Saint Maybe

Saint Maybe

by Anne Tyler

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Overview

New York Times Bestseller

“Captivating. . . . Compelling. . . . There is a kind of magic at work in this novel.” —The Washington Post Book World

Ian Bedloe is the ideal teenage son, leading a cheery, apple-pie life with his family in Baltimore. That is, until a careless and vicious rumor leads to a devastating tragedy. Imploding from guilt, Ian believes he is the one responsible for the tragedy. No longer a star athlete with a bright future, and desperately searching for salvation, he stumbles across a storefront with a neon sign that simply reads: CHURCH OF THE SECOND CHANCE.

Ian has always viewed his penance as a burden. But through the power of faith and the love of family, he begins to view it as a gift. After years spent trying to atone for his foolish mistakes, Ian finds forgiveness and peace in the life he builds for himself.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780307784568
Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date: 01/26/2011
Sold by: Random House
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 352
Sales rank: 112,456
File size: 908 KB

About the Author

ANNE TYLER is the author of more than twenty novels. Her eleventh novel, Breathing Lessons, was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1988. She is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters. She lives in Baltimore, Maryland.

Hometown:

Baltimore, Maryland

Date of Birth:

October 25, 1941

Place of Birth:

Minneapolis, Minnesota

Education:

B.A., Duke University, 1961

Customer Reviews

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Saint Maybe 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 26 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Anne Tyler's novel Saint Maybe was very well written. It is one of those books that I just couldn't put down and that any reader could almost always learn something from. I thought the most effective part of the story was Tyler's use of her character Ian, whom she follows through each step in his life and shows exactly how the tragedies in his life changed his outlook. Tyler made him do soul searching, and at the end of the book after showing him working through his problems, she shows his growth and the product of his effort to forgive himself for the tragedies that he endured. The children in this story were also a key part of the story, I liked them, because I felt like they were written with a lot of realistic traits. Unlike a lot of books Tyler seemed to give these children respect even though they weren't quite adults. She treated them like equals on the same level as the other characters in the novel. I also was able to relate to the beginning of the story because of the way Tyler created the picture of an apple pie All-American family. I was really drawn into Saint Maybe because all the elements of a great book were there: an interesting plot, multi dimensional characters, and an easy to relate to theme.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I am a high schooler were this book was given as an assignment and I go without saying this is the best book i have read in a long time. It reads so well mixing humor and life together. It tells of a real story that can happen to anyone and of the obstacles we all face at some point in our life. If you want to read a true life book you have to read this one.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is an extraordianary book! Anne Tyler is a great writer and I highly recommed it to other readers and other fans of this author.
lycomayflower on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
An enjoyable read, as Tyler has a gift for putting the details and events of ordinary life on the page. The writing is clean and well-turned, and Tyler's choice of jumping a bit forward in time and into a new point of view for each chapter makes the novel as a whole work well as portrait of the Bedloe family over time. If I have any complaints, it is that this method of story-telling makes the reader feel as if she never really has a handle on any of the characters, for every time they appear, they've turned into a slightly different version of themselves. That Tyler can achieve that effect speaks to her skill, but it also left me feeling a bit unsatisfied with the book.
readingrat on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This book is typical Anne Tyler - full of wonderfully realistic characters and themes that keep you thinking.
booksinthebelfry on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is my second favorite of all Anne Tyler's novels, surpassed only by Dinner at the Homesick Restaurant -- which has mysteriously disappeared from my bookshelves, possibly lost in a move somewhere along the way, or recklessly lent to someone & never returned.... If you see it, please send it home! :-)
co_coyote on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I read this years ago, and pretty much forgot it, remarkably enough. I picked it off my self to take with me on a backpacking trip over the July 4th weekend. The weather report indicated I might well be spending more time in my tent than I wanted to. Believe me, there is nothing better than an Anne Tyler novel to take your mind off inclement weather and the cold, hard ground. A total delight, as always.
CatieN on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
It is 1960's America, and the Bedloes are the all-American family living in Baltimore with three kids: Claudia, Danny, and Ian. Ian is 17, a popular senior in high school with a pretty girlfriend, raging hormones, a bit of an attitude, and a touch of laziness thrown in for good measure. One night, Ian lets his temper and poor judgment act on his behalf and believes he is the cause of the tragedy that ensues. Wonderful book about the repercussions there are from words that are spoken carelessly, never to be taken back, and also forgiveness, especially of yourself. Beautifully written with characters, all of them, that the reader truly cares about. Was sad to see it end.
whirled on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
All of us have done it - tossed a particularly cruel barb at somebody we profess to love in a moment of frustration and anger - yet few have paid as dearly for such fleeting indiscretions as Ian Bedloe. The aftermath of that moment has a profound effect on Ian, prompting him to swap college life for surrogate parenthood and a rather cult-like brand of religion. Once again, Anne Tyler skillfully intertwines humour and pathos to bring this unpredictable tale of regret and forgiveness to life.
nocto on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I don't want to say much about the plot here as I read it without having a clue and not knowing where it was going was good. Roughly, it's 25ish years in the life of a Baltimore family. It's ten perfect chapters - each could stand alone as a short story but they build up to a fantastic whole novel. Bite them off one at a time and savour them.
writestuff on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I'm almost ashamed to admit this is the first Anne Tyler book I have read...and it has made me a fan of her writing. Ms. Tyler seems to have a gift for weaving laugh out loud humor into devastatingly sad and touching scenes. I found myself unable to put the book down as I traveled through Ian's life with him and his motley family of very real people. In the end, the book seemed to be about how one moves through life, clinging to faith, searching for meaning and uncovering the simple truths that make us all human. Definitely a book I can recommend.
Clueless on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This may very well be my most favorite book ever. The characters are just like the people I know in real life. Not all goofy wishy/washy like some other novels. And they act just like real people. Meaning they don't pull guns on each other or do anything else fantastical.Can I give a book 10 stars?
Black_samvara on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Strangely compelling; Ian makes a poorly timed comment on the faithfulness of his older brother's wife and manages to jynx the next 20 years of his life. He tries to expiate his guilt by dropping school, adopting a new religion and taking on his brother's three orphaned children, none of whom he believes are really related to him.
Octlow More than 1 year ago
Saint Maybe; The author is Anne Tyler and she is a little quirky, not wrong but somewhat different. Her writing here reflects an extremely bright mind with the ability to take a simple premise and develop a story with depth and character. The story opens with Ian Bledsoe, a 19 year old boy who is about ready to start college, Ian’s brother Danny who is going to get married soon to women he just met, a mother who believes everything is just wonderful, and a father who is more utilitarian than accepted as a part of the family. The writer then takes us thru the next 25 years of this family’s life and the sorrow of one man, Ian, lives in. The book develops how people change our lives, some for the better, some with pain, but very little personal joy is conveyed to one another.
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jlmMN More than 1 year ago
IMHO I wouldn't spend the money to purchase this book. Even if I start a book I'll finish it hopeing it will get better. In this case it didn't
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Guest More than 1 year ago
Everyone should read this book at least once in their lifetime!!! Its amazing!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I think this book is absolutely amazing. The way Anne Tyler writes is ingeneous. She touched me with her book, and at some points I even cried. There are no words to explain what I felt while reading this.....Great work Anne!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is such a beautiful book, and is one of my all time favorite of Tylers' work. It is written in that same Tylers' style (funny, witty, and down to earth), and I think (this novel) has more heart than her others.