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Poetics

Poetics

by Aristotle

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Overview

The ancient philosopher’s treatise on dramatic and literary theory.

This historic work contains Aristotle’s thoughts on poetry—lyric, epic—and drama—comedy, tragedy, satyr. It remains one of the core volumes for those with an interest in theory, criticism, philosophy, and the arts.

Delving into such topics as plot, character, rhythm, language, and catharsis, Poetics is a remarkable and essential work, sparking debate among scholars to this very day.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781504063722
Publisher: Open Road Media
Publication date: 06/30/2020
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 60
Sales rank: 152,832
File size: 1 MB

About the Author

Aristotle was a philosopher and polymath during the Classical period in ancient Greece. He was the founder of the Lyceum and the Peripatetic school of philosophy and Aristotelian tradition. Along with his teacher Plato, he has been called the “Father of Western Philosophy.”

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Chapter 1

About the poetic art itself and the forms of it, what specific capacity each has, and how one ought to put together stories if the making of them is going to hold together beautifully, and also how many and what sort of parts stories are made of, and likewise about as many other things as belong to the inquiry into poetic art, let us speak once we have first started, in accord with nature, from the things that come first.

Now epic poetry and the making of tragedy, and also comedy and dithyrambic poetry, as well as most flute-playing and lyre-playing, are all as a whole just exactly imitations, but they are different from one another in three ways, for they differ either by making their imitations in different things, by imitating different things, or by imitating differently and not in the same way. For just as some people who make images imitate many things by means of both colors and shapes (some through art and others through habituation), and others by means of the voice, so too with the arts mentioned, all of them make imitations in rhythm, speech, and harmony, and with these either separate or mixed. For example, both flute-playing and lyre-playing, and any other arts there happen to be that are of that sort in their capacity, such as the art of the Pan-pipes, use only harmony and rhythm, while the art of dancers uses rhythm itself apart from harmony (for they too, through the rhythms of their gestures, imitate states of character, feelings, and actions). But the art that uses bare words and the one that uses meters, and the latter either mixing meters with one another or using one particular kind, happen to be nameless up to now. For we have nothing to use as a name in common for the mimes of Sophron and Xenarchus and the Socratic dialogues, even if someone were to make the imitation with [iambic] trimeters or elegiac [couplets] or anything else of that sort. Instead, people connect the poetic making with the meter and name “elegiac poets,” or others “epic poets,” calling them poets not as a result of the imitation but as a result of the meter as what is common to them, for even when they bring out something medical or about nature in meter, people are accustomed to speak of them in that way. But nothing is common to Homer and Empedocles except the meter, and hence, while it is just to call the former a poet, the latter is more a student of nature than a poet. By the same token, even if someone were to make an imitation by mixing all the meters, the very way Chaeremon made the Centaur as a patchwork mixture of all the meters, one would have to call him too a poet. As for these things, then, let them be distinguished in this way. And there are some arts that use all the things mentioned—I mean, for instance, rhythm and melody and meter—as do the making of both dithyrambs and nomes, and both tragedy and comedy.

Table of Contents

Introduction
Note on the Texts and Translation
Select Bibliography
Chronology of Aristotle
Outline of the Poetics from Plato's Republic, Books II, III, and X
Aristotle's Poetics from Sir Philip Sidney's Apology for Poetry from P. B. Shelley's Defence of Poetry from Dorothy L. Sayers's Aristotle on Detective Fiction
Explanatory Notes
Note on Metre
Glossary of Key Terms
Index

Interviews

Designed for courses in undergraduate philosophy, as well as for the general reader interested in the major works of western civilization.

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