Lunch in Paris: A Love Story, with Recipes

Lunch in Paris: A Love Story, with Recipes

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Overview

In Paris for a weekend visit, Elizabeth Bard sat down to lunch with a handsome Frenchman—and never went home again.

Was it love at first sight? Or was it the way her knife slid effortlessly through her pavé au poivre, the steak'spink juices puddling into the buttery pepper sauce? LUNCH IN PARIS is a memoir about a young American woman caught up in two passionate love affairs—one with her new beau, Gwendal, the other with French cuisine. Packing her bags for a new life in the world's most romantic city, Elizabeth is plunged into a world of bustling open-air markets, hipster bistros, and size 2 femmes fatales. She learns to gut her first fish (with a little help from Jane Austen), soothe pangs of homesickness (with the rise of a chocolate soufflé) and develops a crush on her local butcher (who bears a striking resemblance to Matt Dillon). Elizabeth finds that the deeper she immerses herself in the world of French cuisine, the more Paris itself begins to translate. French culture, she discovers, is not unlike a well-ripened cheese-there may be a crusty exterior, until you cut through to the melting, piquant heart.

Peppered with mouth-watering recipes for summer ratatouille, swordfish tartare and molten chocolate cakes, Lunch in Paris is a story of falling in love, redefining success and discovering what it truly means to be at home. In the delicious tradition of memoirs like A Year in Provence and Under the Tuscan Sun, this book is the perfect treat for anyone who has dreamed that lunch in Paris could change their life.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781452608686
Publisher: Tantor Media, Inc.
Publication date: 07/30/2012
Edition description: Unabridged CD
Product dimensions: 6.40(w) x 5.30(h) x 1.10(d)

About the Author

Elizabeth Bard is an American journalist based in Paris. She has written about art, travel and digital culture for The New York Times, The International Herald Tribune, Wired, Time Out and The Huffington Post. She makes a mean chocolate soufflé.

What People are Saying About This

Adriana Trigiani

"Lunch in Paris has got it all: romance in full on the front burner with delicious French recipes for sustenance. Elizabeth Bard's voice is filled with lust and longing-it's Eat, Stay, Love with a side of spiced apricots."--(Adriana Trigiani, bestselling author of Very Valentine)
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From the Publisher

"She pleasantly details her joys and obstacles . . . provides poignant revelations about cultural differences. . . . A cozy, touching story." —-Kirkus

Nani Power

"As charming and coquettish as Paris itself, Lunch in Paris reawakens our tired hearts and palates with a deliciously passionate journey through the city of lights. Be prepared to be seduced by french kisses, the richest chocolate, and the sweet charm of Bard's prose."--(Nani Power, author of Crawling at Night and Feed the Hungry)\

Giulia Melucci

"Elizabeth Bard's Lunch in Paris is delicious, romantic, and sexy, just as the title indicates. What captivates you is the story of a woman finding herself after she finds love, and the challenge that entails. I devoured this book with all the gusto I would bring to a plate of steak tartare with pommes frites."--(Giulia Melucci, author of I Loved, I Lost, I Made Spaghetti)
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Customer Reviews

