ISBN-10:
0462003043
ISBN-13:
9780462003047
Pub. Date:
04/01/2007
Publisher:
Cengage Learning
The Phantom of the Opera / Edition 1

The Phantom of the Opera / Edition 1

by Gaston Leroux, Pauline Francis
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Overview

The first in the Haunted Library Horror Classics series presented by the Horror Writers Association. An unabridged edition of the novel that inspired the famous Andrew Lloyd Weber musical.

Deep beneath the Paris Opera House, a masked man lives in silence...

Every night at the Palais Garnier, hundreds of guests sit on the edge of velvet-covered seats, waiting for prima donna La Carlotta to take the stage. But when her voice fails her, La Carlotta is replaced with unknown understudy Christine Daaé, a young soprano whose vibrant singing fills every corner of the house and wins her a slew of admirers, including an old childhood friend who soon professes his love for her. But unknown to Christine is another man, who lurks out of sight behind the heavy curtains of the opera, who can move about the building undetected, who will do anything to make sure Christine will keep singing just for him...

This curated edition of The Phantom of the Opera, based on the original 1911 English translation by Alexander Teixeira de Mattos, brings an iconic story of love and obsession to today's readers and illuminates the timeless appeal of Leroux's masterpiece.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780462003047
Publisher: Cengage Learning
Publication date: 04/01/2007
Series: Fast Track Classics Series
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 1.25(h) x 9.00(d)

About the Author

Gaston Leroux was a French journalist and playwright. Born in Paris in 1868, he abandoned a law career to become a court reporter and theater critic; as an international correspondent, he witnessed and covered the 1905 Russian Revolution. Two years later, Leroux left journalism to focus on writing fiction. He authored dozens of novels and short stories, and is considered one of the preeminent French writers of detective fiction. His most famous work, The Phantom of the Opera, was originally serialized in 1909 and 1910. He died in 1927.
 

Alexander Teixeira de Mattos (1865–1921) was Dutch-English translator and writer.

Read an Excerpt

1.
(Continues…)



Excerpted from "The Phantom of the Opera"
by .
Copyright © 2012 Gaston Leroux.
Excerpted by permission of Penguin Publishing Group.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Table of Contents

CONTENTS
PROLOGUE 3
CHAPTER I: IS IT THE GHOST? 5
CHAPTER II: THE NEW MARGARITA 9
CHAPTER III: THE MYSTERIOUS REASON 13
CHAPTER IV: BOX FIVE 16
CHAPTER V: THE ENCHANTED VIOLIN 22
CHAPTER VI: A VISIT TO BOX FIVE 28
CHAPTER VII: FAUST AND WHAT FOLLOWED 29
CHAPTER VIII: THE MYSTERIOUS BROUGHAM 36
CHAPTER IX: AT THE MASKED BALL 39
CHAPTER X: FORGET THE NAME OF THE MAN'S VOICE 43
CHAPTER XI: ABOVE THE TRAP-DOORS 46
CHAPTER XII: APOLLO'S LYRE 49
CHAPTER XIII: A MASTER-STROKE OF THE TRAP-DOOR LOVER 57
CHAPTER XIV: THE SINGULAR ATTITUDE OF A SAFETY-PIN 62
CHAPTER XV: CHRISTINE! CHRISTINE! 64
CHAPTER XVI: MME. GIRY'S ASTOUNDING REVELATIONS AS TO HER PERSONAL RELATIONS WITH THE OPERA GHOST 66
CHAPTER XVII: THE SAFETY-PIN AGAIN 71
CHAPTER XVIII: THE COMMISSARY, THE VISCOUNT AND THE PERSIAN 74
CHAPTER XIX: THE VISCOUNT AND THE PERSIAN 77
CHAPTER XX: IN THE CELLARS OF THE OPERA 80
CHAPTER XXI: INTERESTING AND INSTRUCTIVE VICISSITUDES OF A PERSIAN IN THE CELLARS OF THE OPERA 86
CHAPTER XXII: IN THE TORTURE CHAMBER 91
CHAPTER XXIII: THE TORTURES BEGIN 94
CHAPTER XXIV: "BARRELS! ... BARRELS! ... ANY BARRELS TO SELL?" 97
CHAPTER XXV: THE SCORPION OR THE GRASSHOPPER: WHICH? 101
CHAPTER XXVI: THE END OF THE GHOST'S LOVE STORY 104
EPILOGUE 108

Reading Group Guide

1. 1. Some modern critics feel the characters in The Phantom of the Opera are static and shallow, that Christine is too innocent, Raoul too noble, and Erik’s obsession with Christine never fully explained. Do you think Leroux purposely did this, and if so, why?

