The Pull of the Moon

The Pull of the Moon

by Elizabeth Berg

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Overview

In the middle of her life, Nan decides to leave her husband at home and begin an impromptu trek across the country, carrying with her a turquoise leather journal she intends to fill. The Pull of the Moon is a novel about a woman coming to terms with issues of importance to all women. In her journal, Nan addresses the thorniness—and the allure—of marriage, the sweet ties to children, and the gifts and lessons that come from random encounters with strangers, including a handsome man appearing out of the woods and a lonely housewife sitting on her front porch steps. Most of all, Nan writes about the need for the self to stay alive. In this luminous and exquisitely written novel, Elizabeth Berg shows how sometimes you have to leave your life behind in order to find it.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780345512178
Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
Publication date: 03/23/2010
Pages: 240
Sales rank: 386,418
Product dimensions: 5.10(w) x 7.90(h) x 0.70(d)

About the Author

Elizabeth Berg is the author of many bestselling novels, including The Story of Arthur Truluv, Open House (an Oprah’s Book Club selection), Talk Before Sleep, and The Year of Pleasures, as well as the short story collection The Day I Ate Whatever I WantedDurable Goods and Joy School were selected as ALA Best Books of the Year. She adapted The Pull of the Moon into a play that enjoyed sold-out performances in Chicago and Indianapolis. Berg’s work has been published in thirty countries, and three of her novels have been turned into television movies. She is the founder of Writing Matters, a quality reading series dedicated to serving author, audience, and community. She teaches one-day writing workshops and is a popular speaker at venues around the country. Some of her most popular Facebook postings have been collected in Make Someone Happy and Still Happy. She lives outside Chicago.

Hometown:

Chicago, Illinois

Date of Birth:

December 2, 1948

Place of Birth:

St. Paul, Minnesota

Education:

Attended the University of Minnesota; St. Mary¿s College, A.A.S.

Read an Excerpt

Dear Martin,
(Continues…)



