Ogre, Ogre (Magic of Xanth #5)

Ogre, Ogre (Magic of Xanth #5)

by Piers Anthony

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Overview

When a Nymph rides a Night Mare, Ogre beware!

Smash knew all about ogres. After all, despite his having a human mother, Smash was an ogre himself. Ogres were not only huge and horribly ugly, as Smash was; they were also so stupid they could hardly speak, and they spent most of their time fighting, destroying, and eating young girls.

So what was he doing here with seven assorted females looking to him to guide them and save them? Even in Xanth, where magic made anything possible, why should Tandy the Nymph trust him and seem fond of him? And how could all that high-flown conversation be coming out of his mouth?

But that, it seemed, was what he got for going to Good Magician Humfrey for an Answer—before he even knew what the Question was!

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780345354921
Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
Publication date: 11/28/1987
Series: Magic of Xanth Series , #5
Pages: 320
Sales rank: 131,357
Product dimensions: 4.24(w) x 6.83(h) x 0.87(d)
Age Range: 14 - 18 Years

About the Author

Piers Anthony, sometimes called Pier Xanthony, is the pseudonym of a Mundane character who was born in England in 1934, came to America in 1940, was naturalized in 1958, and moved to Xanth in 1977. His first story was published in 1963, and his first novel, Chthon, in 1967. His first Xanth novel, A Spell for Chameleon, won the August Derleth Fantasy Award as the best novel for 1977, and his fantasy novels began placing on the New York Times bestseller list with Ogre, Ogre. He shifted from writing in pencil to writing on the computer, and Golem in the Gears was his first novel created on the machine; naturally, the computer found its way into Xanth.

Read an Excerpt

Chapter 1. Nightmare
(Continues…)



Excerpted from "Ogre, Ogre"
by .
Copyright © 1987 Piers Anthony.
Excerpted by permission of Random House Publishing Group.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Customer Reviews

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Ogre, Ogre 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 40 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is excellent I love how the charactors blended it's sort of a beauty and the beast type of story told the only way Piers could tell it this book is based on one of the co charactors from the last book I love the wy Piers turns the co charactors into main charactors and he just keeps adding new and exciting people and things as well as keeps the old one alive and it's very eciting to see the land of Xanth broaden and get bigger with each book as you'll notice if you check the map this book was fun and romantic if you think a ogre is romantic and it was just an overall good book thank you Piers another great book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
love+the+play+on+words
Scoshie on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
# 5 -- laughs keep on coming-- keep up the good workThey travel about Xanth, and Smash acquires other young women who travel with him and whom he protects. Along the way, he is infected with the Eye Queue vine, which makes him intelligent (although actually invoking his human half) making him distressed as ogres are not supposed to be smart in any way. As he finds an antidote to his intelligence, he undergoes several adventures; saving Tandy from the dream realm in the gourd and smashing (true to his name) the Gap Dragon. Soon he finds matchs and finds solutions to all of the women, who leave one by one.
hermit on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This book is has decent puns and is one worth reading if you like the series. Smash is an ogre. They love to fight, the uglier the better and brains is something to be avoided. It has some great fights which shows the strength of an ogre. Smash runs into an Eye Queue (IQ) vine and becomes smart. He regards it as a curse, as ogres are proud of their stupidity. Ogres are also soulless, emotionless creatures, and Smash is not; over the course of the adventure he becomes more and more of what we would call human like. Though Smash knows he is an Ogre. His adventure triggers new feelings, which at first he doesn't understand, and eventually becomes comfortable with the idea of being a soulful human being while maintaining the ability to bash someone's brain in at need. When you remember Smash's speech patterns, you forget how horrible Ogres' are suppose to be.
drinkingtea on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Not as good as some of the others in this series, but definitely a respectably fun book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was the first novel-length book I read, back at the relatively innocent age of 13 or so. Xanth became a major part of my life for and continues to inspire. It was something for me not unlike what Harry Potter has become. Ostensibly it’s for children or young adults though the material is universal, especially for the modern world and can be appreciated by people of any age. Anthony’s writing style is nuanced and infused and good humor (and witty puns!)  The half-ogre Smash journeys across Xanth in search of the magician Humphrey and discovers that, perhaps, his question is his answer. This was my introduction to the magical world of Xanth. At the time I was not able to appreciate fully the importance or lasting significance of these books for people crossing that magical and mysterious threshold. The only thing I would change now is to read the books in the order of the series, but this is a small matter.  To the review(er) from March 3, 2011, it's your loss you that apparently didn't actually read the book but  only wrote a cynical review based on very little information -- obviously taken wildly out of context.  Ogre, Ogre certainly made me laugh -- and sob and experience a kaleidoscope of human feelings. I can't think of a more appropriate place for this book than a school library.  I wish for my child to experience the wonder Mr. Anthony provided me. I will be recommending these books to my son -- and all people –- especially of that age though certainly not exclusively. Thank you, Mr. Anthony.
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