Shakespeare's Sonnets (Barnes & Noble Collectible Editions)

Shakespeare's Sonnets (Barnes & Noble Collectible Editions)

by William Shakespeare

Paperback(Bonded Leather)

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Overview


William Shakespeare wrote some of the greatest poetry in all world literature, in compact sonnets bursting with beautiful imagery and timeless insights about love, life, and human nature. This elegantly designed pocket edition features all 154 of the Immortal Bard’s exquisite sonnets.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781435169357
Publisher: Fall River Press
Publication date: 05/31/2019
Series: Barnes & Noble Collectible Editions Series
Edition description: Bonded Leather
Pages: 128
Sales rank: 36,250
Product dimensions: 4.20(w) x 7.00(h) x 0.50(d)

About the Author

Widely esteemed as the greatest writer in the English language, William Shakespeare (1564-1616) was an actor and theatrical producer in addition to writing plays and sonnets. Dubbed "The Bard of Avon," Shakespeare oversaw the building of the Globe Theatre in London, where a number of his plays were staged, the best-known of which include Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet, and Macbeth. The First Folio, a printed book of 36 of his comedies, tragedies, and history plays, was published in 1623.

Date of Death:

2018

Place of Birth:

Stratford-upon-Avon, United Kingdom

Place of Death:

Stratford-upon-Avon, United Kingdom

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Shakespeare's Sonnets 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 23 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Shakespeare's magnificent sonnets represent the most sublime expressions of love ever set down in the English language. In the England of Shakespeare's day, sonnets were thought to be extraordinarily personal expressions of love and devotion and were usually only given to one's close friends and those whom one loved. Sonnets were not really written to be published and it is generally thought that Shakespeare did not prepare these sonnets for publication. Most of these sonnets, written between 1594 and 1597, are addressed to, or mention, a fair boy or a dark lady. Shakespeare never mentioned the name of the persons to whom the sonnets were addressed and so there has been much speculation as to their identity but no clear-cut answers. When studying the sonnets, it is impossible to single one out without reference to another. The full meaning of the sonnets really only becomes clear once they are considered together, as a whole. A sonnet with a certain meaning may be immediately followed by one that conveys just the opposite. The sonnets thus build on, cancel out and are formed by each other. Their meanings are entirely relative to what comes before and what goes after. The first 126 sonnets are clearly addressed to a young man, whom Shakespeare called 'beauty's rose.' It is clear that Shakespeare's love for this young boy is only platonic; in fact, in the first 27 sonnets he strongly urges the boy to get married and have children. Betrayal is the theme of the following 100 sonnets, as Shakespeare acknowledges the affairs of both the young boy and his mistress, mourns his absence and finally forgives the boy all of his various infidelities. The remaining sonnets talk of the dark lady and most people have presumed this to have been Shakespeare's own mistress. The sonnets describe a painful, but extremely loving and private, relationship. The word 'time,' is mentioned and discussed more than 80 times in the sonnets, often being personified and used as though it were a name. Shakespeare tells the young boy that time is causing him (Shakespeare) to grow old and to draw hideously close to death. Then he goes on to say that time, too, will eventually rob the young man of both his beauty and his youth. In fact, throughout the sonnets, Shakespeare presents time as both a protagonist and an aggressor. Many of the sonnets encourage the young boy to marry and have children as a way of combating the evils of time. When it becomes clear, however, that the boy is opposed to marriage, Shakespeare then encourages him to turn to the composition of poetry as a way of overcoming the tyranny of time. Sonnet 116 discusses the final opponent of time and the thing most effective in conquering it--Love. The foundation for this theme of love was built up gradually in several of the earlier sonnets in which Shakespeare comes to the conclusion that only love can shelter us from the ravages of both time and death. The conclusion he draws in Sonnet 116 is that love, despite time, is a constant. Once you are familiar with these gorgeous sonnets you will be able to read and understand them out of context. And, just because many of them were written for a young boy does not mean they are not love poetry of the highest order. Shakespeare stands alone, of course. These are the most sublime expressions of love ever recorded in the English language. Don't miss them.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I thought i loved william now but after his sonnets...im speechless
GailCooke More than 1 year ago
Tongue tied when it comes to telling someone how much you care? Send this audio book to that special person. You'll not only be thought romantic but erudite as well. After all, even at your best you probably couldn't come up with 'Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate: Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And summer's lease hath all too short a date.' These love poems have been extolled for over 400 years, quoted, misquoted, and copied. Written between 1593 - 1601, to a great degree the 154 sonnets reveal the Bard's thoughts on the perplexities of life - love, honor, rebirth. Perhaps most important to many we also find his attraction to the 'Dark Lady.' Is there a reference in Sonnet 151 with 'Love is too young to know what conscience is....'? All the world loves a mystery which may be why we're so fascinated by the Dark Lady. Her identity is unknown, it is not even known whether she was a real woman with whom Shakespeare had a relationship or a manifestation of his creativity. Some surmise that she was so called because her hair was black and her skin dusk colored, thus she was Spanish. Others posit that 'dark' did not refer to her appearance but rather to the black or dark feelings of desire. This discussion may go on indefinitely. Unfortunately, British actor Simon Callow's brilliant reading of the sonnets only lasts two hours. However, the replay button is at the ready. 'Shakespeare's Sonnets' is a keeper to be enjoyed over and over again. - Gail Cooke
Guest More than 1 year ago
The sonnets are inspiring and packed full of wisdom. I carry this book everywhere!!!
LCoale1 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
As someone who really grapples with understanding Shakespeare, I found his sonnets easier to comprehend than the works I'd previously read without the guidance of a goddess English teacher (so, Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, and The Tempest). I was also reminded of the Twilight saga with every sonnet that I could comprehend (probably 78% of them; bed-time reading was a bad idea). I'm not sure if that's good or bad.
lyzadanger on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
My biggest piece of advice to first-time readers (like I just was): take your time. Maybe not as much time as I took, if you don't want--I read two or three sonnets at a sitting, so it took me months to finish the entire collection. I was able to discover my own favorite sonnet, which isn't one of the standard favorites (#44). I do like the Folgers series of Shakespeare (I like the notes on the facing page), but I also consulted other references (mostly online) as I read.
porian on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Shakespeare is smooth! I'm going to have to use some of those lines on my next victim, ahem, girlfriend. What girl won't fall for lines like, "And in some perfumes is there more delight/ than in the breath that from my mistress reeks." Come on. You can't beat that.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The sample is good imma get the book soon
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
lisanay More than 1 year ago
This is wonderful read for the nook!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It's simply amazing and perfect to read when you desire something interesting, intruging, and plain beautiful. It's a must-have for all collections. And I'm only 16 years old!!!
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