Primary EAL Provision: Getting it Right in a Week

Primary EAL Provision: Getting it Right in a Week

Paperback(First Edition)

$15.00
View All Available Formats & Editions
Usually ships within 6 days

Overview

  • Are you confident in your understanding of the significant challenges that EAL pupils face?
  • Do you have a range of teaching strategies to address their needs?
  • Are your EAL learners making the required progress in their lessons?

This text provides you with tried and tested strategies to help you develop effective pedagogy for learning and progression with a range of different EAL pupils. It includes both immediate measures and handy tips as well as long-term strategies to embed into your teaching. Designed to be read over a week, the book is divided into seven concise chapters that will help you build a rich context with integrated and effective teaching for all your EAL pupils.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781912096893
Publisher: Critical Publishing
Publication date: 06/06/2018
Series: Getting it Right in a Week
Edition description: First Edition
Pages: 66
Product dimensions: 5.10(w) x 7.75(h) x 0.30(d)

About the Author

Kirsty Anderson is a Teaching Fellow in the School of Education at Durham University. She teaches English and Art for Education on the UG programme at Durham University where she is also the departmental coordinator for Erasmus and International opportunities. She worked in Newcastle schools for 14 years as class teacher, literacy consultant and as a deputy head. Kirsty has extensive experience of working with children who have English as an additional language through working in diverse, multicultural schools. She is currently attempting to learn Czech whilst also undertaking a PhD exploring the demands of the teaching profession.

Susan Wallace is Emeritus Professor of Education at Nottingham Trent University where, for many years, part of her role was to support learning on the initial training courses for teachers in the FE sector.  She has researched and published extensively on education, training and management of behaviour, and is a popular keynote speaker at conferences. Her particular interests are in mentoring and the motivation and behaviour of students.

Read an Excerpt

CHAPTER 1

Tools for talking and taking part

Engaging EAL learners from the outset: initial and immediate strategies for support

Day 1 of this book is focused on initial strategies to ensure language learning and high expectations from the outset. You might be nervous about working with learners who are learning English as an additional language (EAL) as you will be teaching these learners in English rather than their mother tongue. You might anticipate a silent period for some learners as they become familiar with the environment. This is certainly possible, but in Day 1 you will find some suggestions to encourage talking and taking part which aim to engage the learners and help you to observe their progress. In relation to developing EAL, continued practice really does make perfect! EAL learners, from those who are new to English to advanced bilingual learners, acquire more proficiency at, and understanding of, English daily. New vocabulary can be shared with home, where it can be practised. Recording devices can be helpful with this. The mother tongue will of course lead conversations at home, but sharing the daily language gains with family and friends can ensure that home involvement is expected, encouraged, valued and indeed essential.

Establishing high expectations as EAL learners move forward in their English language acquisition and understanding will help to ensure that you and your learners recognise that progress is important. Immediate support and encouragement can ensure that the EAL learners are developing language skills without delay; it can help you ensure the learner has meaningful and productive tasks; and, most importantly, it can indicate clearly what the learner already knows.

Today's strategies

* Making the right start – a welcome pack:

1. Navigating the day

2. Survival language

3. Comprehensible cultural contexts

* Time to talk:

4. Practising vocabulary

5. Thinking and talking time

6. Pick up a sticky note

* Opening up questions:

7. Listening

8. Learner-led questioning

9. Enabling options

* Peer support:

10. All about us

11. Language partners

12. Practice partners

Strategy: Making the right start – a welcome pack

With some careful consideration, the initial experiences of an EAL learner can be made much more comfortable with a welcome pack which includes navigation tools, survival language, other vocabulary, links with the home country and a recording device. A pack which includes information on timetables, uniforms if applicable, lunch arrangements and essential equipment would be useful for any new starter but can be helpfully adapted for EAL learners.

1. Navigating the day

A timetable of the school day can be made more readable by including a map; photographs of the entrance to buildings, cloakroom areas and break spaces would ensure this is understood in any language. If a school uniform or any special equipment is needed then you can include pictures of these to further illustrate what is required.

2. Survival language

To make certain the EAL learner, and in particular a new-to-English learner, has a smooth transition, the welcome pack can be made even more specific to their needs. You can include lists of key vocabulary, such as the names of equipment and clothing. You can also include important phrases that will aid the learner; for example: I need help or Where is the bathroom? Making a keyring of this and other survival language with clear pictures will help you communicate immediately with your EAL learners.

3. Comprehensible cultural contexts

This context-related thought process is vital when you plan learning opportunities for EAL learners, especially when teaching more abstract concepts. Your EAL learners will be learning English in their second language. When teaching reading, writing, speaking and listening it is useful to have a context onto which the learners can hang their understanding. You can link reading to the learners' interests to provide a context and ask for writing about their own experiences, for example. As the EAL learner becomes more competent and confident, the high context-based learning can be gradually reduced.