2. 2. The Phantom of the Opera was published as the romantic movement was slowly turning into the gothic movement. How would you classify it?

3. 3. Leroux wrote The Phantom of the Opera in a time when there was widespread French interest in Freudian psychoanalysis and particularly the libidinal/infantile/mother-seeking unconscious. How does Leroux work this into his novel? Are there characters that fit the infant or mother role?

4. 4. Some critics see the Phantom as simply the unconscious, the Freudian superego. Do you believe this is what Leroux was truly writing about, or did he give his monster more depth?

5. 5. Some see Erik as not shifting his class status, the theme of many gothic novels, but instead shifting his race. What scenes in the text help, or hinder, this assessment? Why would Leroux write of something so controversial?

6. 6. One of Leroux’s major themes in this novel is the changing of one’s class. Consider Christine, the daughter of a fairground fiddle player, now besting the most talented opera singer in Paris and winning the heart of a viscount. What is Leroux saying here? Is it meant to simply be a happy ending?

Customer Reviews

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The Phantom of the Opera 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 163 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The story is really great. But there are spelling mistakes. You can read through it but it is very annoying.
ProfessionalBookNerd More than 1 year ago
I love this book. I read it, like many before me, because I've loved the Andrew Lloyd Weber musical since childhood. I remember my mother reading the book and telling me interesting parts of it, and so I decided to read it myself a little over a year ago. It is such a beautiful story, and Leroux wrote it in such an interesting way. This book is categorized as fiction, but because of the way Leroux writes it (and because I don't know my French history) I want to believe it's real. Leroux writes that he believes the Phantom (Eric) was real. Interspersed with the story, he interjects his own opinion, and occasionally includes real(?) interviews with the characters from history. As a straight work of fiction, this is an amazing, beautiful tale of love, perseverance, the limits of the human existence, horror, suspense, sorrow... This really has everything I want in a story. At the risk of sounding like a cliche, The Phantom of the Opera made me laugh, cry, gasp, sigh, and grip the book with white knuckles. And the little bits here and there that make you want to believe it was all real... well, they make you want to go to Paris to see the opera house.

