MTV Unplugged

MTV Unplugged

by Bob Dylan

CD

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Overview

This show, taped for MTV, finds Dylan turning in an 11-song set, with eight of the songs dating from his 1963-1967 heyday, including such standards as "The Times They Are A-Changin'" and "Like a Rolling Stone." ("John Brown," a powerful antiwar song from 1963, had not been released on a Dylan album previously.) The '70s are represented by "Knockin' on Heaven's Door," and the '80s by "Shooting Star" and "Dignity" (a trunk song, the studio version of which had emerged only the previous November on Bob Dylan's Greatest Hits, Vol. 3). Dylan, accompanied by a competent five-piece band, approaches his material in a gentler fashion than on some of the originals -- "The Times They Are A-Changin'" and "With God on Our Side," for example, seem sadder and less defiant than they did back in 1964. Otherwise, unlike some other Unplugged performances, this one doesn't offer a noticeably different view of the artist's work. But then, Dylan has been unplugged for much of his career, anyway.

Product Details

Release Date: 04/28/2009
Label: Sbme Special Mkts.
UPC: 0886974859024
catalogNumber: 748590
Rank: 15544

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MTV Unplugged 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
glauver More than 1 year ago
This mid 90s Bob Dylan concert album is a mixed bag. The title is slightly misleading; someone forgot to disconnect the B-3 Hammond organ. Actually, that was a good thing, because the music has a mid 60s sound reminiscent of Highway 61 or Blonde On Blonde. Bob's voice is all over the place. Sometimes he sounds pretty good and other times he seems to be mailing in the vocals. Tombstone Blues, All Along The Watchtower, and John Brown are highlights, Rainy Day Women and Knockin' On Heavens Door did not need these reprises but, surprisingly, I think the new arrangement of Desolation Row spices it up. Like A Rolling Stone has a lame start but Bob seems to become more animated toward the close. Live 1966 and Before The Flood are still the CDs to go to for prime live Dylan.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This recording is a must for any Dylan fan. Each cut is a strong, confident, mature performance of a pop music classic. Dylan reinterprets some of his best known work with the support of a group of solid music professionals. The result is a fresh look at several Dylan standards. Every cut is enjoyable, but, in particular, "Desolation Row" virtually brings tears with the true beauty of this performance, and "Like a Rolling Stone" is rendered in such a way as to solidify its position as one of the greatest songs ever written. All of this is done in front of a truly respectful and appreciative audience that never gets in the way as sometimes happens on live recordings. Above all else, Dylan is a troubador of creativity and inspiration who is best heard live. This recording captures that spirit extraordinarily well.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Dylan's M.T.V. Unplugged CD offers a hip, new version of such favorites as ''Like A Rolling Stone'' ''All Along the Watchtower'' and ''The Times They Are A Changin.'' Pretty up-beat and moving as always with Dylan.
WynSharp More than 1 year ago
Highly recommended. Tombstone Blues, the first song, is one of Dylan's earlier hits. He's older in this updated version and much stronger. I have both and prefer the latter. I play it on the way to class in the mornings, and it keeps me awake. I rock with it on the road, or my IPOD. I have to say, he's never written anything but the best ever. The man, the legend, his music and his dreams are the dreams of every fan, young or older generation. Buy the CD, it's a keeper. If you want to see him perform these songs then you know where to find the videos online. Awesome.
JohnQ More than 1 year ago
I have most of Dylan's albums but gave this one away as I just can't stand the "Mumble Era" of his concerts. This is one to ignore, especially when there are so many other truly great concert albums available.