Strategy in action

Every Wednesday new starters are welcomed into Marie's primary school. She decided to make sure she was always prepared with her ready supply of personalised welcome packs. For the Year 2 learners in her class, Marie includes name labels for the new starters' coats and storage as well as the information provided by the administration team. Keeping high expectations in mind, she includes a picture book as well as a reading book in each welcome pack. To ensure the EAL learner is made to feel especially welcome and then hopefully settles in more quickly, Marie finds out a little about the home country of the new starter. She includes key vocabulary in the mother tongue, and looks for a cultural reference for the country. Marie includes an aspect of popular culture from the home country in order to ensure that the new starter recognises that their new class is interested in increasing an understanding of different countries in order to firmly develop a global perspective.

On one particular Wednesday, Maros, from the Czech Republic, was starting in her class at age seven. Marie looked at Czech TV children's programmes and discovered Krtek – a little mole. Krtek is widely known and very popular in the Czech Republic. She downloaded an image and made a bookmark for Maros. Maros and his family were understandably anxious about his start, especially as he did not attend formal schooling in the Czech Republic which starts when children are aged seven. They were thrilled to see the popular culture reference included in his pack. The family talked about Krtek animatedly and through observing their facial expressions and gestures Marie felt confident that Maros would feel a little less anxiety about the new start. Others in the class also showed interest, making sure Maros' home country became a talking point – showing that Marie and her learners respect and value each other and the wider world.

Strategy: Time to talk

Writing is one of the main ways of assessing independent understanding in education but this is closely linked to speech and language. Encouraging EAL learners to engage in opportunities to talk can increase confidence and help to develop English vocabularies that can be applied to developing writing skills, which will be explored on Day 2 of this book. Moreover, through encouraging talk about the learners' developing reading and writing skills you can assess knowledge and understanding more quickly than you might if you are focused on reading and writing skills alone.

4. Practising vocabulary

Vocabulary sets can be produced around various themes. New-to-English learners can be taught high frequency words (which can be found in Letters & Sounds [2007], available in many staff rooms as well as online) and lists can be taken home for more practice. You can introduce new sets when the learner demonstrates their recognition of the vocabulary through blending sounds and sight reading. Sets of vocabulary can also be linked to topics or themes. Organising vocabulary sets into different word classes, for instance: nouns, verbs, adjectives, prepositions, can be particularly helpful for the EAL learner if it is common for their mother tongue or home language to be taught this way.

5. Thinking and talking time

When you ask questions or open a discussion, give ample time for thinking, and facilitate this with useful vocabulary and sentence prompts as well as talking through thoughts. Your EAL learners need to process their understanding in both English and their mother tongue and then aim to explain their thoughts in English. To ensure all learners have the time to respond to you, you might use an egg-timer as part of your regular practice. You might expect more detailed or complicated responses from a native English speaker or an advanced bilingual learner. New-to-English learners' responses may be less complex but giving time for thinking will help their internal dialogue and gives you time to appreciate the processes involved in dual language learning.

6. Pick up a sticky note

When opportunities for talk are offered in your lessons, it is useful to listen to the language utilised by the learners. Using sticky notes you can quickly jot down any English words or phrases which are used by the EAL learners. You might even enlist other learners to make notes of these, and eventually encourage the EAL learner to note the words they have used from their own vocabulary list. If you observe and listen to the new-to-English learner as they work with others you will quickly find out what language they already have, and with more advanced EAL learners you can listen for specific aspects of English which might be proving difficult, such as subject – verb agreement or past tense formation.

Strategy in action

* Look at the notes made by this teacher in observations of some learners working as a group to classify art works during a Year 4 art lesson. Consider what the teacher can assess about the two EAL learners' language skills.

Shelina is a confident English speaker. She does need some support and would benefit from regular 'pre-teaching' (perhaps through homework) of key vocabulary.

Marianka has some understanding of the conventions of speaking and listening such as eye contact. She relies on pictorial clues to help her speech so would benefit from ensuring her learning tasks are context based.

Strategy: Opening up questions

You will recognise and value the difference between closed and open questions from your experiences as a teacher. When you work with EAL learners, it can be useful to reconsider your idea of open questioning to include using different tasks as a way to question learners to assess knowledge and understanding. Sometimes using questions and tasks focused on knowledge of language can support you to recognise what your EAL learners understand and what the next steps might be.

7. Listening

A different type of question to ask of your EAL learners involves asking them to listen. Discriminating different words from each other in a second language is challenging and should be carefully developed. In particular, new-to-English EAL learners benefit from being asked to listen carefully for vocabulary they have been learning. You might supply the learner with a checklist or table of language which you know has already been learned and ask the learner to tick off the words they hear. You can extend this by asking the EAL learner to try to write any other words they hear.

8. Learner-led questioning

After they have listened to the teacher, other adult or peer, you can encourage an EAL learner to ask what language was used. This can be directly linked to the English skills being developed in the individual and you can select when you might do this. Support the EAL learner with a checklist, for example of different word classes or different types of sentence. This would be useful to direct more advanced EAL learners. After listening, your EAL learner could be given the chance to ask about the language they heard: Was it a noun? Did you use a command? Was that a dialect word?

