Magic's Promise (Last Herald Mage Series #2) (Turtleback School & Library Binding Edition)

Magic's Promise (Last Herald Mage Series #2) (Turtleback School & Library Binding Edition)

by Mercedes Lackey, M. Lackey

Hardcover(Library Binding - THIS EDITION IS INTENDED FOR USE IN SCHOOLS AND LIBRARIES ONLY)

$18.40
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Overview

With King Randale stricken by a mysterious illness and the powerful Herald-Mage Vanyel at the end of his strength, a neighboring kingdom is threatened by a magical holocaust.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780613630559
Publisher: Turtleback Books
Publication date: 07/01/2003
Series: Valdemar: The Last Herald Mage Series , #2
Edition description: THIS EDITION IS INTENDED FOR USE IN SCHOOLS AND LIBRARIES ONLY
Pages: 320
Product dimensions: 4.30(w) x 6.80(h) x 1.10(d)
Age Range: 12 - 17 Years

About the Author

Mercedes Ritchie Lackey is an American writer of fantasy novels. Many of her works are interlinked and set in the world of Velgarth, mostly in and around the country of Valdemar. She is also the author of the Dragon Jousters series and the Tales of the Five Hundred Kingdoms books, including The Fairy Godmother and Fortune’s Fool. Lackey is also a professional lyricist and a licensed wild bird rehabilitator. She lives in Oklahoma with her husband and collaborator, artist Larry Dixon, and their flock of parrots.