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Lunch in Paris 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 157 reviews.
SpecialKi25 More than 1 year ago
When I was walking through B&N about a week ago this book caught my eye because of its title. So I picked it up and boy am I glad I did! It was wonderful! It takes you through Elizabeth's journey with her boyfriend Gwendal and the love that blossoms between them. At the end of each chapter she includes recipes (most of which are talked about within that particular chapter) and let me tell you, this book make me hungry for more. I am anxious to try the recipes out! This would be an excellent choice for anyone who loves to cook and for those who just enjoy a good love story. It is a memoir that reads like a novel at times. Very well written =)
poosie More than 1 year ago
This is a book that delivers on so many levels. There is the exploration of cultural differences between the US and France, a love story, a toss up love for French cuisine and a man. "Ooh La La!!" Lunch in Paris tells the true story of a young woman in her mid-twenties who falls in love in Paris. Over eight years she progresses from the plague of self-doubt to a mature woman who finally reaches self-acceptance and comes to the realization that what she wants is not always what she needs. Just delicious!! If you love this one, you'll adore EXPLOSION IN PARIS!!
EcogreeNicole More than 1 year ago
After recently becoming obsessed with the whole idea of France, food, language, lifestyle. I picked up this book expecting to inhale every ingredient and become completely engulfed in French cuisine. Her recipes, her reasons, her descriptions of every detail and moment during this book are exactly that. However this book was more to me. This story was not only about the food, but I found myself identifying with the writers emotions about expectation for life and love. Her plan, she made for herself. The difference between what is important and what we MAKE important. This book is perfect when you are ready for a reminder, that the equation for happiness is simple and it doesn't come from money, success, etc.
hottieNJ More than 1 year ago
The preparation and consumption of food in Paris is planned and savored in much the same way women in America set out to buy the perfect pair of shoes. There are oohs and aahs through out Elizabeth's journey and discovery of the processes involved in cooking. The jaunts to specific stores and markets for certain items, and the need and love of the french language are all mixed and blended to perfection in this colorful and filling memoir. You'll want to book a trip to Paris or at least try several of these recipes.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I found the book to be entertaining and loved the references to different locations in Paris. I was in Paris with my then 16 year old granddaughter, Lea last year and she fell in love with Paris and wants to marry a french man. She is now reading this book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Wow. This was beautiful. One of the best travel memoirs I have read. If you are interesting in Paris, are a foodie, love French Culture or just want to read something enchanting: read this. I really hope the author continues on with a second book.
Buongiorno More than 1 year ago
I truly enjoyed this book and return to it again and again. It's honest, funny, and captivating. A pleasant book to just enjoy before cooking an excellent meal from one of her recipes. 
boardutah More than 1 year ago
Paris: What girl doesn't love Paris? Elizabeth Bard does an extraordinary job in creating a read that envelopes all the best of Paris and the delicious aspects of her own personal boulangarie--love this book. 
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love memoirs that involve living abroad. This was a quick easy read with a sweet story. I enjoyed the characters and after finishing the book...i found myself wanting more.
CrazyJosephineDavolo More than 1 year ago
This book is an easy read of the story of an American woman who falls in love with a Frenchman and moves to Paris. It is a cute book with some decent recipes--they recipes are simple so I would suggest if you are interested in French home cooking--try a couple of the recipes in the book. I was a little put off by the aoli recipe as it was not made with garlic. Maybe in Brittany they don't make aoli with garlic, but in the South they do. I'm just being nit-picky. Miss Bard has a nice way of writing--but I kinda feel that she is, as the French translation is.."looking down at her belly button"--she appears to be quite full of herself at times. Perhaps it is just the tone of the book. If you are going to Paris for the first time, this is a nice plane read--or a nice beach read. If you are *really* interested in reading what it is like having a Frenchman as your S/O, though, read "Almost French"--that book is definitely spot on. My fiance is a Frenchman and I can tell you "Almost French" had me falling off the sofa laughing. This book isn't as funny b/c Ms. Bard seems to take herself too seriously. Just my opinion--the book is still a cute read.
RubyGirl12 More than 1 year ago
I really enjoyed A Lunch in Paris, and certainly fueled my desire to visit the City of Lights. If you love to travel or love food, this is a great book. The recipes are actually pretty good, and I am planning on trying a few out here soon.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I loved this book. Well I'm not quite finished with it yet but I really do enjoy it. I love the main character's personality. This is usually the kind of books I read so finding another one was exciting :)
