ISBN-10:
0810100312
ISBN-13:
9780810100312
Pub. Date:
05/01/1968
Publisher:
Northwestern University Press
Le Morte D' Arthur

Le Morte D' Arthur

by Sir Thomas Malory, D. S. Brewer
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Overview

The Morte Darthur is a superb story of adventure and love, honor and betrayal, and one of the classics of world literature. Malory perfected his art during the writing of the long and complex work and the earlier parts, though excellent, lack the dramatic power and pervasive tragic irony of the passion, war, and society that constitutes the last quarter of the book. By presenting the last quarter alone, this edition focuses on the greatness of Malory's achievement and allows the reader to see it and enjoy it more fully.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780810100312
Publisher: Northwestern University Press
Publication date: 05/01/1968
Series: York Medieval Texts Series
Edition description: 1
Pages: 166
Sales rank: 758,782
Product dimensions: 5.12(w) x 7.75(h) x 0.50(d)

About the Author

No one knows for sure who the author of Le Morte D'Arthur was, but the generally accepted theory is that of American scholar G.L. Kitteredge, who argued it was Sir Thomas Malory, born in the first quarter of the fifteenth century, and who spent the greatest part of his last twenty years in prison. Another possibility is a Thomas Malory of Studley and Hutton in Yorkshire, or an author living north of Warwickshire. It is generally accepted that the author was a member of the gentry and a Lancastrain. John Lawlor was Professor of English Language and Literature at the University of Keele. He is the author of The Tragic Sense in Shakespeare, Piers Plowman: An Essay in Criticism and Chaucer. Janet Cowen is a senior lecturer in English at King's College, University of London

Read an Excerpt

Le Morte D'Arthur


By Thomas Malory

Northwestern University Press

Copyright © 1968 Thomas Malory
All right reserved.

ISBN: 0810100312


Chapter One


How Uther Pendragon sent for the duke of Cornwall and Igraine his wife, and of their departing suddenly again.


IT befell in the days of Uther Pendragon, when he was king of all England, and so reigned, that there was a mighty duke in Cornwall that held war against him long time. And the duke was called the Duke of Tintagil. And so by means King Uther sent for this duke, charging him to bring his wife with him, for she was called a fair lady, and a passing wise, and her name was called Igraine.

So when the duke and his wife were come unto the king, by the means of great lords they were accorded both. The king liked and loved this lady well, and he made them great cheer out of measure, and desired to have lain by her. But she was a passing good woman, and would not assent unto the king. And then she told the duke her husband, and said, I suppose that we were sent for that I should be dishonoured; wherefore, husband, I counsel you, that we depart from hence suddenly, that we may ride all night unto our own castle. And in like wise as she said so they departed, that neither the king nor none of his council were ware of their departing. All so soon as King Uther knew of their departingso suddenly, he was wonderly wroth. Then he called to him his privy council, and told them of the sudden departing of the duke and his wife.

Then they advised the king to send for the duke and his wife by a great charge; and if he will not come at your summons, then may ye do your best, then have ye cause to make mighty war upon him. So that was done, and the messengers had their answers; and that was this shortly, that neither he nor his wife would not come at him.

Then was the king wonderly wroth. And then the king sent him plain word again, and bade him be ready and stuff him and garnish him, for within forty days he would fetch him out of the biggest castle that he hath.

When the duke had this warning, anon he went and furnished and garnished two strong castles of his, of the which the one hight Tintagil, and the other castle hight Terrabil. So his wife Dame Igraine he put in the castle of Tintagil, and himself he put in the castle of Terrabil, the which had many issues and posterns out. Then in all haste came Uther with a great host, and laid a siege about the castle of Terrabil. And there he pight many pavilions, and there was great war made on both parties, and much people slain. Then for pure anger and for great love of fair Igraine the king Uther fell sick. So came to the king Uther Sir Ulfius, a noble knight, and asked the king why he was sick. I shall tell thee, said the king, I am sick for anger and for love of fair Igraine, that I may not be whole. Well, my lord, said Sir Ulfius, I shall seek Merlin, and he shall do you remedy, that your heart shall be pleased. So Ulfius departed, and by adventure he met Merlin in a beggar's array, and there Merlin asked Ulfius whom he sought. And he said he had little ado to tell him. Well, said Merlin, I know whom thou seekest, for thou seekest Merlin; therefore seek no farther, for I am he; and if King Uther will well reward me, and be sworn unto me to fulfil my desire, that shall be his honour and profit more than mine; for I shall cause him to have all his desire. All this will I undertake, said Ulfius, that there shall be nothing reasonable but thou shalt have thy desire. Well, said Merlin, he shall have his intent and desire. And therefore, said Merlin, ride on your way, for I will not be long behind.

Continues...


Excerpted from Le Morte D'Arthur by Thomas Malory Copyright © 1968 by Thomas Malory. Excerpted by permission.
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Table of Contents

Introduction vii(16)
Note on the Text xxiii(4)
Select Bibliography xxvii(4)
Chronology of Arthurian Material to 1500 xxxi(1)
Glossary of Recurrent Words xxxii
LE MORTE DARTHUR
FROM THE MARRIAGE OF KING UTHER UNTO KING ARTHUR How Uther Pendragon begot the Noble Conqueror King Arthur
3(79)
The Tale of Balin and Balan
33(17)
The Wedding of King Arthur
50(8)
Of Nenive and Morgan le Fay
58(24)
THE NOBLE TALE BETWIXT KING ARTHUR AND LUCIUS THE EMPEROR OF ROME
82(13)
A NOBLE TALE OF SIR LANCELOT DU LAKE
95(25)
THE TALE OF SIR GARETH OF ORKNEY
120(49)
THE BOOK OF SIR TRISTRAM DE LYONESSE
169(141)
Of Sir Galahad, Sir Lancelot's son
281(12)
Of Sir Lancelot
293(11)
Of Sir Tristram and of Sir Palomides
304(6)
THE NOBLE TALE OF THE SANGRAIL
310(93)
Of Sir Galahad
321(6)
Of Sir Gawain
327(2)
Of Sir Lancelot
329(6)
Of Sir Percival de Gales
335(11)
Of Sir Lancelot
346(5)
Of Sir Gawain and Sir Ector
351(6)
Of Sir Bors de Ganis
357(16)
Of Sir Galahad
373(15)
Of Sir Lancelot
388(7)
Of Sir Galahad
395(8)
THE TALE OF SIR LANCELOT AND QUEEN GUENIVERE
403(65)
THE DEATH OF ARTHUR
468(60)
APPENDIX Caxton's Preface 528(3)
Explanatory Notes 531(36)
Index of Characters 567

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Le Morte D' Arthur 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Helen Cooper, the editor of this edition, is among the foremost medievalists of our day. She is well versed in Chaucerian and Malorian literature, and is considered by her colleagues to be a truly brilliant scholar. After having heard her speak, I must concur - she is absolutely breathtaking. I would recommend this edition (or any other work she has set her hand to) most highly!