Post-Soul Satire: Black Identity after Civil Rights

Post-Soul Satire: Black Identity after Civil Rights

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Overview

A COLLECTION THAT EXPLORES THE ROLE OF CURRENT SATIRE IN SHAPING WHAT IT MEANS TO BE BLACK

From 30 Americans to Angry White Boy, from Bamboozled to The Boondocks, from Chappelle's Show to The Colored Museum, this collection of twenty-one essays takes an interdisciplinary look at the flowering of satire and its influence in defining new roles in black identity. As a mode of expression for a generation of writers, comedians, cartoonists, musicians, filmmakers, and visual/conceptual artists, satire enables collective questioning of many of the fundamental presumptions about black identity in the wake of the civil rights movement. Whether taking place in popular and controversial television shows, in a provocative series of short internet films, in prize-winning novels and plays, in comic strips, or in conceptual hip-hop albums, this satirical impulse has found a receptive audience both within and outside the black community.

Such works have been variously called "post-black," "post-soul," and examples of a "New Black Aesthetic." Whatever the label, this collection bears witness to a noteworthy shift regarding the ways in which African American satirists feel constrained by conventional obligations when treating issues of racial identity, historical memory, and material representation of blackness.

Among the artists examined in this collection are Paul Beatty, Dave Chappelle, Trey Ellis, Percival Everett, Donald Glover (a.k.a. Childish Gambino), Spike Lee, Aaron McGruder, Lynn Nottage, ZZ Packer, Suzan Lori-Parks, Mickalene Thomas, Touré, Kara Walker, and George C. Wolfe. The essays intentionally seek out interconnections among various forms of artistic expression. Contributors look at the ways in which contemporary African American satire engages in a broad-ranging critique that exposes fraudulent, outdated, absurd, or otherwise damaging mindsets and behaviors both within and outside the African American community.

Essays by Bertram D. Ashe, Thomas R. Britt, Darryl Dickson-Carr, James J. Donahue, Michael B. Gillespie, Gillian Johns, Luvena Kopp, Jennifer Larson, Cameron Leader-Picone, Brandon Manning, Marvin McAllister, Danielle Fuentes Morgan, Derek Conrad Murray, Kinohi Nishikawa, Keenan Norris, Christian Schmidt, Linda Furgerson Selzer, Terrence T. Tucker, Sam Vásquez, Aimee Zygmonski

DEREK C. MAUS, Potsdam, New York, is associate professor of English at SUNY Potsdam. He is the author of Unvarnishing Reality: Subversive Russian and American Cold War Satire and coeditor of Finding a Way Home: A Critical Assessment of Walter Mosley's Fiction (published by University Press of Mississippi). JAMES J. DONAHUE, Potsdam, New York, is associate professor of English at SUNY Potsdam.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781617039973
Publisher: University Press of Mississippi
Publication date: 07/07/2014
Pages: 352
Product dimensions: 6.20(w) x 9.30(h) x 1.00(d)

About the Author

Derek C. Maus, Potsdam, New York, is associate professor of English at SUNY Potsdam and is the author of Unvarnishing Reality: Subversive Russian and American Cold War Satire and coeditor of Finding a Way Home: A Critical Assessment of Walter Mosley's Fiction (University Press of Mississippi).


James J. Donahue, Potsdam, New York, is associate professor of English at SUNY Potsdam.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments ix

"Mommy, What's a Post-Soul Satirist?": An Introduction Derek C. Maus xi

Post-Black Art and the Resurrection of African American Satire Derek Conrad Murray 3

Blackness We Can Believe In: Authentic Blackness and the Evolution of Aaron McGruder's The Boondocks Terrence T. Tucker 22

The Lower Frequencies: Hip-Hop Satire in the New Millennium Kinohi Nishikawa 38

Knock, Knock the Hustle: Resisting Commercialism in the African American Family Film Thomas R. Britt 56

Dirty Pretty Things: The Racial Grotesque and Contemporary Art Michael B. Gillespie 68

Percival Everett's Erasure: That Drat Aporia When Black Satire Meets "The Pleasure of the Text" Gillian Johns 85

Who's Afraid of Post-Soul Satire?: Toure's "Black Widow "Trilogy in The Portable Promised Land Bertram D. Ashe 98

Touré, Ecstatic Consumption, and Soul City: Satire and the Problem of Monoculture Linda Furgerson Selzer 110

"I Felt Like I Was Part of the Troop": Satire, Feminist Narratology, and Community Brandon Manning 125

Pilgrims in an Unholy Land: Satire and the Challenge of African American Leadership in The Boondocks and The White Boy Shuffle Cameron Leader-Picone 137

Dissimulating Blackness: The Degenerative Satires of Paul Beatty and Percival Everett Christian Schmidt 150

"It's a Black Thang Maybe": Satirical Blackness in Percival Everett's Erasure and Adam Mansbach's Angry Black White Boy Danielle Fuentes Morgan 162

Coal, Charcoal, and Chocolate Comedy: The Satire of John Killens and Mat Johnson Keenan Norris 175

How a Mama on the Couch Evolves into a Black Man with Watermelon: George C. Wolfe, Suzan-Lori Parks, and the Theatre of "Colored Contradictions" Jennifer Larson 189

"Slaves? With Lines?": Trickster Aesthetic and Satirical Strategies in Two Plays by Lynn Nottage Aimee Zygmonski 201

Satirizing Satire: Symbolic Violence and Subversion in Spike Lee's Bamboozled Luvena Kopp 214

Charlie Murphy: American Storyteller James J. Donahue 228

Embodied and Disembodied Black Satire: From Chappelle and Crockett to Key & Peele Marvin McAllister 240

Television Satire in the Black Americas: Transnational Border Crossings In Chappelle's Show and The Ity and Fancy Cat Show Sam Vásquez 254

Afterword: From Pilloried to Post-Soul: The Future of African American Satire Darryl Dickson-Carr 269

Composite Bibliography 281

Contributors 299

Index 307

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