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Overview

During the Crusades, Wilifrid, a young Saxon knight, embarks on a series of adventures to prove himself worthy of the princess Rowena, fighting the Normans and the Templars?and allied with such figures as Robin Hood and Richard the Lionheart.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780451531360
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 09/01/2009
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 528
Sales rank: 773,751
Product dimensions: 4.10(w) x 6.70(h) x 1.40(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Sir Walter Scott was born in Edinburgh in 1771. Educated for the law, he obtained the office of sheriff-depute of Selkirkshire in 1799 and in 1806 the office of clerk of session, a post whose duties he fulfilled for some twenty-five years. His lifelong interest in Scottish antiquity and the ballads which recorded Scottish history led him to try his hand at narrative poems of adventure and action. The Lay of the Last Minstrel (1805), Marmion (1808), and The Lady of the Lake (1810) made his reputation as one of the leading poets of his time. A novel, Waverley, which he had begun in 1805, was published anonymously in 1814. Subsequent novels appeared with the note “by the author of Waverley”; hence his novels often are called collectively “the Waverley novels.” Some of the most famous of these are Old Mortality (1816), Rob Roy (1817), Ivanhoe (1819), Kenilworth (1821), and Quentin Durward (1823). In recognition of his literary work Scott was made a baronet in 1819. During his last years he held various official positions and published biographies, editions of Swift and Dryden, tales, lyric poetry, and various studies of history and antiquity. He died in 1832.
Sharon Kay Penman was born in New York City and grew up in New Jersey. She has a BA in history from the University of Texas and a Juris Doctor degree from Rutgers School of Law. She has not practiced law since the publication of her first novel, The Sunne in Splendour, in 1982. To date, she has written six historical novels and two medieval mysteries. She has lived in England and Wales while researching books, and currently lives in New Jersey.

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Ivanhoe 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 328 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
'Ivanhoe' remains as much of a pleasure to read, this time with my grand-daughter, as it was when I first read it nearly fifty years ago. And the editor has provided an introduction which offers some interesting insights into Scott and his book. Beware the annotations, however, for there Professor Wood reveals himself hopelessly out of his depth. The notes suffer from both political correctness, e.g., his implied claims that the crusaders had no reason to wage war war against Muslims, and inexcusable ignorance, e.g., his statement that Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego were brothers and that Iconium was the the medieval--it was the ancient--name of modern Konya.
rp-in-texas More than 1 year ago
I am new to E-Books I tried loading this book. When it appeared, it was in French. Nowhere does it say the book would be in French. What a BIG disappointment.
Pedge More than 1 year ago
This is an abridged version about half the length of the original. Intended for a young audience. I deleted after downloading as it did not meet my needs.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
One of my favorite novels, but the eBook kept freezing on my Nook. Eventually I deleted from my library without being able to read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I was apprehensive about reading _Ivanhoe_, but I took it under the recommendation of a very well-respected professor. Between its covers, I have found a new favorite novel! I was completely captivated by the story itself, and the characters were so well-crafted that at times I forgot that I was reading. If you are looking for an enjoyable read, full of chivalry, adventure, and bravery 'from both men AND women', look no further than _Ivanhoe_.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Ivanhoe was much better than I thought it would be. I have a passion for the medieval times so this book was perfect. Its filled with adventure, romance, and chivalry. The characters are wonderful! This book was amazing!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Jacob Turner Top 5 Favorite Book. I recommend this book for the following reasons. Ivanhoe was a book in which I had great ease and comfort in reading. I was captured in this book, as the tension was building between the Saxons and the Normans. The book presented a nail biting and edgy experience as you turned page to page, with hints of romance sprinkled throughout.   The turmoil and mischievous action keeps you wanting to read. You quickly find yourself flipping pages as if you are watching a movie.   The setting of Ivanhoe is medieval England, in the late twelfth century. The historical environment of which the novel takes place is one that changes with quickness.  