Life of an American Slave

Life of an American Slave

by Frederick Douglass

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Overview

"Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave" is an 1845 memoir and treatise on abolition written by famous orator and former slave Frederick Douglass during his time in Lynn, Massachusetts. It is generally held to be the most famous of a number of narratives written by former slaves during the same period. In factual detail, the text describes the events of his life and is considered to be one of the most influential pieces of literature to fuel the abolitionist movement of the early 19th century in the United States.

Frederick Douglass (1818 – 1895) was an American social reformer, abolitionist, orator, writer, and statesman. After escaping from slavery in Maryland, he became a national leader of the abolitionist movement in Massachusetts and New York, gaining note for his oratory and incisive antislavery writings. In his time, he was described by abolitionists as a living counter-example to slaveholders' arguments that slaves lacked the intellectual capacity to function as independent American citizens.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9788893457170
Publisher: Passerino
Publication date: 03/13/2019
Sold by: StreetLib SRL
Format: NOOK Book
File size: 871 KB

About the Author

Frederick Douglass (1818-1895), one of the most prominent figures in African American and U.S. history, was born into slavery and rose up to become an abolitionist, women's suffragist, editor, orator, author, statesman, and reformer.

Jonathan Reese (d. 1999) was a founding member of Berkeley's Straw Hat review and narrator of The Executioner's Song by Norman Mailer and Travels in Alaska by John Muir.

Hometown:

Tuckahoe, Maryland

Date of Birth:

1818

Date of Death:

February 20, 1895

Place of Death:

Washington, D.C.

Read an Excerpt

I have often been utterly astonished, since I came north, to find persons who could speak of the singing, among slaves, as evidence of their contentment and happiness. It is impossible to conceive of a greater mistake. Slaves sing most when they are most unhappy….Crying for joy, and singing for joy, were alike uncommon to me while in the jaws of slavery. The singing of a man cast away upon a desolate island might be as appropriately considered as evidence of contentment and happiness, as the singing of a slave; the songs of the one and of the other are prompted by the same emotion. -- from Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass

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