MotherLodeBeth More than 1 year ago
This lovely book is worth the price for the recipes alone. Ms. Bard has a wonderful, engaging writing style that if you sit real quiet as you read the book you will feel as if you are there like a fly on the wall. Imagine what a Paris restaurant should look like with that special handsome man whose hair hits his collar and one stand on top that has a wayward look, and so so sexy. Now picture a cute American woman who is extremely observant and has the right degree of vulnerability and you have a wonderful story before you. When she writes of the calls home to Mom when good bad and scary things have happened, you can almost hear her voice as she speaks. Or sense the glee when she tries a new improved way of making French Onion Soup. I tend to think of someone like Audrey Hepbrun or an Audrey Tautou when I picture this young author. The various chapters are all such a delight to read. From Coffee Tea or Me, And Affair To Remember, April in Paris, A Birthday Celebration, Pixie Dust, Vocabulary Lessons, Fig Fest 2002, The Long Winter, Meet The Parents, Family Heirlooms, Big Band Smelly Cheese, Family Values, The Circle Line, After The Fairytale the Parsnip, How to Make Cheesecake in a Pâté Pan, Forever in France, Ladies who Lunch, Comfort Food, Conquering the World, When New Yorkers Come to Visit, Spring Thinking, A New Years Feast, Next Year in Paris.
Heart2Heart More than 1 year ago
Lunch In Paris by Elizabeth Bard, finds Ms. Bard,in Paris for a weekend visit, where she sits down for lunch with a handsome Frenchman - and never goes home again. Was it love at first sight? Or was it the way her knife slid effortlessly through her pave' au poivre, the steak's pink juices puddling in the buttery pepper sauce? Lunch in Paris by Elizabeth Bard, is a memoir abut a young American woman caught up in two passionate love affairs - one with her new beau, Gwendal, the other with French cuisine. After packing her bags to begin a new life in the most romantic of cities, Bard is plunged into a world of bustling open-air markets, hipster bistros, and size-two femmes fatales. She learns how to gut a fish (with a little help from Jane Austen) and soothe pangs of homesickness (with the rise of a chocolate souffle') and she develops a crush on her local butcher (who bears a striking resemblance to Matt Dillon). This book is an amazing read for anyone who has longed for the desire to just pick up, leave and move to Paris! Woven wonderfully at the end of each chapter are the most amazing recipes of everything from appetizers to main courses, to "death by chocolate" desserts! What more could woman ask for a cook book and love story all in one! I received this complimentary amazing book courtesy of Hachette Book Groups to review. If you would love to know more about this book, the author or even where to purchase a copy of this heartwarming book, simply click on the link below. http://www.hachettebookgroup.com/books_9780316042789.htm Trust me this is the perfect book to read over Spring Break, summer vacation or while you are having your favorite Starbucks beverage and croissant!
nooklove More than 1 year ago
Delicious read. Elizabeth tells her story of love for her man, his country and the amazing French cuisine we all love. I loved her humor as well as the scrumptious recipes she includes.
Frisbeesage More than 1 year ago
Lunch in Paris is Elizabeth Bard's memoir of falling in love with a Frenchman over a pave au poivre for lunch. As the relationship advances she moves to Paris and encounters all the typical, but somehow never tiresome, dilemmas of an American in Paris. Like many before her she also falls in love with the culinary scene, discovering butchers and bakeries, markets and chic, little, sidewalk cafes. The recipes are doable and sound delicious - especially Pork Tenderloin with Four Kinds of Apples and Gwendal's Quick and Dirty Chocolate Souffle. The second half of the book delves deeper into what it really means to live in another country. I really enjoyed Bard's insight into managing relationships with in-laws ( on both sides), forming truly meaningful new friendships, sadly navigating the health care system, and making career decisions. Her careful, detailed look at the differences between the two cultures not only made me appreciate France more, it taught me a little bit more of what it means to be an American. This was a fun, easy read with more meat on its bones than I expected.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
LavendarBlue on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Awesome book. Makes me want to live, and eat, in Paris. Included at the end of every chapter are a few recipes and the few that I've made have turned out very well. A good book and good food. Double yum!
bibliophile.brouhaha on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
