Paradise Lost (with an Introduction by M. Macmillan)

Paradise Lost (with an Introduction by M. Macmillan)

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Overview

English poet John Milton's 17th century epic poem, "Paradise Lost," is the work for which he is best known and which would solidify his reputation as one of the greatest poets of all time. A classic retelling of Biblical legend, the poem relates the stories of the war in heaven, the fall of man, and the temptation of Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden. First depicted in Revelation, Milton portrays the angel Lucifer's denial of God's authority over him and the failed rebellion that he leads as a consequence of this belief. Lucifer is cast out of Heaven and into Hell by God for his betrayal. The temptation of Adam and Eve by Satan and their subsequent fall from innocence forms the other major narrative arc in "Paradise Lost." As described in the work by Milton his purpose in writing this epic masterpiece was to "justify the ways of God to men." Milton's work is one of sublime and extraordinary beauty which has inspired readers and been analyzed by critics ever since its original publication in 1667. This edition includes an introduction by M. Macmillan and is printed on premium acid-free paper.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781420953305
Publisher: Neeland Media
Publication date: 05/21/2016
Pages: 262
Sales rank: 635,936
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.59(d)

About the Author

As a young student, John Milton (1608-1674) dreamed of bringing the poetic elocution of Homer and Virgil to the English language. Milton realized this dream with his graceful, sonorous Paradise Lost, now considered the most influential epic poem in English literature. In sublime poetry of extraordinary beauty, Paradise Lost has inspired generations of artists and their works, ranging from the Romantic poets to the books of J. R. R. Tolkien.

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Paradise Lost 4.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 616 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Paradise Lost and The Canterbury Tales are the most super writings I have ever had the pleasure to read!!! I reccomend them both!!!
vibrantminds on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A 17th century epic of the Genesis account with references to classical mythology throughout. From the beginning formations of the earth to the design of paradise to the creation of Adam and Eve to the Fall. The idea behind the verse is that paradise is lost but hope still remains through Christ who will save the offspring of our first parents who sinned. Adam is shown a vision when his hope is diminished that encompasses all of humanity from Noah to Abraham to Joseph of Egypt to David and up through Christ¿s birth and death. The world is corrupt but there is hope for all in the end. Very difficult but interesting to read; there are notes to help through all the references to the mythology and other passages that we today are unfamiliar with.
Anagarika-Sean on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This book was fantastic, but wasn't quite as good as Dante's work. Still, one of my favorites.
ztutz on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Certainly one of the best poems ever written in English!
TiffGabler on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Don't care if it's blasphemy, Satan is awesome!!! He becomes a character that drives a much needed retelling of Genesis. Milton knew how to use his character and his words to create a book that was one of only two that would usually be found in anyone's house during the 18th and 19th century.
HvyMetalMG on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Seeing as I took a class - an entire class, an entire semester dedicated to the reading of this single novel, I was praying I was going to enjoy it. And what heavy metal fan couldn't enjoy the battle of God vs. Satan? The fall of Satan from heaven is a brilliantly written tale and there is so much meaning within every stanza of this epic book. There has to be, I spent 3 months reading it and I think I even got a B in this class.
Amabel300 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Although this is not a light read and will require thought and maybe some research (on my part at least) to fully understand milton's meanings, this book is at very least profound. Milton's writing style has yet to be matched by any I've seen.
amydross on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Milton gets extra points for scope and ambition, but I have to admit that he tends toward the preachy (rather than allowing his characters to illustrate their own morals), plus some of his theology struck me as a bit simple-minded. That said, the descriptions of hell remain both beautiful and terrible -- unparalleled in the English language.
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