Owlknight (Owl Mage Trilogy #3)

Owlknight (Owl Mage Trilogy #3)

by Mercedes Lackey, Larry Dixon

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Overview

From fantasy legends Mercedes Lackey and Larry Dixon comes the third and final volume in a powerful saga charged with war and magic, life and love....

Two years after his parents disappearance, Darian has sought refuge and training from the mysterious Hawkbrothers. Now he has opened his heart to a beautiful young healer. Finally Darian has found peace and acceptance in his life. That is, until he learns that his parents are still alive-and trapped behind enemy borders....

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780886779160
Publisher: DAW
Publication date: 11/28/2000
Series: Owl Mage Trilogy Series , #3
Pages: 464
Sales rank: 142,198
Product dimensions: 4.20(w) x 6.80(h) x 1.00(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Mercedes Lackey is a full-time writer and has published numerous novels and works of short fiction, including the best-selling Heralds Of Valdemar series. She is also a professional lyricist and a licensed wild bird rehabilitator. She lives in Oklahoma with her husband, artist Larry Dixon, and their flock of parrots.

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Owlknight (Owl Mage Trilogy Series #3) 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 64 reviews.
Lisa_RR_H More than 1 year ago
This is the concluding book in the Owl Mage series, that began with Owlflight and continues in Owlsight, so you should read those first. I'm a fan of Lackey's Valdemar books, and for a fan this is well worth the read. What's best about it, I think, is the world-building. In this story we get to see more beyond the Heralds and horse-shaped companions of the first books, and it's fun to see the fleshing out of the Hawkbrothers, the gryphons, the dyheli, and she's good at giving a sense of an alien sensibility with those last. There's also innovative, inventive magic in this trilogy I enjoy. I certainly enjoyed the novels, including this conclusion, and it's better than many a published fantasy out there. If I'm only giving this 3 stars, it's because I think there is better among Lackey's works, and Darian's story never quite touches me the way say Talia's and Vanyel's did. (Talia's story is the first of the Valdemar books, begun in Arrows of the Queen, and if you've never read Lackey's Valdemar tales, that's where I'd start)
Guest More than 1 year ago
I always enjoy Ms. Lackey's Valdemar books, and this one was no exception. But in the 'Owl____' series, I found myself skimming over huge chunks of laboriously described details, especially at the beginning of the books. It seems as though the stories would have been very entertaining novellas, but loads of minutia was added to expand them into novels. The details were well-written, but they didn't do enough to move the plot along, and I found myself wanting to get to something that MEANT SOMETHING! The books are either 'slice of life' or they're plot-driven. We've come to expect plot-driven books from Ms. Lackey, so this attempt to be both was a bit frustrating. Still, it made for a pleasant evening's entertainment, and was great to read while relaxing in a bathtub.
jjmcgaffey on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Yeah, that's good. It takes quite a while to get started - the first third or more is planning for and description of some complicated ceremonies, welcoming the Heralds who will be stationed in the Vale (including Shandi) while making Darian a knight of Valdemar and a brother of the Ghost Cat tribe. Then chance and choice combine and Darian learns that his parents are still alive, and far to the north. He and his friends set out to find them, with adventures of many sorts along the way - from encounters with yet more Northern spirit-totems to a battle with a cold-drake. What they find is all Darian could have hoped for, and more, and less; the final battle with the Eclipse Shaman is - almost a distraction from the real story. The ending always makes me cry, and laugh. And a proper happy-ever-after to round things out. Darian's story is much lighter, and smaller in scope, than some of the others; it's not one of my favorites, either, though quite enjoyable. But there are some scenes, mostly in this book, that are up to the best in the rest of the Valdemar stories. Good book.
LisaMaria_C on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is the concluding book in the Owl Mage series, that began with Owlflight and continues in Owlsight, so you should read those first. I'm a fan of Lackey's Valdemar books, and for a fan this is well worth the read. What's best about it, I think, is the world-building. In this story we get to see more beyond the Heralds and horse-shaped Companions of the first Valdemar books, and it's fun to see the fleshing out of the Hawkbrothers, the gryphons, the dyheli; Lackey's good at giving a sense of an alien sensibility with those last, deer-shaped magical creatures. There's also innovative, inventive magic in this trilogy I appreciated.I certainly enjoyed the novels, including this conclusion, and it's better than many a published fantasy out there. If I'm only giving this 3 stars, it's because I think there is better among Lackey's works, and Darian's story never quite touches me the way say Talia's and Vanyel's did. I doubt I'd ever want to reread the Owl trilogy. (Talia's story is the first of the Valdemar books, begun in Arrows of the Queen, and if you've never read Lackey's Valdemar tales, that's where I'd start. Or with Vanyel's story in Magic's Pawn, which comes earlier chronologically)
SunnySD on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Darian has never quite given up hope of finding his parents. Now, even as the K'Vala Vale matures into a real place of peace and negotiation between envoys - even the arrival of a real, honest-to-goodness Herald Mage on permanent posting - he finds his thoughts turning to what might have befallen them. Fortuitously, signs that his father may have survived coincide with the appearance of a familiarly marked piece of trade goods from the far northwest. Tracking them will be a difficult proposition, but with a team of ready volunteers, not impossible.A bit rushed feeling, but not an unlikely conclusion to the trilogy.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Love this author, love this series!
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