Magic: An Anthology of the Esoteric and Arcane

Magic: An Anthology of the Esoteric and Arcane

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Overview

This amazing collection of new fiction has an extrordinary list of contributors, it is the very first commercial collection to feature an original short story from the international no.1 bestseller Audrey Niffenegger, author of The Time Traveller's Wife; features alongside the NYT Bestseller Dan Abnett and more bestselling authors such as Christopher Fowler, Storm Constantine and many more.

Niffenegger says: "I'm delighted to be involved in this project. My story is called The Wrong Fairie and is about Charles Altamont Doyle. He was a Victorian artist who was institutionalized for alcoholism. He was also the father of Arthur Conan Doyle, and he believed in fairies."

They gather in darkness, sharing ancient and arcane knowledge as they manipulate the very matter of reality itself. Spells and conjuration; legerdemain and prestidigitation – these are the mistresses and masters of the esoteric arts. Magic comes alive in their hands. British Fantasy Award nominee, Jonathan Oliver, gathers together sixteen stories of magic, featuring some of today’s finest practitioners, including Audrey Niffenegger, Christopher Fowler, Gail Z. Martin, Gemma Files, Thana Niveau, Robert Shearman, Will Hill, Sarah Lotz, Storm Constantine, Dan Abnett, Sophia McDougall, Alison Littlewood and Lou Morgan. "This is a spellbinding collection, and ideal reading for a season that lives and dies by its surprises." — Tor.com

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781781080542
Publisher: Rebellion
Publication date: 11/06/2012
Edition description: Original
Pages: 288
Sales rank: 718,614
Product dimensions: 5.00(w) x 7.70(h) x 0.80(d)

About the Author

Audrey Niffenegger, author of The Time Traveller’s Wife, has sold millions of books across the world.
Dan Abnett is one of the most popluar authors in SF.
Christopher Fowler is a hugely successful crime and horror novelist.

Jonathan Oliver is the Editor-in-Chief of Solaris and Abaddon Books, the author of two novels in Abaddon's Twilight of Kerberos series. He is the editor of critcally applauded short story anthologies End of the Line and House of Fear.

Hometown:

Chicago, Illinois

Date of Birth:

June 13, 1963

Place of Birth:

South Haven, Michigan

Education:

B.F.A., School of the Art Institute of Chicago, 1985; M.F.A., Northwestern University, 1991

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Magic: An Anthology of the Esoteric and Arcane 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Beauty_in_Ruins More than 1 year ago
Edited by Jonathan Oliver, Magic: An Anthology of the Esoteric and Arcane brings together a wide (and surprising) variety of authors from across the world, and across the genre shelves. Advertised as a "perfect read for Hallowe’en and the long autumn evenings ahead," it went right to the top of the review pile when I was fortunate enough to snag an early paperback review copy. This is a very dark, very grim collection of tales. It's also a very efficient collection, with some stories approaching the point of abruptness with their brevity. The Wrong Fairy, by Audrey Niffenegger, open the anthology with a tale of magic and insanity that's interesting, but which never quite manages to set its hooks in the reader. It's If I Die, Kill My Cat, by Sarah Lotz that really kicks the anthology off, succeeding as both a character piece and as a tale of magic. Shuffle, by Will Hill, was a stumbling block for me (likely due to my boredom with card tricks), but Domestic Magic, by Steve Rasnic Tem and Melanie Tem, really uped the ante with its tale of magic-fused (or, perhaps, excused) parental neglect. Neither Cad Coddeu, by Liz Williams, nor Party Tricks, by Dan Abnett, made much of an impression on me, despite the authors being near the top of my must-read pile. First and Last and Always, by Thana Niveau, however, more than renewed my interest with its fascinating tale of gothic horror, while . The Art of Escapology, by Alison Littlewood, put an interesting twist on reader expectations with its tale of childish obsessions and mature possessions. The Baby, by Christopher Fowler, was perhaps the most disturbing tale of the lot, adding a supernatural edge to an already controversial subject. Do as Thou Wilt..., by Storm Constantine, was another story that failed to make an impression, despite coming from an author I admire significantly. Bottom Line, by Lou Morgan, and MailerDaemon, by Sophia McDougall, round out a rather soft centre, succeeding to intrigue, but falling short of entertaining. Fortunately, Buttons, by Gail Z. Martin comes along to redeem things with what was, by far, the strongest tale in the anthology for me. Nanny Grey, by Gemma Files, would have been a perfect tale with which to end things, a cruel, dark, and mysterious tale of magical deception that left me all-but cackling with glee. Dumb Lucy, by Robert Shearman, isn't a bad tale, but it suffers from heightened expectations due as much to its place at the end of the collection as its proximity to two of the strongest tales in the collection. Creative, original, and even inspired (at times), Magic truly is An Anthology of the Esoteric and Arcane. No matter your tastes regarding what magic is, or your expectations as to what magic should be, odds are there's something here that will cast its spell over you and make the hours just . . . disappear.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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