Saxon England has been taken by Norman French for over a century, but the invasion of England’s best homes and land is still going forward as fast as ever. This setting has proven to create great uncertainty in leaving you wondering what next and contemplating upcoming confrontations or situations.  The main characters are Cedric, Ivanhoe, a.k.a. Wilfred, Athelstane, Rowena, Brian de Bois-Guilbert, Front-de-Boeuf, Richard Plantagenet, John Plantagenet, Waldemar Fitzurse, Isaac, Rebecca, and Maurice De Bracy. This novel would be on my must read list for anyone who enjoys medieval struggle and strife.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Its in French!!!!!!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If your looking for a book that has action this is it if your looking for a book that has drama step aside days of our lives if you want adventure its got that as well indiana jones wishes he had this much adventure. This book takes all the action and adveture and puts it on the midevil level it awesome. And in this story you get the real story of robin hood well a good amount anyway. This is a must read it should be your library if you got one going.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I found iy a little confising, but something that i would read again
Roger Beede More than 1 year ago
I was captivated by this book's storyline as well as the quaint language. I had only seen the movie before and the book is ever so much better!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Ivanhoe is not written in 'Old English'. It is modern English, written in the 19th century, so some of the prose may seem antiquated to a modern reader. This is an example of Old English, from Beowulf: 'Hwæt! We Gardena in geardagum' . This is Middle English, from Chaucer's Canterbury Tales: 'Whan that Aprill, with his shoures soote/The droghte of March hath perced to the roote'. Spenser, Shakespeare, and definitely Scott all wrote in Modern English--which has been used since the English Renaissance in the 15th century.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The old English prose of this book is somewhat difficult to read at first & the initial prospect of reading several hundred pages of this seems somewhat akin to watching paint dry. But once you get used to this type of writing, the book is exciting, funny & intriguing. For lovers of historical fiction, this is one of the best. From the tormented chivalry of Ivanhoe, the hubrous of the Templar, the obstianancy & pride of Cedric, the beauty & grace of Rowena & Rebecca, the sharp witted humor of Wamba, the faithfulness of Gurth, and the pride and love of the miserly Isaac this work covers the gamut of society in medival England. Definitiely worth the read!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Sir Walter Scott's 1819 novel IVANHOE is a thoroughly enjoyable masterpiece by one of the greatest story tellers this world is ever likely to know. Hints are given as to where the story is going, making it easy to follow despite being set in long ago England. Memorable characters abound, especially the Norman Knight Templar, villainous Brian de Bois-Guibert, the Jewess Rebecca of York and a supporting cast led by Wamba the Jester and Gurth the swineherd. Throw in the thinly disguised Black Knight (King Richard the Lion-Hearted), his crafty brother Prince John, Robin Hood and his Merry Men, sullen Saxons, ruthless Normans like Front-de-Boeuf, worldly churchmen, beautiful women and the lovers Wilfred of Ivanhoe and Rowena and you have a tale hard to set down till read cover to cover. *** The motivations of all the characters as well as 'where they are coming from' drive their actions. The visual backdrop is lush from joust, to castle siege, to witch trial. *** Finally, this is a powerful study of anti-Semitism, a few generations before Jews were driven out of England. The scene in Chapter XXVIII when Ivanhoe wakes to find his wound well tended by Rebecca is unforgettable. Initially, he is grateful. But honesty compels her to say, 'your handmaiden is a poor Jewess.' And 'Ivanhoe was too good a Catholic to retain the same class of feelings toward a Jewess.' Though it was hard for him to overcome the prejudices dinned into him by church and culture, in the end Ivanhoe alone champions Rebecca and prevents her being burned at the stake for witchcraft by the Grand Master of the Knights Templar. In her meeting with an apparently unprejudiced Rowena at novel's end, Rebecca of York asserts (Ch. XLIV) ' ... there is a gulf betwixt us. Our breeding, our faith, alike forbid either to pass over it. Farewell.' *** IVANHOE may be the best work of Scott's for someone to read first. It will not be his last.
hemlokgang on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The Norman Saxon conflict expressed through the battles on the fields of chivalry, in the castles, in the forests. So-so.
vidalia11 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I'm listening to the Ivanhoe audiobook in my car, and it's quite entertaining. Perhaps hearing it is more enjoyable than reading it. For me, the language is beautiful to hear.
minimarg on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Very good story, but I would have much rather read the entire thing instead of the copy I have, which is a condensed version for children.
