Lysistrata (Illustrated and Annotated)

Lysistrata (Illustrated and Annotated)

by Aristophanes

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Overview

Lysistrata is a comedy by Aristophanes. First performed in classical Athens in , it is a comic account of one woman's extraordinary mission to end the Peloponnesian War. Lysistrata persuades the women of Greece to withhold sexual privileges from their husbands and lovers as a means of forcing the men to negotiate peace â?? a strategy, however, that inflames the battle between the sexes. The play is notable for being an early exposé of sexual relations in a male-dominated society. The dramatic structure represents a shift away from the conventions of Old Comedy, a trend typical of the author's career. It was produced in the same year as Thesmophoriazusae, another play with a focus on gender-based issues, just two years after Athens' catastrophic defeat in the Sicilian Expedition.

This edition has formatted for your reader, with an active table of contents. It has also been extensively illustrated and annotated, with additional information about the play and its author, including an overview, plot, background, discussion, relation to old comedy, influence, legacy, biographical and bibliographical information.

Product Details

BN ID: 2940151255158
Publisher: Bronson Tweed Publishing
Publication date: 03/03/2015
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Sales rank: 885,594
File size: 5 MB

About the Author

Aristophanes, son of Philippus, of the deme Cydathenaeum, was a comic playwright of ancient Athens. Eleven of his thirty dramas survive virtually complete. These, together with fragments of some of his other plays, provide the only real examples of a genre of comic drama known as Old Comedy, and they are used to define the genre. Also known as the Father of Comedy and the Prince of Ancient Comedy, Aristophanes has been said to recreate the life of ancient Athens more convincingly than any other author. His powers of ridicule were feared and acknowledged by influential contemporaries; Plato singled out Aristophanes' play The Clouds as slander that contributed to the trial and subsequent condemning to death of Socrates although other satirical playwrights had also caricatured the philosopher. His second play, The Babylonians (now lost), was denounced by the demagogue Cleon as a slander against the Athenian polis. It is possible that the case was argued in court but details of the trial are not recorded and Aristophanes caricatured Cleon mercilessly in his subsequent plays, especially The Knights, the first of many plays that he directed himself. "In my opinion," he says through the Chorus in that play, "the author-director of comedies has the hardest job of all."

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