"When I spotted him at a seminar on a hypertext version of Finnegan's Wake, I knew he had to be European." So begins Elizabeth Bard's attraction to a future lover in her 2010 offering Lunch in Paris: A Love Story, with Recipes. The man in question happens not only to be European, but French to boot. What follows is a witty and well-written chronicle of a relationship with that man, his culture, family, and, of course, the food.I am sure many of us have been nervous about meeting a significant other's family, but I could not imagine a trial by edible fire. Love is indeed the stuff of bloody meat and smelly cheese in France, and for an American girl looking for a love to last, she will face many obstacles on her way to sitting at that table. The relationship is chronicled by food, but not in an overbearingly obvious manner; particular dishes make appearances in each chapter the same way a beloved cousin or grown-up sibling pops in to say hello. Like the food itself, these eating rituals (along with family and social etiquette) add texture and culture in a way that fascinates Bard and also makes her wonder what her true role is and where her place in the world lies. Bard struggles with her identity as an individual - the person she always planned on being has not just made a right turn, but at times, the road to that very definite vision has disappeared completely. Mix that in with moderate discussions of U.S. vs French viewpoints on everything from grocery shopping to career planning, it is little wonder that Bard did not flee for the kindness of her homebase of New York City at times. Particularly poignant to me on a personal level are recollections of her father and commentary on her mother. Like Bard's, my parents are divorced, and very often, I caught myself nodding in agreement when she made certain observations. The good thing about being an adult is that you start seeing your parents as people; the bad thing is that you start seeing them as people. It's a catch-22 that is confounded further by painful memories. This book is wonderfully written, although things get tied up rather quickly in the end. I would recommend it for any woman looking for a good 'real' love story that's built on equal parts of frustration, adjustment and compassion. Anyone who has every felt out of step, out of time or like a stranger in a place they love will connect with it. Of course, any cook will appreciate it, too - I got my copy from the library, but I plan on purchasing my own copy for the amazing recipes alone.
bakersfieldbarbara on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Why didn't I write a book about my adventures in Holland? This book is so true to how it is when one follows your heart and moves to Europe. Adapting is difficult, learning a new languge is an adventure, and trying to find ingredients for recipes takes days and weeks to master. I loved this book because it is exactly what I went through, only in the Netherlands. Try to learn a new language, a new culture, a new relationship, and then try not to miss the American way of life and food. Page after page, I remembered, and loved each thing I read, including the recipes. Adding the recipes made this book all that more enjoyable for those who would pick this book for reading. The recipes are like the desert at the end of the meal, and at the end of each chapter, the author inserted the recipe for the wonderful foods she was eating and learning about. This isn't just about food, though. This book takes you through relationship joys and tears, always with food added in, because we do have to eat, don't we? Enjoy this book, when you need to feel good about yourself, your life and your relationship. But don't think that you have to move to Europe to live as the book's contents show; you can do this romantic interlude in any city in any state in any country. It is all about risk, good food, openess to risk-taking and a sense of adventure. Read the book, and if you can't leave the country, at least set aside some time to dream about how it would be if you could live your own love story.
thebooky on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A young woman's memoir of falling in love with a Frenchman and ultimately falling in love with France, through tribulations and triumphs, food and family. I wish the characters were better developed. I had a hard time getting into the book because I didn't care much about the characters. I do think I will be trying some of the recipes.
ccayne on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A college intern falls in love with a French man her age and goes to live in Paris. What struck me about this story was the comparisons Bard drew between American way of life and the French. She was very specific - how young Americans define success vs. the French; how they approach illness and doctors, shopping, food, ambition and real estate. It was a really enjoyable read.
bugs5 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This was an enjoyable book. I love reading about France and this was an interesting look at France from an American's point of view.
frisbeesage on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Lunch in Paris is Elizabeth Bard's memoir of falling in love with a Frenchman over a pave au poivre for lunch. As the relationship advances she moves to Paris and encounters all the typical, but somehow never tiresome, dilemmas of an American in Paris. Like many before her she also falls in love with the culinary scene, discovering butchers and bakeries, markets and chic, little, sidewalk cafes. The recipes are doable and sound delicious - especially Pork Tenderloin with Four Kinds of Apples and Gwendal's Quick and Dirty Chocolate Souffle.The second half of the book delves deeper into what it really means to live in another country. I really enjoyed Bard's insight into managing relationships with in-laws ( on both sides), forming truly meaningful new friendships, sadly navigating the health care system, and making career decisions. Her careful, detailed look at the differences between the two cultures not only made me appreciate France more, it taught me a little bit more of what it means to be an American.This was a fun, easy read with more meat on its bones than I expected.
mlanzotti on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A lighthearted bio with recipes, this book was an enjoyable read. Reading it made me hungry, love the recipes. Also an exploration of cultural differences of America and France.