Norwood

Norwood

by Charles Portis

Paperback(1st Vintage Books ed)

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Overview

Sent on a mission to New York he gets involved in a wild journey that takes him in and out of stolen cars, freight trains, and buses. By the time he returns home to Texas, Norwood has met his true love, Rita Lee, on a bus; befriended the second shortest midget in show business and “the world's smallest perfect fat man”; and helped Joann “the chicken with a college education,” realize her true potential in life. As with all Portis’ fiction, the tone is cool, sympathetic, and funny.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780394729312
Publisher: Random House, Incorporated
Publication date: 09/12/1985
Series: Vintage Contemporaries Series
Edition description: 1st Vintage Books ed
Pages: 190

About the Author

Charles Portis lives in Arkansas, where he was born and educated. He served in the Marine Corps during the Korean War, was the London bureau chief of the New York Herald-Tribune, and was a writer for The New Yorker.

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Norwood 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 15 reviews.
TheAnonymousDude More than 1 year ago
Suppose Sal Paradise had been a peckerwood instead of a hipster. Enter Norwood Pratt, who goes walk about in the 1950's. The book is perhaps not as obviously profound as On The Road, but makes up for it in quirky humor. If you're into quirky humor, it's one fine ride taking a road trip with Norwood. One caveat though about the language. Much in the vein of Mark Twain, some of the characters use the "N" word liberally. It's true to the racist attitudes of the time and places (I was there), but it's kind of jarring to run into anyway. The way it is presented, that is perhaps the point Portis is making on that score. Just a heads up though. I still highly recommend Norwood.
jeffome on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Sort of a cute little novel of minimal depth dealing with some farly simple (meaning uncomplicated) folks. My second Portis in a row, having just finished 'True Grit.' Portis does have an interesting method of just letting his characters ramble on about not much of anything, but once you've gotten through it, you realize that you just learned an awful lot about them. I like that sort of cleverness, and i do remember much of that in True Grit as well. A very quick read.
Hagelstein on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
In ¿Norwood¿, as in life, the journey is more important than the destination. Norwood Pratt is an ex-marine from Ralph, Texas determined to travel to New York City to collect $70.00 owed him by a former marine buddy. Being the 1950s, $70.00 is a significant amount. His other and more nebulous goal is to become a ¿hillbilly music¿ star.Norwood is launched on his journey by a huckster¿s offer of a job delivering two cars ¿ which he insists are not stolen ¿ and of course are. Along the way Norwood meets a surly bread delivery man who finger-pokes the competitor¿s loaves; an educated chicken; an ex-circus midget known as ¿the world¿s smallest perfect fat man,¿ and the girl of his dreams. Deadpan humor and crisp writing and dialogue make ¿Norwood¿ an entirely satisfying story.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is easily one of the weirdest books I've read. There were a few parts that I had to re-read because I missed something. That said, this was an excellent book. There was an eclectic variety of characters and settings that were bizarre and humerous simultaneously. Overall, very good.
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