Excerpted from "The Pull of the Moon"
by .
Copyright © 2010 Elizabeth Berg.
Excerpted by permission of Random House Publishing Group.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Pull of the Moon 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 54 reviews.
nfmgirl More than 1 year ago
In Pull of the Moon, you follow along with Nan on both her physical and emotional journeys, shared with you through her diary entries and letters to her loved ones. Nan is fifty, married with a grown daughter, and she has reached that point that I think many women reach at some point. She has spent her life as a wife and a mother, and has forgotten who SHE is, and now is consumed by the additional fear of losing her youth and desirability as she faces the physical changes of menopause. So she packs up, hops in the car, and just leaves her husband with a note of apology. She travels around the country, getting to know herself again, remembering who she is and what she likes and what she wants, while writing in her diary and writing letters to her husband to share with him the discoveries that she is making along the way. I'll just say it. I LOVED this book, even though I found myself not really identifying with this place where Nan had found herself: feeling lost, depressed and on the verge of losing her mind along with her identity. However I could still identify with HER. She is every woman, on the basest of levels. And I love the way that author Elizabeth Berg causes me to turn the mirror on myself with a little "Aha!" I like Nan. I like how she reminds me of things that I haven't thought of for a long time. I love the clear and descriptive visual analogies of statements like "Today I woke up and felt the old pull of sadness back. It's like a robe that is too heavy, weighing down my shoulders, dragging up dirt as it follows along behind me." This is one of my favorite lines from the book. Even though I am divorced with no children, and am at a very different place in my life, there is a part of me that could identify with Nan. I could identify with her when she confessed, "I wanted to be able to tell Ruthie how to be popular, how to make and keep friends. But I was-- and still am-- pretty much a loner, one who wearies of almost anyone's company much too soon...Even when I got older, I'd be sitting with a bunch of college friends and suddenly have to leave...I wanted Ruthie to be different from me, to be someone who could make casual conversation without clenching her fists, who could be comfortable at a party." I think that most women can identify with Nan at some point. There's a little Nan in all of us. Last night I sat in the movie theater, reading my book while we waited for the movie to start , and reached over and whispered in my boyfriend's ear. "You know how I'm always telling you that if I don't have someone to share an experience with, it's as if it never happened? Like 'If a tree falls in the forest and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound?'" He nodded. "In my book she says, 'Occasionally, one learns quiet, and then how to keep it. Even me, who has always felt that everything must be shared, in order for it to be.' See? Nan gets me." And so she does.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Even though I have a ways before I hit the 'age of losses' (or as Nan showed us 'gains'), I fell in love with this book and have read it numerous times (loaned it to my mom as well). It is the essence of every woman. I think that only another woman could read this and think 'yes! this is exactly how my mind works.' You are there with Nan every page, finding your own self, and remembering life. A must-read!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
My sister, of whom I have a nice but not terribly deep relationship with, sent me this book many years ago out of the blue. I read it, loved it, put it in my bookshelf. Started reading Berg with Talk Before Sleep and of course everything else she has written since. I revisited Pull of the Moon recently and found a whole new book in it. I now understand why my sister sent me that book when she did...
Guest More than 1 year ago
I Loved this book and thought about my mother as well, when she was going through that period in her life... It really made me think about getting old, that we all have to go through it. I wished though that I would have known how the husband reacted to her when she arrived home! I was so curious!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I would recomed this book to any one over 40 who is trying to find there interself again. Brings you back to reality makes you want to enjoy the real things in life that are free like just listening to the birds sing or listening to the waves at the beach, just listening to just plan old chit chat about nothing making you look at your own life and what are you really doing to enjoy it an making the best of your own life. Stop rushing through everything stop and smell the roses. I love this book, and will pass it on to someone else just like it was passed on to me.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I thought Elizabeth Berg had read my mind while writing this book. I have read this book four times and enjoyed it everytime. I have given all my female freinds and relatives a copy of this book. I have enjoyed all of Elizabeth Berg's books. I bought Never Change - her brand new book and now - two days later- I am 3/4 of the way through it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have read several of Ms. Berg's books and they are all so emotionally charged, they either make you cry or say way to go. This was definitely one of her best. I 'read' it through audio and the narrator was superb. I am only 33, but now I understand what changes can happen to a woman during menopause, both emotionally and physically. I could also see myself as she describes Nan as her daughter was growing up, wanting to be there for everything and yet feeling squeezed. This book lets you know that the going may be rough, but the end of the road can be better than you thought.
nevacampbell on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Nan, her beautiful expensive journal and her little stone go on a journey.
mlake on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is the book that turned me into an Elizabeth Berg fan!
nfmgirl2 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
