My Ántonia (Collins Classics)

My Ántonia (Collins Classics)

by Willa Cather

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780008322786
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date: 09/19/2019
Series: Collins Classics
Sold by: HarperCollins Publishers
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 256
File size: 928 KB

About the Author

Born in Virginia, Willa Cather (1873-1948) moved with her family to Nebraska before she was ten, which later provided the setting for her best-known novels. The books O Pioneers! and My Antonia, especially, with their focus on immigrant life on the prairie, established Cather as a major American novelist.

Date of Birth:

December 7, 1873

Date of Death:

April 27, 1947

Place of Birth:

Winchester, Virginia

Place of Death:

New York, New York

Education:

B.A., University of Nebraska, 1895

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My Ántonia 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 82 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Not formatted properly and is completely unreadable !
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The book is not formatted properly and is therefore unreadable. It is better to go ahead and pay the $0.99 for the other version.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is not even a proper book it has ramon stuff and some of it is not even words! I think there trying to make you buy the 0.99 book
Bookmarque on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
While I didn¿t love this novel, I did like the way the story was told and the emotions it evoked. Living in the western US in the early 20th century was no picnic. I had to laugh at myself and pretty much everyone else in modern society for being such wimps. Antonia worked like a dog and actually liked it. She liked to work as hard as a man did and was restless and bored when she had to live in town. It wasn¿t just her, everyone worked themselves to death, but considered it their place; a higher calling even. They were pioneers and that was an amazing thing to them. Not everyone could be one; they were a people set apart. Out in the wilderness carving out civilization an acre at a time.Not all of it was terribly civil though. The attitudes and customs of the newer immigrants were treated with suspicion. In turn the immigrants distrusted the more established Americans and longed for the land they had left. I have to agree with someone in the novel who suggested that they go back if they found it to be so horrible. Instead, one kills himself out of despair rather than learn the language or adapt. It was the beginning of my phase of distaste and outright dislike for Antonia and the rest of her family. They were terrible neighbors and Jim¿s grandfather just took it and never taught them a lesson in how to get along. It was a phase though, and when Antonia and the rest of the family began to act like part of the community I fell back into my previous attitude toward her; puzzlement. I couldn¿t figure out why Jim (or anyone else) found her so beguilingly attractive. She wasn¿t to me. She was just an uneducated farm kid who became an uneducated mother to a herd of kids in the end. She didn¿t strike me as anyone special since 100s of other women were in the same position as she was. I didn¿t get it and so the story stayed distanced from me, like an old movie I know I¿m supposed to appreciate for its artful direction, dialog or photography, but one that just doesn¿t light me up inside. I can understand why others love My Antonia; it¿s very beautifully written and romantic, but it didn¿t reach me if you know what I mean. It stayed remote and untouchable. I couldn¿t help comparing it to The Angle of Repose by Wallace Stegner and how the story of those pioneering people really did reach me and I could easily imagine them as real people. Cather didn¿t bring that home to me with this novel. I can see why some would love it, I¿m just not one of them.
gmillar on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I really liked this. For a long time I shied away from the idea of it, and "O Pioneers", mostly because of my perception that the subject matter would be boring to me after I looked at the cover picture of nothing but wheat sheaves deep into a long, flat distance - boring picture really. But - the story start out grabbing my interest, as I was chewing on some tasty hash browns in McDonalds, by setting itself up in a present as two friends reminisced their Nebraska childhood. I read a lot of different, unconnected stuff but little of it is of this style. I found myself expecting surprises of a fantastic, raunchy and/or unbelievable proportions as the story built up to little climaxes in the lives of Jim, Lena, Tiny and Ántonia. It didn't happen that way. Each of those little climaxes finished in a refreshingly normal and realistic way - at least in the way of my growing up experiences. It was good to be kept in the realistic, as opposed to being bumped into the thrilling, for a change. The prose flowed beautifully. The descriptives were wonderful. I understand now why Willa Cather has been afforded such a high place in American literature. I will now go ahead and read "O Pioneers" when a copy drops into my lap again. I'll lay odds I'll enjoy that too.
devenish on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The story of Antonia Shimerda,a Bohemian emigrant,and Jim Burden,an American boy who befrends her. Beginning in their childhood when Jim teaches her to speak English and and one day when they are out together Jim manages to kill a huge snake which they both bring home in triumph. We follow them through their growing-up and into adult-hood and meet their many friends and members of their family.This is a story of ordinary people told in an extraordinary way. Once read it will never be forgotten.This is one of the few books of which one can truly say 'I am sorry this is finished'.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Timeless American classic, a picture window the past. This is a story of a immigrant girl and her family; it resonates today.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
She walks in wearing a red crop top and black leather skinny jeans with high tops she looks around and frowns knowing no one she runs a hand through her red hair and sighs
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Walks in. He's wearing green jeans, a Minecraft Creeper shirt and a dragon pendant.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Ha multip res go ro lego res 4
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Here!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This may be a great book. I have no idea. This version is unreadable
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Highly recommended
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Man_Of_La_Book_Dot_Com More than 1 year ago
My Ánto­nia by Willa Cather was writ­ten in 1918 and is con­sid­ered the last in the “Prairie Tril­ogy” fol­low­ing O Pio­neers! And The Song of the Lark. This book is con­sid­ered one of the great­est nov­els writ­ten by an American. Ánto­nia Shimerda’s story is told through the eyes of Jim Bur­den, a child­hood friend. Even though Jim left town, he never for­got the Bohemian girl who influ­enced, and still influ­ences his life from afar. Ánto­nia has always worked hard, first help­ing her par­ents farm in an unfriendly land and later to pre­serve though the hard­ships life throws at her. Ánto­nia always pre­vails with spirit that can­not be bro­ken, that of a pioneer. My Ánto­nia by Willa Cather is a story within a story. The nar­ra­tor is a friend of Jim who is stuck in a love­less mar­riage. Jim is con­sumed by a fan­tasy girl, Ánto­nia, who he remem­bers from childhood. The char­ac­ters in the book well writ­ten, real­is­tic but form a strange group, Ms. Cather does an amaz­ing job writ­ing a book from the per­spec­tive of a young man. To be hon­est, if I knew that this would be the case I prob­a­bly won’t have read the book to begin with. I’m always weary of sto­ries writ­ten from a per­spec­tive which the author can never per­ceive. Even though a man tells the story, this is not how a man would tell a story. The nar­ra­tive might be in the voice of a man, but it is a woman writ­ing as a man, with all the insights, gen­tle­ness and moti­va­tions which comes with it. While writ­ing from that per­spec­tive might not always work, this novel comes off as a real­is­tic fan­tasy of a mid­dle aged man, think­ing back on his life, the mis­takes he has made and what “could have been”. Ánto­nia seems to be the per­fect woman, told by an unre­li­able nar­ra­tor who remem­bers her with­out any faults. It’s as if you made con­tact with your high-school sweet­heart, decades after you saw one another and expect noth­ing to change. Jim puts Ánto­nia on a pedestal, the reader knows she’s not per­fect and the mis­takes, is lovely as they are, are still seen through rose col­ored glasses worn by a man who adores her but sim­ply doesn’t under­stand her. This is cer­tainly a book of qual­ity; Cather makes this char­ac­ter dri­ven novel come alive with her vivid descrip­tions of Nebraska. It seems that the char­ac­ters belong to each other as much as they belong to the land and to the Amer­i­can immi­grant lit­er­ary experience.
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