TadAD on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Knights, adventure, intrigue—it's got it all.
lunanshee on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Scott¿s classic epic following the adventures of a disinherited knight who fights to restore Richard the Lion Heart to his throne and to regain his own honor. Battles, intrigue and romance abound in this heroic tale. Surprisingly easy to read and quite enjoyable. Ivanhoe reads like a fast-paced ballad and, although it is a long story, the action is evenly spread throughout. I would recommend this classic to anyone who enjoys an epic tale about knights, Templars, friars, lords, ladies and kings. Popular folk heroes Robin Hood, the Black Knight and Friar Tuck also make cameo appearances.
TeenBookReviews on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Scott¿s classic epic following the adventures of a disinherited knight who fights to restore Richard the Lion Heart to his throne and to regain his own honor. Battles, intrigue and romance abound in this heroic tale. Surprisingly easy to read and quite enjoyable. Ivanhoe reads like a fast-paced ballad and, although it is a long story, the action is evenly spread throughout. I would recommend this classic to anyone who enjoys an epic tale about knights, Templars, friars, lords, ladies and kings. Popular folk heroes Robin Hood, the Black Knight and Friar Tuck also make cameo appearances.
jaygheiser on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Enjoyable rollicking adventure with damsels in distress, Robin Hood & Merry Men, Richard Lionheart
craiglucas on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Great Classic story. The ending was a bit of a let down, as it seemed a bit rushed. The language used thoughout was overly wordy and difficult to read. It would be great if modernised.
bhenry11 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
My version of this book was abridged for a middle-school audience, and published in 1936 as part of the Heath Golden Key Series. That said, it was still 464 pages long and written in early 19th-century English purporting to be Middle English. What that means is that it sometimes takes Scott three paragraphs or longer to have a character say "No thank you, I'm not hungry." Ivanhoe is a stupendous work of historical fiction, mixing the best romantic chivalrous pursuits of knights, fair maidens, and swashbuckling peasants and outlaws with double-crosses and villainy straight out of an Errol Flynn movie (until you realize that Hollywood in all likelihood stole their greatest plot devices from Scott and the rest of the canon). It's a love story full of virtue, love, friendship, trust in combat, ambition, and, most unsettling, anti-semitism. In fact, it was very hard for me to get past the rampant anti-semitism in the writing and dialogue, even between the good guys (Richard the Lion-hearted, Robin Hood, and Ivanhoe).The story gets a little weak towards the conclusion ¿ the fate of Athelstane comes to mind, as does the unsatisfying end to Brian de Bois-Guilbert, the Knight Templar ¿ but that's okay. It's a page-turner of a classic, full of funny-named helpers (Gurth, Wamba), knights in disguise, and virtuous women.Recommended.
MarysGirl on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I couldn't remember if I had read this years ago or was remembering the movie. In any case, this was a fun read. The story is exciting with many of our favorite folk heroes - King Richard the Lion-Hearted, Robin Hood, Friar Tuck - shown in their most favorable light. The titular character actually spends a lot of the book flat on his back. What I enjoyed most about the book is the language and style. This first came out in 1820 and the prose style is delightfully archaic. Scott shows deep insight into human psyche, sharply drawing his characters, poking fun at hypocrisy and pomposity, and sympathetically portraying the humanity of the less fortunate.
Hamburgerclan on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Now I know why bookstores have different sections for fiction and literature. Just before reading this, I read The Ivanhoe Gambit, which is based on Ivanhoe. I thought Gambit to be a good book. But it is quite pale in comparison to Ivanhoe itself. The plot, the characters and the descriptions of the setting have much more depth than the same in Mr. Hawke's work. I was half tempted to believe that I was meeting real people in 12th Century England. (Of course, I should also point out that Ivanhoe is a much longer book...) Anyway, the tale centers on Sir Wilfred of Ivanhoe, a Saxon knight who has returned from a crusade in the Holy Land. His father has disowned him, because he dared to love the noble Rowena against the old man's wishes. His nation is under the power of Prince John, the dishonest brother of King Richard, who is looking to seize the throne for himself and who would not welcome Wilfred, a loyal follower of the King. What follows is a masterful tale of chivalry, politics and romance played out by realistic characters. The 18th century English of the book is not for the faint of heart, but it is definitely worth the effort to read. It's a book for which I'll have to find space on my shelf.--J.