In Pull of the Moon, you follow along with Nan on both her physical and emotional journeys, shared with you through her diary entries and letters to her loved ones.Nan is fifty, married with a grown daughter, and she has reached that point that I think many women reach at some point. She has spent her life as a wife and a mother, and has forgotten who SHE is, and now is consumed by the additional fear of losing her youth and desirability as she faces the physical changes of menopause. So she packs up, hops in the car, and just leaves her husband with a note of apology. She travels around the country, getting to know herself again, remembering who she is and what she likes and what she wants, while writing in her diary and writing letters to her husband to share with him the discoveries that she is making along the way.I'll just say it. I LOVED this book. I can't truly identify with Nan. I've never lost my identity. Perhaps it's because I've never had children, and I've been divorced for ten years. So I have been able to maintain a better sense of my self. Perhaps it's just because I have a very strong knowledge of "who I am", as I never had any fear of losing myself during my ten years of marriage either.So I found myself not really identifying with this place where Nan had found herself: feeling lost, depressed and on the verge of losing her mind along with her identity. However I could still identify with HER. She is every woman, on the basest of levels. And I love the way that author Elizabeth Berg causes me to turn the mirror on myself with a little "Aha!"I like Nan. I like how she reminds me of things that I haven't thought of for a long time, I like when she makes observations like "...and soon we were all laughing, it was the kind of thing where the laughter feeds on itself, where the sound of someone else's snorting and wheezing keeps you going until you don't even know why you started laughing in the first place-- and you don't care. It's so good for you, that kind of hard laughter, so cleansing-- you feel like your liver's been held up and hosed down, your heart relieved of a million grimy weights." I remember that feeling, although it's been a long time since I felt it. Remember sitting around with your girlfriends, giggling hysterically, and someone would ask what was so funny, and you'd just shake your head and say "I don't know", look at each other, and laugh even harder?I love the clear and descriptive visual analogies of statements like "Today I woke up and felt the old pull of sadness back. It's like a robe that is too heavy, weighing down my shoulders, dragging up dirt as it follows along behind me." This is one of my favorite lines from the book.Even though I am divorced with no children, and am at a very different place in my life, there is a part of me that could identify with Nan. I could identify with her when she confessed, "I wanted to be able to tell Ruthie how to be popular, how to make and keep friends. But I was-- and still am-- pretty much a loner, one who wearies of almost anyone's company much too soon...Even when I got older, I'd be sitting with a bunch of college friends and suddenly have to leave...I wanted Ruthie to be different from me, to be someone who could make casual conversation without clenching her fists, who could be comfortable at a party." I think that most women can identify with Nan at some point. There's a little Nan in all of us.Last night I sat in the movie theater, reading my book while we waited for the movie to start , and reached over and whispered in my boyfriend's ear. "You know how I'm always telling you that if I don't have someone to share an experience with, it's as if it never happened? Like 'If a tree falls in the forest and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound?'" He nodded. "In my book she says, 'Occasionally, one learns quiet, and then how to keep it. Even me, who has always felt that everything must be shared, in order for it to be.' See? Nan gets
Cailin on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed this book a great deal. I thought the writing was very honest and many times I read things I have thought myself. I liked the way the book was all about the one character and how she lost herself in her life.
UnderMyAppleTree on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is the first book I've read by Elizabeth Berg and I was not disappointed. I found the story compelling and was drawn into Nan's journey right away. As a middle age woman I can relate to Nan. And really, haven't most of us thought of just getting in the car and driving away as Nan does? And use that time alone to come to terms with our life and our relationships?
msimelda on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
What is Elizabeth Berg doing writing about my life? I bought the book on a day I felt like getting a nice hotel room and "running away" for the day. I had no idea the book was about a 50 year old woman taking a little break from her own life. I loved this book, and it was so dead on regarding so many emotions and realisms of turning middle aged. Ann Tyler's ladder of years was also good, but a little depressing with the sad wardrobe and sad little room the character takes. I say if you're going to run a way for a little bit - do it in style!
fiadhiglas on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I keep running across Ms. Berg's books at my library, and find myself drawn to them because they are described as witty and lyrical prose. And yet, I can't agree. This was the 3rd book of hers I've read, and like the others, I felt no affinity for the protagonist, and no real interest in her life or journey. I just don't understand the appeal of this writer.
joannemepham29 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I have read a lot of reviews of this book, but honestly self-indulgence aside I thought this was lovely to read. I loved her prose, and her way of illustrating in my mind what she was writing by use of her language throughout the book. I loved this story no matter how unbelievable it was to some critics, and there are people in this world who live their life for their children and husband and lose track of themselves. Brilliant, and my first but not last Berg.
hollysing on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Yes, Nan is wrapped up in herself, but Ms. Berg writes so honestly that I find myself often in her characters. I enjoyed this one - and often feel like just jumping in the car and riding off!
BinnieBee on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Lovely book! If only we all had the time, money and imagination to do this!
lorabear on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Why I chose it...Love Elizabeth Berg. What I thought...Found this book to be hilarioius, laugh out loud funny...had to pass it on as soon as I was done so others could laugh with me....LOVED this book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have loved loved loved many of Elizabeth Bergs books. I love her writing style and beautiful prose and relatable characters. But I could not get into this book. I could not like or relate to the narrator and although i kept trying to keep reading i finally gave up. I felt she was trying to be strong and independent and perhaps make some sigificant life changes but she came off as being selfish and kind of cruel and i just couldnt listen to her wining and self measurement any longer. Perhaps others can relate but for me it was not meant to be. Open House and What we Keep were much much better.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It took a while for me to get used to this writer's style of long, run-on sentences. The book is written in the form of a diary and letters to the character's husband. At times I empathize with the character's reflections on life and self, yet overall she seems too self-absorbed. I believe she is seeking the meaning of life in her aimless road trip, but her overall journey left me feeling more sad than hopeful.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Quick read about women and their struggles.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Similar to Eat Pray Love, but much better.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Started out good, ended up boring