Lafcadio, the Lion Who Shot Back

Lafcadio, the Lion Who Shot Back

by Shel Silverstein

Hardcover(40th Anniversary Edition)

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Overview

Shel Silverstein's first children's book, Lafcadio, the Lion Who Shot Back—a whimsical tale of self-discovery and marshmallows—is turning fifty with a return to the vintage full-color cover.

Is a famous, successful, and admired lion a happy lion? Or is he a lion at all? Written and drawn with wit and gusto, Shel Silverstein's modern fable speaks not only to children but to us all!

First published in 1963, this book had rave reviews from the New York Times, Time magazine, and Publishers Weekly, as well as a starred review from Kirkus. Now celebrating its fiftieth anniversary, Lafcadio is being reissued with a full-color cover featuring vintage art from Shel Silverstein discovered in the archives.

Lafcadio, the Lion Who Shot Back is the book that started Shel Silverstein's incomparable career as a bestselling children's book author and illustrator. He is also the creator of picture books such as A Giraffe and a Half, Who Wants a Cheap Rhinoceros?, The Missing Piece, The Missing Piece Meets the Big O, and the perennial favorite The Giving Tree and of classic poetry collections such as Where the Sidewalk Ends, A Light in the Attic, Falling Up, Every Thing On It, Don't Bump the Glump!, and Runny Babbit.

And don't miss Runny Babbit Returns, the new bookk from Shel Silverstein!

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780060256753
Publisher: HarperCollins US
Publication date: 09/24/2013
Edition description: 40th Anniversary Edition
Pages: 112
Sales rank: 104,780
Product dimensions: 7.00(w) x 8.88(h) x 0.66(d)
Lexile: NC650L (what's this?)
Age Range: 4 - 8 Years

About the Author

Shel Silverstein 's incomparable career as a bestselling children's book author and illustrator began with Lafcadio, the Lion Who Shot Back. He is also the creator of picture books including A Giraffe and a Half, Who Wants a Cheap Rhinoceros?, The Missing Piece, The Missing Piece Meets the Big O, and the perennial favorite The Giving Tree, as well as classic poetry collections such as Where the Sidewalk Ends, A Light in the Attic, Every Thing On It, Don't Bump the Glump!, and Runny Babbit.


Shel Silverstein 's incomparable career as a bestselling children's book author and illustrator began with Lafcadio, the Lion Who Shot Back. He is also the creator of picture books including A Giraffe and a Half, Who Wants a Cheap Rhinoceros?, The Missing Piece, The Missing Piece Meets the Big O, and the perennial favorite The Giving Tree, as well as classic poetry collections such as Where the Sidewalk Ends, A Light in the Attic, Every Thing On It, Don't Bump the Glump!, and Runny Babbit.

Date of Birth:

September 25, 1930

Date of Death:

May 10, 1999

Place of Birth:

Chicago, Illinois

Place of Death:

Key West, Florida

Education:

Chicago School of Fine Arts; University of Illinois (no degree)

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Lafcadio, the Lion Who Shot Back 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 11 reviews.
hippieJ on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I have loved this book since i was little. its about a lion who basically trys to be welcomed into human society as a circus lion. however hes more of a human since he wears clothes and everything. he also has an obsession with marshmellows
missmath144 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is one of the greatest read-aloud books, with plenty opportunity for sound effects (especially roars). Lots of fun to read, although the ending is rather serious.
jebass on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A delightful story following a Lion who learns to use a gun and rids the jungle of hunters. He lives as a hero among his lion friends until a ringmaster recruits him to join the circus, with promises of marshmallows, fame and fortune. Lafcadio becomes Lafcadio the Great, and indeed becomes rich and famous, living as a human among humans until he is nearly no longer a lion. One day Lafcadio is invited to join his human friends on a hunting trip in Africa--where he is recognized by another Lion. Now Lafcadio must decide: does he want to be a lion and live among the lions, or would he rather be human and return to the city? Ultimately ***(spoiler!)*** he decides he'd rather be neither, and supposes he doesn't belong anywhere.I absolutely love the closing lines of the book, where Shel SIlverstein hints at an ending and then leaves the reader hanging. You're here at the end and you're wondering what's going to become of poor Lafcadio, who doesn't belong anywhere. Silverstein teases with, "...he didn't really know where he was going, but he did know he was going somewhere, because you really have to go somewhere, don't you? And he didn't really know what was going to happen to him, but he did know that something was going to happen, because something always does, doesn't it?'I was literally almost nodding my head in agreement as I turned the pages, but as it turns out, nothing happens to Lafcadio. He disappears, and the reader is left wondering along with the author, speculating as to his whereabouts, but the reader is left with a promise from Silverstein that, if he does get any word from Lafcadio, he will let us know.I feel that this book best belongs incorporated into an ELA/creative writing/storytelling unit, because of the whimsical way Silverstein tells the story, much of which is not at all grammatically correct. It serves as a great example of how a good story doesn't necessarily need perfect grammar, a conclusive ending, or even a "point" except to be a good, fun read for the reader.
mrstreme on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Lafcadio was originally published in 1963. Its content certainly wouldn't fly nowadays. Lafcadio is a lion who ate a hunter, confiscated his rifle and then how learned to shoot very accurately. He emigrated to the city and became a famous sharpshooting lion with the circus. He loved marshmellows and unleashed a mighty ROAR when he didn't get his way. Lafcadio became more man-like as he lived in the city, and he realized that he was not happy. He returned to the jungle and determined that he didn't like being a lion either. Lafcadio was torn, and the story ended with him roaming the countryside.Readers of The Giving Tree will recognize Silverstein's trademark "open" ending - allowing the reader to interpret the story's meaning. To me, the moral of the story is be careful what you wish for. But others could draw other meaningful lessons. Overall, once I got over the inclusion of guns and human death in a child's book (!), I thought the story was very lyrical and fun to read.
mctdlt More than 1 year ago
I have read this to students in K-12, gifted and not, they simply adored it!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have shared this book with my students for many years. Shel Silverstein writes a hilarious story that resonates with kids and adults. I read it at the beginning of the year and use it to teach all year long. Lafcadio will make you laugh and touch your heart!
Guest More than 1 year ago
My dad used to read this book to my sisters and I when we were kids, even in our early adolescents. It has been read over and over and would still probably have to me my all time favorites. It is an easy read, and extremely entertaining, I love Shel Silverstein.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is not just a silly kids book, its a book with a lot of meaning. when you look past the story line you find a hidden meaning. Shel Silverstein is an amazing author and knows how to inspire people in his work.
Guest More than 1 year ago
kids should read this book because if you like lion and guns this is the book for you. i think kids of the age 6 -10 should read this book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I read this book when I was a kid, the book is easy to read. It's about a lovable lion who loves marshmallows and goes off in search of marshmallows, I loved the book and was just thinking about it recently and decided to see if it was still in print. I would love to add this book in my vast collection and I would recommend you to do the same. It is also a good bedtime read for the kids.