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Magic's Promise (Last Herald Mage Series #2) 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 136 reviews.
Bibliotropic on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The Last Herald-Mage trilogy continues with this second novel, in which Vanyel has accepted his responsibilities as a Herald and has aged, not only in years but also in experience. Gone is the whiny and insecure teenager we knew from the previous book, replaced by an older and wiser man, one who has seen far too many battles, and far too many dear friends fall in the line of duty.We have, in short, someone who's quite earned his chance to be a nervous wreck.What starts off in a fairly boring way (Vanyel returning to his family home for a rest) quickly gets the action going when he and his Companion receive an urgent call for help, and quickly get embroiled in a murder investigation, political and magical assassination, and something that, improperly handled, could devestate more than two countries with a spectacularly large and magically-triggered earthquake.Business as usual, then.When I'd first read this series, I was much younger, in my teens, and this book was my least favourite of the trilogy. Now I find myself liking it a lot more, partially because I can relate a little more to the adult that Vanyel has become. While this doesn't necessarily say much for Lackey's ability to convey characters well to any age group, it does speak well for her ability to create characters that readers of certain age groups can relate to.If there's anything that really grated on me while reading this, it was Vanyel's identity crisis. He goes through a period of not being able to figure out if he's really homosexual or just happened to hall in love with a man. Which, on its own, may sound like a wise thing to ponder, but half the time, the way he went about it made me want to smack him on the head. Consider the time he's in disguise and is being pawed at by a rather despicable woman, who turns his stomach, and then is hit on by a creepy man who gives him the same reaction. He spends the next few pages wondering why, if he's really gay, didn't he just give in to the man hitting on him, and if he's not gay, why doesn't he just sleep with the woman the way she wants. And it took him over half the book to figure out, "Oh right, being gay doesn't mean I'll automatically hop into bed with every single male I come across." Admittedly, he chastises himself for forgetting then what he knew so well when he was young, that sex and love are different things and that he prefers love, or at least affection, to go along with sex, but still. Hearing him debate over and over again whether or not he's really gay just wore on my nerves after a while, and it got frustrating to read.I still enjoyed the book, following along with the murder mystery and piecing together little clues myself (that's the fun of reading about mysteries, after all), but frankly, this book could have been cut from the trilogy without affecting the main plot very much. It's good for building character, for tying up some minor loose ends, for introducing a character or two that will play minor parts later on, but aside from emotional healing, it doesn't play a very large part in Vanyel's story. More could have been written about him battles on the Karsite border, I think, and have been more important to the plot of the trilogy as a whole.
LisaMaria_C on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I loved Lackey's Herald series set in Valdemar from the first set of books that began with Arrows of the Queen. This set of three, however, thought published after, is set centuries before, so you need not start with those, and I think this set of three is the strongest among those novels she wrote--so you only need read the preceding book, Magic's Pawn. This protagonist of this book, Vanyel, is gay--unusual in fantasy even now. In this book he returns home and deals with some unsettled business. I like the arc not just of Vanyel but those he grew up with in this book that we saw in the previous novel. Lackey has been criticized for her black and white characterizations--this book is rather unusual for redeeming an unsympathetic character in the first book, Jarvis. I liked that, and the friendships Vanyel forms here. And this is, above all, a good action-adventure fantasy read.
van_stef on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I love Vanyel's character and this is my favorite book in the trilogy.
patnelsonchilds on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Am Utterly Engrossing Series!I picked up this series because I was in the process of writing a fantasy novel with a gay hero and I wanted to see what other works were out there. I had never read Ms. Lackey's work, so I didn't know what to expect. I was not just pleasantly surprised by this trilogy, I was completely captivated by it and very sad when I reached the final page. The plot is interesting and the pace is quick. The characters, especially the hero Vanyel, are extremely sympathetic, primarily due to the fact that they are so flawed. Some may find the romance a bit sappy, but I'm the first to admit that I dig that kind of thing and you'll see it in my own novels as well.Orphan's Quest (Chronicles of Firma, Book One) Best of all for me, though, was the fact that although her hero is unapologetically gay, the series does not become mired in its "gayness" as so many other works of gay-themed fiction I have read. This trilogy gave me a great deal of inspiration to push on with my own fantasy aspirations. I owe Misty a big hug if we ever meet face to face. I highly recommend these three books. Whether you're gay or straight, you'll find them an excellent read and, like me, you'll be sorry to reach that last page.
Jenson_AKA_DL on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
In this story, taking place 12 years after the end of the previous book, Vanyel returns to Haven after taking the place of 5 other mages on the front lines to save Valdemar from the denizens of dark magic. However, when Yfandes and Vanyel respond to an urgent call for help from a young, untrained mage and his companion from across the border they become embroiled in an international incident that could bring Vanyel's family to the cusp of war, just when he's actually starting to like them.My biggest complaint here is the leap in time. Although we learn much of Vanyel's life as he grew from the teenage, newly-made Herald-Mage of the first book it seems as though he had a great many adventures that might have been book-worthy. Certainly there are a great many surprises that come up during this story of things Vanyel accomplished during this in-between time. The other thing I had difficulty with is all the characters. I totally couldn't keep up with who was who and there is an important scene at the end with the character, Jaysen, who sounded familiar but I had no real clue who the person was. Outside of that this fantasy was very interesting. There is lots of action and lots of soul searching on Vanyel's part who, despite the intervening years, continues to have many of the issues that plagued him at the end of the first book. I also liked the fact that he learned to let go of his grudges and accept people previously vilified in his life. Overall I did enjoy it despite my character confusion and I will be reading the last book of this trilogy.
SunnySD on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The sequel to Magic's Pawn finds Vanyel worn thin and exhausted from a too-long stint on the Karsite border taking the place of not one, but five Herald-mages. Valdemar's plight is dire, with a fast-sickening king and ill-luck stalking his Herald-mages. But Vanyel is due a rest, and plans to take it in the bosom of his family - although he knows just how restful he'll find it: not at all.But all is not peaceful across the border, and before Vanyel can fully regain his lost reserves he's sucked into a plot that may cause a new flare-up on the border, stretching himself and Valdemar's already strained resources to the breaking point.Vanyel always seems to be stretched too thin - and he's still whiny, but showing improvement. The second installment is more better than the first.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The last Herald mage series will always be my fav. So intracate, such depth it envelopes you. not only can you not put it down you don't see what's coming
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This story is so tragic and moving. I don't cry at much but dammit if Ms. Lackey didn't make my eyes mist up more than thrice while reading this book. Thank you for creating a gay character who isn't defined entirely by his sexuality and for portraying the actual (incorrect) assumption people STILL have about gay men and young boys. The characters are multifaceted and flawed which keeps them interesting and the dialogue is quick witted. I was first introduced to the Valdemar Universe with Darian's tale and look forward to reading many more chapters. THANK YOU!!!
KikiD870 More than 1 year ago
This book takes up long after the end of Magic's Pawn and Vanyel is exhuasted by the wild magic and trauma that he has been through. He is almost an entirely different person in this book, changed and matured with the experiences of his past. As much as I loved the first book, I think I love Vanyel as a character even more in this book. Over the years, he has become everything he was meant to be... and all of the things his father would never have imagined. He is a hero of Valdemar and has dedicated his life to keeping its people safe, even at his own expense. He is told to take some leave to rest and recuperate and goes to the most unlikely place,... Askevron Manor. But it isn't long before he realizes that there are things happening just beyond the borders that threaten everything. Once again, I think Vanyel and his circumstances are universally relatable. I love Vanyel and I love his story. He is such a sympathetic character so it is easy to root for him throughout the story. Even after everything he has done for the kingdom, his parents still can't see him for who he is. His father is still dismissive and his mother is still throwing her ladies at him. And as a person, despite all that he has been through, he still has so much to learn about life, love, and moving forward after grief. This book also answered a lot of questions about some characters from the first book, particularly the family priest and the weaponsmaster. They were extraordinarily hateful in the first book with no real explanation as to why that was so extreme. As with the other books, this one is full of twists and turns and intrigue. I think that there is an added level of suspense in this particular book because Vanyel is, as the series title suggests, the last of his kind. He is the last Herald-Mage. So much rides on him and there are moments when you wonder, even knowing there is another book in the trilogy, if he is going to survive. My Recommendation: I highly recommend this series if you love high fantasy and rich, relatable characters! This review originally posted on my blog The Caffeinated Diva reads.
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Jcross85 More than 1 year ago
Great sequel to one of the best books of all time.
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jslJS More than 1 year ago
Excellent
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