The Life of an American Slave

The Life of an American Slave

Audio CD(Unabridged, 4 CDs, 4 hrs. 30 min.)

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Overview

In 1845, just seven years after his escape from slavery, the young Frederick Douglass published this powerful account of his life in bondage and his triumph over oppression. The book, which marked the beginning of Douglass's career as an impassioned writer, journalist, and orator for the abolitionist cause, reveals the terrors he faced as a slave, the brutalities of his owners and overseers, and his harrowing escape to the North. It has become a classic of American autobiography.

This edition of the book, based on the authoritative text that appears in Yale University Press's multivolume edition of the Frederick Douglass Papers, is the only edition of Douglass's Narrative designated as an Approved Text by the Modern Language Association's Committee on Scholarly Editions. It includes a chronology of Douglass's life, a thorough introduction by the eminent Douglass scholar John Blassingame, historical notes, and reader responses to the first edition of 1845

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781400100477
Publisher: Tantor Media, Inc.
Publication date: 11/28/2005
Edition description: Unabridged, 4 CDs, 4 hrs. 30 min.
Product dimensions: 6.40(w) x 5.30(h) x 1.10(d)

About the Author

Frederick Douglass (1818-1895), one of the most prominent figures in African American and U.S. history, was born into slavery and rose up to become an abolitionist, women's suffragist, editor, orator, author, statesman, and reformer.

Jonathan Reese (d. 1999) was a founding member of Berkeley's Straw Hat review and narrator of The Executioner's Song by Norman Mailer and Travels in Alaska by John Muir.

Hometown:

Tuckahoe, Maryland

Date of Birth:

1818

Date of Death:

February 20, 1895

Place of Death:

Washington, D.C.

Read an Excerpt

I have often been utterly astonished, since I came north, to find persons who could speak of the singing, among slaves, as evidence of their contentment and happiness. It is impossible to conceive of a greater mistake. Slaves sing most when they are most unhappy….Crying for joy, and singing for joy, were alike uncommon to me while in the jaws of slavery. The singing of a man cast away upon a desolate island might be as appropriately considered as evidence of contentment and happiness, as the singing of a slave; the songs of the one and of the other are prompted by the same emotion. -- from Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass

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