Negotiating Under Fire: Preserving Peace Talks in the Face of Terror Attacks

Negotiating Under Fire: Preserving Peace Talks in the Face of Terror Attacks

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Overview

The impact of severe security crises on peace negotiations represents one of the most significant facets of modern conflict resolution theory to remain under-researched. It also stands out as the factor most likely to derail inherently sensitive negotiations. Negotiating Under Fire explores how such crises between two nations impact diplomatic initiatives between those countries. How do the negotiators' willingness and ability to continue influence the outcome? Do the levels of legitimacy, trust, and confidence within and between the parties change in such strained negotiations? Through a detailed analysis of three critical moments in the 'slo peace process—the Baruch Goldstein Hebron massacre of 1994, the Nachshon Wachsman kidnapping and execution of 1994, and the nine-day string of suicide bus bombings carried out in Israel in March of 1996—the author concludes that insurgents or those hostile to peace talks can and do undermine negotiations.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780742551626
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
Publication date: 08/28/2008
Pages: 360
Sales rank: 889,513
Product dimensions: 6.33(w) x 9.38(h) x 1.17(d)

About the Author

Dr. Matthew Levitt teaches at Johns Hopkins University and is a senior fellow and director of the Stein Program on Counterterrorism and Intelligence at The Washington Institute for Near East Policy. From 2005 to 2007, he served as Deputy Assistant Secretary for Intelligence and Analysis at the US Department of the Treasury. Previously, he served as an FBI counterterrorism analyst.

Table of Contents

Foreword
Acknowledgments
Chapter 1. Introduction
Chapter 2. The Hebron Massacre
Chapter 3. The Wachsman Abduction and Murder
Chapter 4. The 1996 Suicide Bus Bombings
Chapter 5. A Focused Comparison of the Goldstein, Wachsman, and 1996 Bombings Crises
Chapter 6 Conclusion: Toward a Theory of Crisis Management under Conditions of Ongoing Negotiations

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