Ojibwe Singers: Hymns, Grief, and a Native Culture in Motion

Ojibwe Singers: Hymns, Grief, and a Native Culture in Motion

by Michael D. McNally

NOOK Book(eBook)

$113.99 $139.99 Save 19% Current price is $113.99, Original price is $139.99. You Save 19%. View All Available Formats & Editions

Available on Compatible NOOK Devices and the free NOOK Apps.
WANT A NOOK?  Explore Now
LEND ME® See Details

Overview

The Ojibwe or Anishinaabe are a native American people of the northern Great Lakes region. 19th-century missionaries promoted the singing of evangelical hymns translated into the Ojibwe language as a tool for rooting out their "indianness," but the Ojibwe have ritualized the singing to make the hymns their own. In this book, McNally relates the history and current practice of Ojibwe hymn singing to explore the broader cultural processes that place ritual resources at the center of so many native struggles to negotiate the confines of colonialism.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780190285487
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Publication date: 09/21/2000
Series: Religion in America
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
File size: 3 MB

Table of Contents

Introduction and Overview 3(20)
PART I: HISTORY
Sacred Musics
Traditional Ojibwe Music and Protestant Hymnody
23(20)
Ojibwes, Missionaries, and Hymn Singing, 1828--1867
43(82)
Music as Negotiation
Uses of Hymn Singing, 1868--1934
81(44)
PART II: ETHNOGRAPHY
Twentieth-Century Hymn Singing as Cultural Criticism
125(82)
Music as Memory
Contemporary Hymn Singing and the Politics of Death in Native America
165(30)
CONCLUSION: DOES HYMN SINGING WORK?
Notes on the Logic of Ritual Practice
195(12)
Notes 207(22)
Glossary 229(2)
Selected Bibliography 231(10)
Index 241

Customer Reviews