And not surprisingly, the soundtrack to Weber's musical makes really good background music while reading this. Grab a tissue at the end.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Heard the music from the show long before ever seeing it live. After hearing the music I bought the book, then finally got to see the show. The book and show/movie are different from eachother, like the show better but it was nice to have the extra background on the characters. And to the person who said that the actor playing the Phantom opposite Emmy Rossum was Australian is wrong, sorry. He's actually Scottish, the Phantom was played by Gerard Butler in the 2004 movie.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Why does everyone go with Erik? Sure I feel bad for him but killing people just to be near Christine is too obsesive. He is a murderer and all of you who say "she should have gone with Erik" would you marry a serial killer? Roul was decant kind loving and gentle. He didnt try to make her love him, he waited for her. That is true romance.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is my favofite movie and i loved the book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Different from the movie but an amazing read. The characters are interesting and the phantom was really cynical. Great read
factory on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This story is very famous. I had not read though I knew the title of this story. This story is a talk that centers on the true colors of the ghost that appears in the opera house. Because the story of the original had been easily brought together as for this book, it was very comprehensible. Because characters' names were French, it was not easy to have read. This title is very fear but story was very interesting!
theokester on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
My prior exposure to The Phantom of the Opera is almost exclusively tied to the Broadway musical (or the movie musical adaptation of the Broadway play). Apart from that, all I knew about the Phantom came from random references in Scooby Doo or other peripherally related media. Thus I wasn't at all surprised to find the book have significant differences from what I know of the Phantom. Still, I felt a general sense of familiarity to the story and could envision many of the scenes¿probably my biggest struggle was to stop internally singing songs from the play as I read the book.As was the case of many of the novels of the time, this book includes significant commentary from the author as he emphasizes that this is a true story that he has happened upon and researched over time. The author assures us that he has personally vetted out the claims of the research materials he has used and that he has personally investigated the locations of the story. This technique always strikes me as a little interesting and makes me laugh a little at the mindset of novelists and readers of a century ago. In spite of the fact that this story is certainly a work of fiction, it is very evident that Leroux conducted at least a moderate degree of research. At the very least, he had a great knowledge of the layout, look and feel of the Paris Opera House. The edition I read included an article in the appendix from a historian who commented on the attention to detail and accuracy. The article commented on the nature of the descriptions of the Opera House in the book as compared with reality. It indicated that there was certain literary license in some areas of the description (particularly with regards to some of the secret passages and such), but for the most part the book presented a true and accurate representation of the Opera House and could serve as a valid reference.Apart from the accuracy of the descriptions, I found the descriptive nature of the text very engaging but not overly so. I wasn't distracted from the descriptions, but I felt like I had a vivid feel for the Opera House (and other locales) and could truly envision the scenes presented. The characters felt a little stereotypical and predictable to me¿though part of that could be due to my knowledge of the story as well as the fact that this story is a century old and perhaps when it initially came out, the characters were more unique than they are today.For those who have seen or are familiar with the Broadway play, you'll be familiar with a lot of the general aspects of the story. I can't speak to other film versions of the story. There are quite a few significant differences in the story as well. Probably the biggest difference is that there are many more scenes that happen away from the Opera House. In the play, we go up on the roof at one point and I believe the graveyard scene is supposed to happen away from the Opera House (it's been a while since I saw the play¿and my memory is unclear). In the book, we find out where Raul and his brother live. We find out where Christine grew up and lives away from the Opera House. We wander the streets around the city. There's more backstory given to Christine as well as to her earlier interaction with Raul. We hear the folk story around the "Angel of Music" and understand even more why he is so enticing to her. All of these elements helped enrich the book and will certainly throw some interesting light on the play.Where things got a little weird for me in the book was in the character of the Phantom as well as a character not in the play¿the Persian. We get an interesting back story on the Phantom's life prior to coming to the Paris Opera House. This story is intriguing though I think a lot of my interest was more in the way the story was laid out. Rather than giving you the whole story at once, which could have been done easily enough, we get hints and allegations throughout that allude to the Phantom having previousl
ChihiroNa on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This story was mysterious.The phantom was terrible man.But he was poor man, too.
RachelPenso on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
My brother (who is a manager at Powell's City of Books) found me this copy of this book. I absolutely love it. It truly adds to the story.
ck2935 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed Leroux's descriptions of the Paris Opera House.
LilyEvans on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I borrowed this book from a friend because I really loved the soundtrack about two years ago when I first heard it. Unfortunately, I never got the chance to read the actual book. I read it in the span of a day while traveling on vacation (in the car and on the train). It was a pretty good book, though I felt it was dragged on a bit and I got a bit bored sometimes. But I loved the suspense and I kept wanting to read. I love mysteries about history, so I thought this was a pretty good book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This copy is terribly typed up. Spelling mistakes throughout and even a full page left out. Worth the extra money.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Wouldn't call it an extraordinary piece of literature, but it wasn't terrible.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Its a great book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Y u no luv me!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great read for anyone, really. The writing is amazing; the plot, the settings, the imagery of this book is beauriful. It definitely changes one's opinions on the characters from the movie. They are different in the book. They've made me see them differently in the movie now, though not necessarily in a bad way. Loved this book, love the movie, do recommend!???
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
YOU WILL CURSE THE DAY YOU SAID I DO, WHEN IT WAS PHANTOM WHO ASKED YOU...first. (totally look up phantom of the awkward and watch it. LOVE IT! ot will only make sense you have seen ze Phantom of yhr Opera.)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Oh my goodness! I litterally just saw the play today and it was......AMAZING!:)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I saw it like twice and i loved it ssssooooooo much! It is called Love Never Dies. P.s. it is a movie so look it up.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The music was amazing and the story is wonderful.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love the book and the movie and I love how Emma Rossum played as christine and did you know the actor of the phantom in the movie is really astraulian?