Omega (Priscilla ''Hutch'' Hutchins Series #4)

Omega (Priscilla ''Hutch'' Hutchins Series #4)

by Jack McDevitt

Paperback(Mass Market Paperback - Reprint)

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Overview

A civilization-destroying omega cloud has switched direction, heading straight for a previously unexplored planetary system—and its alien society. And suddenly, a handful of brave humans must try to save an entire world—without revealing their existence.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780441012107
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 11/01/2004
Series: Priscilla "Hutch" Hutchins Series , #4
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 512
Sales rank: 281,277
Product dimensions: 4.20(w) x 6.75(h) x 1.05(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Jack McDevitt is a former naval officer, taxi driver, customs officer and motivational trainer. He is a multiple Nebula Award finalist who lives in Georgia with his wife Maureen.

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Omega 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 25 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A refreshing, feel good read.
closedmouth on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
(Reviewed January 16, 2009)He did it again. McDevitt sets up a brilliant, fascinating idea, with depth, mystery, and promise, and then promptly throws all that away so he can indulge in yet another tangential race against time. It's so frustrating. There's so much potential here, and it's squandered so willingly I felt a bit angry as I was reading it. And his growing approval of faith and religion made my stomach churn.
BrowncoatLibrarian on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
"Omega," a mid-series entry in the Priscilla Hutchins group of novels, is a slightly off-beat, unusual work for Jack McDevitt, but serves to prove that "unusual" can certainly be a good thing.The omega clouds are back, and one is headed for a populated world whose low-technology inhabitants have no idea what is on the way. Public opinion on Earth is split: do we intervene, or let nature take its course? When footage of the awkward- but friendly-looking aliens is released to the public, many people decide that they must be saved. Thus begins the great race of creativity versus destruction. After all: how does one stop a malignant cloud?Drawing upon lessons learned in previous encounters - and of the artifacts of the famous monument makers themselves - a team of specialists sets out to protect the hapless aliens from certain destruction.This novel is definitely a departure from the McDevitt norm. Gone are the sweeping, galaxy-hopping adventures following cosmic bread crumbs in the effort to unravel an age-old mystery. No, Omega is about something much smaller, but with much more emotional impact. Readers will find themselves rooting for the survival of a technologically inferior - but ethical and intelligent - species that has never, and can never, know that we were there. Other reviewers have made this a much-maligned book for its focus on what they see as an unremarkable set of circumstances. However, fans of the McDevitt novels will see this for what it is: a change in perspective. Rather than looking at a huge stage with an infinite set of circumstances, McDevitt has instead focused on one particular place, with one very serious problem and, rather than trying to solve some esoteric mystery buried in the stars, seeks to examine something much closer to home - are we ourselves civilized enough to save another civilization?This is definitely a McDevitt to read, and re-read, with great relish.-BrowncoatLibrarian
kp9949 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The fourth book of a series. A series I must say I have enjoyed very much. The story begins in the year 2234 and Priscilla Hutchens is still a major character. The other books revolved around her; but, this time, she is more of a background figure. "Omega" clouds were discovered a quarter of a century before the story begins. These clouds are destroying every civilization they come across. Now one is about to destroy the planet, "Lookout" taking all of its inhabitants (nicknamed "Goompahs" with it. Now, those on earth who have a stake in space exploration are hoping to either stop completely this destruction or, at least, to minimize it. It's a fun read.
amandacb on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed the premise of the book, but I felt the author himself didn't quite know how to handle the omega clouds. There was an overwhelming vagueness in the descriptions and it felt like a piece of the story was missing. The narration kept jumping from character to character and it was difficult (for me) to follow.
plappen on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Set a couple of centuries from now, after mankind has begun to explore the galaxy, this novel is about deadly clouds of energy called omegas. Their purpose seems to be to wipe out any civilization they encounter. A cloud is heading for Earth, but it won¿t arrive for another 900 years. While research continues into what makes omegas tick, it¿s a problem for future humans. It becomes an immediate crisis when a survey ship reports that the cloud has turned, and is heading for a previously unexplored system. It just happens to contain a thriving, pre-industrial civilization, and the cloud will arrive in a few months.In many years of diligent searching, mankind has found a number of dead civilizations, but only two living ones, neither of whom are interested in Contact with anyone. Saving this civilization suddenly becomes Top Priority. An exploration ship already in the area is able to sneak on to the surface, and the personnel plants many audio and video pickups, beaming language to a ship full of linguists, already in transit. Their ship, in bad need of an overhaul, is pressed into service too early, and breaks down before reaching the planet. A supply ship is able to join the exploration ship, and an attempt is made to fool with the planet¿s weather, hiding the cities under thick clouds. All attempts to stop the cloud, or alter its course, fail.For the humans already in orbit, how do they tell the inhabitants that they must immediately flee their cities? Who do they tell? Will their warnings be heeded? How do they do it without violating the Noninterference Directive?As usual with McDevitt, this story is first-rate from beginning to end. It has good characters, and few, if any, wasted words. It does a fine job of holding the attention of the reader.
lostinmyownlibrary on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Omega by Jack McDevitt The human race has found a way to explore the universe, and also found a destructive force they have dubbed Omegas. Omegas are essentially clouds that have a mean streak for anything with right angles ( anything that doesn't appear in nature ), and one has its sight set on Lookout. Lookout is a planet of one of 3 species mankind has found. So a rescue mission is sent to help. I found this book to be very entertaining and only have one complaint. I had a problem with the way beliefs were scrutinized, but the end of the story made up for it.
figre on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This book reminded me of a very important point. If you are a science fiction fan, and you haven¿t read any hard science fiction lately, take a break and go and read some. (Quick aside to the none science fiction fan ¿ hard science fiction is not complicated or tough to read, it is simply based on basic scientific principles and tends to focus on hardware and space. This is a gross generalization, but you get the idea.) This is a perfect example of the genre, and a well-written one to boot.This is a sequel to McDevitt¿s novel Chindi. (While some of the concepts are carried forward and the previous book referenced, it is not really necessary to have read it to enjoy this book.) A recently discovered race (affectionately called the Goompahs) is about to be destroyed by one of the Omega ¿ cloudlike presences that are roaming the universe indiscriminately destroying anything that appears to be ¿man¿ made. This novel tells the story of humanity¿s race to save the Goompahs. There are triumphs and setbacks and the lives of many people intermingling. In other words, it is classic science fiction told in a skilled way.I¿m not going to say this is the greatest thing since sliced Tribbles, but you can go very much more wrong than to pick up and read this book.
clong on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is my favorite McDevitt novel to date. It is a little less action driven, and a lot more thought provoking. The Goompahs are an interesting alien race, not because they are compellingly different, but because of how similar they are to humans in many ways (although with a few telling differences). I particularly enjoyed the role of the theater and the arts in Goompah society. And the role of religion in any society is given a sensitive treatment. The cast of protagonists is made up of reasonably normal, everyday people thrown into a situation where they choose to act heroically, to risk their lives for a noble cause. And in McDevitt's universe, when people take risks, there are usually prices to be paid. While some aspects of the climax were predictable, others were surprising. And there were smaller surprises sprinkled throughout the book.
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Usual guality. Much enjoyed
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
WERE JUST ROLEPLAYING!!! --ever--