Message to Garcia

Message to Garcia

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Overview

2010 Reprint of 1916 Edition. This famous inspirational essay, written during the Spanish-American War, has gone around the world and been translated into most modern languages. Soldiers have died on the field of battle with it in their knapsacks. Hubbard recounts a tale of heroism during the Spanish-American War. Still popular with army officers and employers for its message of "getting the job done." It has sold over 40 million copies. The essay is about an army lieutenant, Rowan, who is instructed by President Mckinley to find Garcia, the Cuban leader, and deliver a message into his hands. Also includes two other essays, "The Boy from Missouri Valley" and "Help Yourself by Helping the House."

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780937539651
Publisher: Tremendous Life Books
Publication date: 06/06/2002
Series: Life-Changing Classics Series , #3
Edition description: New Edition
Pages: 32
Sales rank: 120,022
Product dimensions: 4.00(w) x 6.50(h) x 0.10(d)

About the Author

Elbert Green Hubbard (1856 -1915) was an American writer, publisher, artist, and philosopher. He was an influential exponent of the Arts and Crafts movement and is, perhaps, most famous for his essay A Message to Garcia. Owing to his prolific publications, Hubbard was a renowned figure in his day. Contributors to a 360-page book published by Roycrofters and entitled In Memoriam: Elbert and Alice Hubbard included such luminaries as meat-packing magnate J. Ogden Armour, business theorist and Babson College founder Roger Babson, botanist and horticulturalist Luther Burbank, seed-company founder W. Atlee Burpee, ketchup magnate Henry J. Heinz, National Park Service founder Franklin Knight Lane, success writer Orison Swett Marden, inventor of the modern comic strip Richard F. Outcault, poet James Whitcomb Riley, Nobel Peace Prize recipient Elihu Root, evangelist Billy Sunday, political leader Booker T. Washington, and poet Ella Wheeler Wilcox. Hubbard is an ancestor of singer Brodie Foster Hubbard. Another book which was written by Mr. Hubbard is entitled "Health and Wealth". It was published in 1908 and includes many short truisms that are in line with the Truth movement and Transcendentalists concerning using intelligence to rid one of fear and, thus, to bring the body back to health and happiness which leads to true wealth through service to others.

Table of Contents

Elbert Hubbard wrote this in one hour after supper. Its management advice is both timeless and provocative. In the 111 years since it was written, more than 40 million copies have been distributed.

Customer Reviews

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Message to Garcia 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 35 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
As a Marine Major attending the Army's Command and General Staff College, I mentioned this title to my Army colleagues in a phrase that I've heard asked to many a subordinate officer over the years. The rhetorical question is more of a reminder than a query and I've had it posed to me as 2nd Lt in the simple phrase: 'Message to Garcia, Lieutenant?'. I was surprised to find that out of my class of 18 Army, Air Force, and Navy Officers, only a couple of them had heard of Elbert Hubbard's 'A Message to Garcia'. The basic tenets of initiative, self reliance, and commanders intent are set forth in this essay and it is required reading for brand new Marine Lieutenants in the Basic School and OCS (at least when I went through). I still read this from time to time to remind myself of its lessons. I also discuss it with my subordinate Officers on their initial counseling sessions. I would highly recommend this to all junior officers in the military as well as those recent business school graduates embarking upon a career in the corporate world. The lessons of ¿A Message to Garcia¿ apply across all services and occupations.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I enjoy reading this a lot. I understand why it is a classic! In the end it is about getting the job done period, no and ifs or but, get it done.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Great Little book for building a good foundation in your life. this book is not for the people that only think of themselves. this is a old book that is used to be handed out to workers. one of the top ten most produced books in the world.
Guest More than 1 year ago
When taken literally, I suppose it could be interpreted as a 'thinly-veiled anti-labor screed,' but like any teaching document (e.g., the Bible), one should focus on the broader lessons within the stories. It is a fact of real life that s/he who accepts full accountability for accomplishing some great responsibility is always preferred by a strong leader than someone who needs constant care and feeding to get the task done. A job of the modern leader (in business, combat, the clergy, or whatever) is to accomplish much through delegation to strong team members. The lesson of this book is not that Hubbard hated the working man. It is that leaders need followers that take charge in accomplishing an assigned goal. This age-old lesson in no way conflicts with modern business or combat leadership practices. Far from being a 'dinosaur of old laissez-faire capitalism,' this timeless story teaches that leaders want goals accomplished, and don't want to have to tell followers HOW to accomplish that goal ... but in order to be able to do that, they need highly-skilled, highly autonomous followers. Yup ... every organization has its 'unthinking elements' .. this book doesn't hold them up as virtuous.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I wish I knew a way to fix the text. Parts are difficult to read because of jumbled words. The story itself is interesting to reflect on. I see why its required reading on the Commandant's reading list.
Guest More than 1 year ago
To say that this book promotes mindless followers is to say that you haven't bothered to read it. Taking into context Laissez-faire attitudes of businesses at the turn of the 20th century is fine. However, it is important to remember what time period we now live in. In today's day and age the followers that you lead need to be able to act independently and this book is a great tool to train them. It brings home the point that as a follower you can and are expected to be able to accomplish your task with nothing but the intent of your leader. This is absolutely a great lesson for everyone who reads it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Understood!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great message in a world of finishing ribbons and "deserved" people.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
K
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Read and reread this glorious piece.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Pads in.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Wow, after reading some of these reviews I was expecting some grandiose credo spelling out the dangers of "blindly following" orders. I think perhaps people that gave this very short story bad reviews are uncomfortable in reading about themselves. This little pamphlet is nothing more than an ah ha moment EH had one night. He says as much in the beginning. In my 53 years of life I have to completely agree with the final analysis og Msg to Garcia.....to truly be free comes with great responsibility....deal with it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A good book, I feel it has a positive message, that anyone in the workforce, can benefit from it.
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It made the new Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff's Reading List...can't think of a better endorsement.
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