9. Enabling options

When you ask open questions, you are allowing all learners the opportunity to share and extend their thinking. Your EAL learners may need some extra scaffolding to facilitate this as they concentrate on ensuring they have the English vocabulary to match their ideas. Using talk time is one way to enable open answers, and you can also provide helpful tables and pictures which they might choose from when sharing their ideas. This added context can reduce the pressure to recall and develop English while also challenging the EAL learners to think about different ideas.

Strategy in action

To develop language alongside learning in other subjects, you might ask your EAL learner to keep a record of the English words they hear during shared teaching times. This is especially effective when teaching subjects which can be clearly supported with matching visuals on a word mat. Teaching more abstract concepts will be explored later in this book.

Your EAL learner is asked to mark on the table anything they hear as you, another adult or a peer is talking with them. The example table below could be used during a Key Stage 2 science lesson.

You can use this in a range of subject areas and might differentiate it through the addition of picture clues for new-to-English learners, and through the use of dual language vocabulary cards. You can offer challenge for more advanced EAL learners through the use of complete sentences or challenging vocabulary.

Note how use of a table or word mat can help you to scaffold learning of English and maximise learning opportunities as the learner has the chance to hear the word and to see the written form. Providing word mats further individualises the support offered to the EAL learner.

Strategy: Peer support

Dialogic teaching which encourages the use of discussion to explore ideas and develop understanding is part of the teaching practices of many educators today. Peer support can be used as an assessment strategy in which learners are able to offer each other suggestions on their work. Alongside this, peer support can be especially useful for new-to-English learners to practise their developing language skills. You can pair learners together who have similar abilities or organise learners by mixed ability, depending on the task. EAL learners will benefit from working with native English speakers and can also benefit from working with other EAL learners working at a similar language level.

10. All about us

Ask your learners to work together to share ideas and answer teacher-directed questions. Making this an expectation for any session can quickly involve EAL learners, even those who are new starters. You could set up reporter roles and key questions for your learners to create a class fact file. Whenever a new starter arrives, your class reporter can conduct an interview to find out some key information to share with you for the class fact file. When you have set an expectation that the learners will always share their findings, whether from interviews or paired discussions or any other talk opportunities, then EAL learners might feel encouraged from the example set by others.

11. Language partners

You can encourage new-to-English learners with support from peers who have the same mother tongue but are more advanced in their English language skills. Teachers can find the support from more advanced EAL learners invaluable. You might make use of language partners to help a new starter settle but more helpfully you can encourage extended conversations about particular topics. The advanced EAL learner benefits from the challenge of translating key aspects of the conversation into English and the new-to-English learner has the opportunity to be challenged in their mother tongue. Other learners might explain different word classes to their new-to-English peer, enabling them to practise their developing grasp of features such as nouns, verbs and adjectives as they help their peer.

12. Practice partners

If the new-to-English learner does not have the support from a peer who has the same mother tongue, peer support can still be useful. Other learners in the class can support a new-to-English learner to practise their language skills while they practise using the appropriate grammatical terminology. When you teach different grammatical structures, fronted adverbials for example, make it an expectation that your learners explain the language they are using. Practice partners can share their language skills even if they are at different levels; for example a learner working on complex sentences needs knowledge of simple sentences so can therefore help someone working at this level.

Strategy in action

Here is a teacher who makes regular use of peer discussion to facilitate learning explaining the task. Note the combination of language and practice partner work.

"Right, now that we have learned about different word classes I want you to explain your understanding to your partner.

Start with the expert interview approach: your partner needs to share everything they know. You can do this in any language to check your ideas first.

Then I want you to really think carefully and tweet what you know.

Yes, you can come up with the tweet together. But it must be only 140 characters ... decide what you can explain most clearly ...

* How might a new-to-English learner benefit from this?

* Consider how a language partner task might be added to this.

* How can 'tweeting' challenge more advanced EAL learners?

Answers

[check] New-to-English learners have the opportunity to hear English used by more confident peers and to practise their use of spoken English within a fixed number of words in an activity like this.

[check] You can easily add a language partner element through asking for a tweet composed in the mother tongue. Translation can be readily tackled as the topic is fixed for the pair.

[check] More confident English speakers may find it challenging to explain their understanding in a limited number of words, therefore ensuring all learners are making progress.

(Continues…)


Excerpted from "Primary EAL Provision in a Week"
by .
Copyright © 2018 Kirsty Anderson.
Excerpted by permission of Critical Publishing Ltd.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Table of Contents

Meet the author, iv,
Meet the series editor, iv,
Introduction, v,
DAY 1 Tools for talking and taking part, 1,
DAY 2 Strategies to develop reading and writing for EAL learners, 11,
DAY 3 Teaching EAL learners across the curriculum, 19,
DAY 4 Planning, 27,
DAY 5 Working with other adults, 35,
DAY 6 Progress, 43,
DAY 7 Beyond language support, 51,
Further reading, 59,

Customer Reviews