return to America, the land of his happiest childhood memories. So, in 1952, with a fine portfolio in hand and forty dollars in his pocket, he arrived in New York. Soon he found a job as a graphic designer in the promotion department of The New York Times. Later, he was the art director of an advertising agency for many years.

One day, respected educator and author, Bill Martin Jr, called to ask Carle to illustrate a story he had written. Martin's eye had been caught by a striking picture of a red lobster that Carle had created for an advertisement. Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See? was the result of their collaboration. It is still a favorite with children everywhere. This was the beginning of Eric Carle's true career. Soon Carle was writing his own stories, too. His first wholly original book was 1,2,3 to the Zoo, followed soon afterward by the celebrated classic, The Very Hungry Caterpillar.

Eric Carle's art is distinctive and instantly recognizable. His art work is created in collage technique, using hand-painted papers, which he cuts and layers to form bright and cheerful images. Many of his books have an added dimension - die-cut pages, twinkling lights as in The Very Lonely Firefly, even the lifelike sound of a cricket's song as in The Very Quiet Cricket - giving them a playful quality: a toy that can be read, a book that can be touched. Children also enjoy working in collage and many send him pictures they have made themselves, inspired by his illustrations. He receives hundreds of letters each week from his young admirers. The secret of Eric Carle's books' appeal lies in his intuitive understanding of and respect for children, who sense in him instinctively someone who shares their most cherished thoughts and emotions.

The themes of his stories are usually drawn from his extensive knowledge and love of nature - an interest shared by most small children. Besides being beautiful and entertaining, his books always offer the child the opportunity to learn something about the world around them. It is his concern for children, for their feelings and their inquisitiveness, for their creativity and their intellectual growth that, in addition to his beautiful artwork, makes the reading of his books such a stimulating and lasting experience.

Carle says: "With many of my books I attempt to bridge the gap between the home and school. To me home represents, or should represent; warmth, security, toys, holding hands, being held. School is a strange and new place for a child. Will it be a happy place? There are new people, a teacher, classmates - will they be friendly? I believe the passage from home to school is the second biggest trauma of childhood; the first is, of course, being born. Indeed, in both cases we leave a place of warmth and protection for one that is unknown. The unknown often brings fear with it. In my books I try to counteract this fear, to replace it with a positive message. I believe that children are naturally creative and eager to learn. I want to show them that learning is really both fascinating and fun."

Eric Carle has two grown-up children, a son and a daughter. With his wife Barbara, he lives in Northampton, Massachusetts. The Carles spend their summers in the nearby Berkshire hills.

copyright © 2000 by Penguin Group (USA) Books for Young Readers. All rights reserved.

Hometown:

Northampton, Massachusetts and the Berkshires

Date of Birth:

June 25, 1929

Place of Birth:

Syracuse, New York

Education:

Akademie der bildenden Künste, Stuttgart, 1946-50

Customer Reviews

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''Slowly, Slowly, Slowly,'' Said The Sloth (Turtleback School & Library Binding Edition) 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 12 reviews.
lmbenji on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This story tells of a sloth who moves very slowly and the surrounding animals in the rainforest ask why he moves so slow and seems so lazy. The sloth replies simply by saying, he likes what he does and the way in which he does it. It teaches a good lesson that it is okay to be different. I also liked how there is an index of all the animals mentioned in the back of the book. It adds another great visual!
nlevanen09 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is a good example of fantasy because all of the animal characters in the book talk. Every animal that walks by the sloth asks him about why he is so lazy and slow and eventually the sloth tells all of the animals that he is just the way he is. Stars for ThemeAge: Primary and Intermediate
Jingjing on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is a good book of modern fantasy because animals in this story actually can talk, and they have human characteristics. Age: PrimaryMedia: oil pens, collageSetting: In the jungle
princessofthesea on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Subject Area: Language ArtsGenre: FantasyThis book falls into the fantasy genre because Eric Carle makes all of his animal characters talk. The book contains a lot of factual information, such as the names and characteristics of rain forest animals. However, because the facts are not distinguishable from the story, this book cannot classify as informational. (Stars for characterization.)Age: Primary
whitneyw on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This book does a great job of giving the sloth human characteristics and opinons. He defends the way he lives slowely, slowely, slowely. I really liked reading this book because I can pitcure a classroom of children reading this aloud and having fun with the wording and repition of this book.There is great repitious alliteration for classroom grammer lessons. There is also a paragraph full of silly world on the last page of the book, which adds an element of suprise.There are great looking visuals in this book because the graphics are water colors and looked texured, they really make the book's illustrations look unique and enjoyable for a elementary school child to read.
emwaymire on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
"Slowly, Slowly, Slowly" said the Sloth describes the life of a sloth living in the Amazon rainforest. All the other rainforest animals begin to inquire why the sloth is always so lazy, slow, and boring, but finally the sloth speaks up for himself one day and explains all the synonyms for slow and that he is not lazy, he just enjoys the peace and his own way of living life. This is a great story to go along with a rainforest unit, as it explores many of the common animals in the rainforest. The story also gives the children a great opportunity to expand their vocabulary using words such as "lackadaisical."--a fabulous story for inquisitive young children!Visit Eric Carle's website for more information on this story and other books by him.
cmiersma on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This book relates to a sloth who is extremely slow at everything. The other jungle animals ask him why he is slow slow, and boring, and lazy. The sloth thinks for a while and decides that he is not lazy, his slowness is just the way he is. Fantasy is a exposed in this book when the animals show that they are able to talk. Everything that happens and all the animals in the book can appear on Earth, but the questions and comments the animals ask are not realistic for our world.A teacher could use this book to teach students about sloths and the kinds of things they do and eat in real life. The class could look at some real pictures of a sloth. Maybe if a local zoo has a sloth, the class could take a trip to see it and some of the other jungle animals that are illustrated in this book. Media: CollageThe setting in this story takes place in a jungle, particularly on a tree. This is important because of the slowness of the sloth, the tree is the only place the sloth goes. This really shows the slowness of a sloth and how many people or animals might thinks the sloth is just plain lazy.
ampitcher on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
i thought this book would be cool to point out that theres things about our selves we cant change or theres qualities that are "me" like the slowness of the sloth is who the sloth is.
13meadows More than 1 year ago
This book sparked many question from my 3 year old. He wanted to know my the sloth moved so slow and what wrong with doing things fast. very interesting book with different points to discover.
aangelicaa070707 More than 1 year ago
Great Book! Not only are Eric Carles illustrations fantastic, the the story is so sweet. I love reading this to our 2 year old because it shows him that moving slowly can be relaxing and tranquil! ;) I know he just loves the pictures of all the animals and he especially laughs at all the word that Eric Carle uses for lazy. The story behind this is awesome! Just because you move slowly, doesn't mean your lazy! Too Fun!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
Relaxing sweet book of the sloths life and how he takes it very slowly. Great bedtime story. Calming and reassuring to little ones.