Natural Alternatives (o T C) to Over-The-counter and Prescription Drugs

Natural Alternatives (o T C) to Over-The-counter and Prescription Drugs

by Michael & N D Murray, Michael T Murray

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Overview

Is there really a safer, more effective natural alternative to most prescription and over-the-counter medicines? Yes.

In Natural Alternatives to Over-the-Counter and Prescription Drugs, his groundbreaking book, naturopathic physician Michael T. Murray provides specific natural alternatives to some of the drugs most used by Americans, including Tagamet, Prednisone, Seldane, and Zantac. Examining the side effects and effectiveness of many of the drugs used today, Murray shows how these drugs can be replaced with less expensive natural remedies whose medicinal benefits have been proven in clinical studies. He discusses how herbs, vitamins, minerals, extracts, and ointments can be used to bring relief from a wide array of specific ailments, including:

  • Diabetes
  • Asthma, hay fever, and the common cold
  • High blood pressure and high cholesterol
  • Arthritis
  • Heartburn and headache
  • Insomnia

With easy-to-understand charts, graphs, and tables throughout, Natural Alternatives to Over-the-Counter and Prescription Drugs offers detailed, practical information that will help readers live a fuller, healthier life—free from pharmaceutical medicines.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780688166274
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date: 12/16/1998
Pages: 384
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.25(h) x 0.96(d)

About the Author

Michael T. Murray, N.D., teaches at Bastyr University in Seattle, Washington. In addition to practicing medicine, he is the author of fourteen books, including A Textbook of Natural Medicine. He lives in Bellevue, Washington.

Michael T. Murray, N.D., teaches at Bastyr University in Seattle, Washington. In addition to practicing medicine, he is the author of fourteen books, including A Textbook of Natural Medicine. He lives in Bellevue, Washington.

Read an Excerpt

Making Medicine or Making Money

The United States spends more money on health care than any country in the world. For 1994, the projection is that the total will exceed one trillion dollars. Despite this tremendous financial commitment, are Americans getting their money's worth? If so, why is the United States ranked sixteenth in terms of life expectancy and why are there more people in nursing homes in this country than anywhere else in the world? Where is all this money spent on health care going? Are drug companies and doctors more concerned about making money than making people healthy?

Since the 1950s, the drug industry has been the most profitable industry in America. In December 1959, the last year of the Eisenhower administration, the Senate Subcommittee on Antitrust and Monopoly heralded a year-long investigation of the drug industry with the declaration that the public was not only being overcharged for drugs, but was being ripped off by more than $250 million a year for useless and sometimes harmful medicines. The drug industry was harshly criticized for its unrestricted promotional, marketing, and pricing practices.

Have things changed in the last thirty-five years? Yes, they have gotten much better for the drug companies at the public's expense. During the past thirty-five years, drug costs have skyrocketed at a rate four times that of inflation. In 1960, the drug industry was the most profitable industry in America, with a profit margin of 10.6 percent of sales. By 1992, this had increased to 13 percent.

In 1980, the average prescription cost was $6.52. In 1992, the cost of the same prescription was $22.50. Since 1980, prescription drug costshave risen nearly three times higher than the consumer price index. Projections are that drug costs will continue to rise at a rate of nearly 10 percent per year for the next few years. Some drugs will see rises even steeper. Not surprisingly, the drugs most likely to rise in cost are those in highest demand among aging baby-boomers. For example, Premarin, a drug used primarily in women around the time of menopause, is being prescribed more. In 1985, the price of one hundred tablets of Premarin was $13.34; in 1991, the price had increased by nearly 2.5 times that amount to $33.09.

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Natural Alternatives to Over-the-Counter and Prescription Drugs 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book, among many others, has helped me realize that my true calling is to become an N.D. There was a major crisis in my family and this book helped to point us in the right direction. It is, in my opinion, a 'life-saver'.